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Hardware Review: Lilliput 669GL-70NP/C/T 7" HDMI Monitor

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by , 04-26-2010 at 10:05 AM (7378 Views)


What is it?

The Lilliput 669GL is a brand new 7” touchscreen monitor featuring HDMI connectivity.

The Verdict:

When weighing the new features with some of the things still missing in a 2010 Lilliput model, its clear to see that the 669GL is the first model in what many hope will be the future of small touchscreen monitors. Lilliput obviously spent time and focus on getting HDMI/DVI capabilities to work, and they DO work. This is the clearest Lilliput display out there, as long as you are not working in the sun.

See the Lilliput 669GL on the mp3Car Store here.



What’s in the box?



The Lilliput 669GL comes packed with practically every kind of cable you would need to use with the monitor. Included is an HDMI to HDMI-USB cable, HDMI to DVI-USB cable, VGA to VGA-USB cable, and a DIN to composite (2 input) cable. For power, the 669GL comes with both a home A/C adapter plug and a 12v DC car charger cable. The 669GL also comes with a standard VESA mount, remote control with battery, touchscreen driver CD, and instruction manual.

Description:

The 669GL-70NP/C/T is the latest 7” touchscreen monitor Lilliput has released. To my knowledge it is the first 7” monitor of its kind to feature on-board HDMI connection. The creators were wise to leave compatibility with the tried and true VGA connection, and even threw a HDMI to DVI cable to further enhance compatibility. Regardless of your preferred input source, the Lilliput 669 has you covered.



Though it makes hardly any difference when connecting to 669GL to a standard computer, car PC enthusiast should find the HDMI connection a lifesaver when it comes to getting a monitor installed in a vehicle. This is of course is provided they have the motherboard and/or video card that accepts either an HDMI or DVI connector. Prior models of Lilliput and other small monitors in the car PC community have suffered from screen ghosting and/or flickering as a result of having to run long strands of analog cabling inside a motor vehicle where interference issues tend to be more prevalent. I made it a point to test this issue with a full-digital HDMI connection. My aging Lilliput 629 installed in the dash of my RSX has always had some level of flickering and the ghosting of images and text is just something I grew to live with. I’m happy to say that the connecting the HDMI from my Intel DG45FC motherboard directly to the Lilliput 669 immediately solved BOTH problems.



I also noticed shortly after powering up the PC that the colors on the screen just appear deeper than with previous Lilliput screens. I don’t know if it’s the digital connection or perhaps the new LCD panel installed in the 669GL, but the color and contrast is among the best I’ve seen on a 7” screen. Text appears sharper than before, even in the 1024x768 photos shown above. With an HDMI connection the screen is fully capable with 1080i/p playback, a feat that's extremely impressive for a rather small screen.The Lilliput 669GL features an all new bezel, new LCD panel (Innolux AT070TN82), and a new, slightly larger controller board. This of course means someone wanting to upgrade from an older lilliput may find complications in there existing fabrication when switching to the 669GL. The HDMI sticks out more than the previous VGA cable. This coupled with the larger controller board means the 669GL is not easily compatible with enclosures such as the double-din enclosure that MP3car store sells. I was able to just barely make the enclosure work by using a right-angle HDMI adapter and alternate means of securing the controller board to the enclosure.



The main problem you encounter with the 669GL occurs when you place this monitor into direct sunlight. For some unknown reason, the manufacturer decided to scale back the brightness on the 669GL. The rating in the monitor’s specification is just 250 nits. If there were one absolute bummer when it comes to the 669GL it’s that its just not meant to be used sunlight. The colors completely wash out, and because the screen is not transflective you must deal with a tremendous amount of glare before even beginning to interpret what’s on screen. Below are two comparison photos; the first is with no flash taken with my digital camera, the second with flash and a rather low ISO.



Unfortunately, the brightness on the LCD isn’t the only thing missing from the Lilliput 669GL. It does not currently have the ability to automatically switch to an auxiliary input upon connection of a 12v source. This means us with rear-view cameras must come up with another plan to see what we’re backing up into. Prior model Lilliputs like the 629 had the ability to modify the controller panel to accommodate this feature but to this point it’s not possible to do on the 669GL.One feature that’s missing that perhaps will not affect car PC users is the lack of backlit buttons on the front of the enclosure. To my knowledge this is the first Lilliput that has had this missing. The power button lights up, barely, but the other buttons remain in the dark.The last feature that didn’t make the cut is the ability to control the screens brightness via a photosensor on the enclosure. At first glance it appears the IR receiver on the front of the Lilliput bezel has been modified to accommodate this in the same manner than competing Xenarc and other devices do, but in testing I see no difference in screen brightness between light and dark rooms.

The Positive:

• HDMI connectivity
• Abundance of wiring options
• Cleaner display with rich color and better contrast
• Native resolution of 800x480, with the ability to display 1080p
• Auto-power on when video signal is detected
• Priced well to compete with other manufacturers

The Negative:
• Lower brightness rating than competing products
• No auto-switch capability
• No auto-dimmer found in competing products
• STILL no transflective!
• New controller board means incompatility with some bezels on the market

The Verdict:

When weighing the new features with some of the things still missing in a 2010 Lilliput model, its clear to see that the 669GL is the first model in what many hope will be the future of small touchscreen monitors. Lilliput obviously spent time and focus on getting HDMI/DVI capabilities to work, and they DO work. This is the clearest Lilliput display out there, as long as you are not working in the sun.

See the Lilliput 669GL on the mp3Car Store here.

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Updated 04-26-2010 at 10:14 AM by Sonicxtacy02

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What is it?

The Mp3car Toughbox 15 is a Chenbro based mini-ITX computer built with an Intel D510MO motherboard. Mp3car allows a full line of customization options with the Toughbox 15, and the price for a self-installed Toughbox 15 starts at only $279.00

The Verdict:

The Toughbox 15 is perhaps the most versatile bundle that Mp3car has currently. It seems to have the flexibility to find a niche no matter where it’s installed. Everything with the Toughbox 15 works… and it works quietly, elegantly and efficiently. Whether you’re looking for a do-it-all car computer platform, a sturdy quiet and energy-efficient workstation, or a stable and reliable embedded application, the Toughbox 15 from Mp3car can work for you.

See the ToughBox 15 on the mp3Car Store here.



What’s in the box?


The base Toughbox 15 system consists of a Chenbro mini ITX enclosure, an optional vertical stand, an Intel D510MO motherboard with an integrated Intel Atom D510 processor, 512 MHz of DDR2 ram, and a 160GB laptop grade hard drive. The Chenbro case has openings for 2 front USB ports and connectors front-case audio. The Toughbox 15 also comes standard with a 60w power supply and A/C adapter. The Toughbox 15 differs from the previous systems sold by Mp3car as it comes fully tested and assembled with no extra cost. Optionally, Mp3car allows expansion of the Toughbox 15 by adding a 2 port USB module, a Panasonic UJ-875-A slot-load DVD/CD drive, 2GHz of DDR 2 Ram, an Intel 80GB solid-state hard drive, Nano USB Bluetooth dongle, and an external USB 802.11B/G/N Wifi Card. To further aid in the installation process Mp3car will optionally install Windows 7 Professional operating system, and add a M2-ATX vehicle power supply. The total price for the Toughbox 15 with all included options is $967.94.

Description:

The Toughbox 15, like the Toughbox 14, is a small, lightweight and powerful dual-core computing system. Its design and specifications prove the Toughbox 15 is worthy of more than just a basic car PC installation. In fact, with the look of its sleek and elegant case, the Toughbox 15 may be better suited as a workstation or an embedded platform. The Chenbro case is simply the best looking case I’ve seen to date in the hobby. There’s a large chrome colored power switch on the front of the case which illuminates with a bright but not intrusive blue ring of LEDs. The edges are curved and the included vertical stand shows the Toughbox 15 would be right at home on any desk or HTPC rack out there.






The Toughbox 15 also improves on its power specifications from the Toughbox 14. It uses the new Intel D510 dual-core processor. Though its clock speed varies only slightly from the Atom N270 (1.66 GHz vs. 1.6 GHz), the D510 handles itself quite well with video playback and more CPU-intensive programs. The Toughbox’s processor is passively cooled, which means less noise in your workspace, while taking up less than three quarters of the size of today’s conventional desktop workstations.




I feel it’d be a shame to take the design of the Toughbox 15 and install it in a trunk or behind a panel in an automobile, but that doesn’t mean the Toughbox 15 isn’t ready for the task. Simply remove the standard 60w PSU and mount a M2-ATX automotive power supply, and the Toughbox 15 will handle any car PC task. It runs Flux Media’s Centrafuse Auto on its highest graphic and effect settings with no lag. iNav iGuidance and iGo 8 PC will run embedded into a front end flawlessly.


As with most computers, the magic is inside the case. Removing the outer shell of the Chenbro case revealed the D510MO motherboard with a fan-less heat sink covering both the embedded processor and chipset.


To my approval, the 2 available RAM slots are spaced far enough from the heat sink that installing a chip of RAM isn’t nearly as painful as with most embedded dual-core setups. To the right of the motherboard in a vertical mount is the included 60w power supply.




The standard power supply connects to the outside 12v A/C adapter through a barrel connector on the rear of the case. This same connector can be connected to the optional M2-atx, meaning less loose wires cluttering up the rear of your case in the event you want to install the Toughbox in a vehicle.

Unlike the Toughbox 14, the Toughbox 15’s enclosure has enough space to house a laptop style slot-load dvd/cd combo drive. This again shows that the Toughbox would fit right at home or in the workplace. The combo drive’s wires are all run to the motherboard, meaning no USB slots are taken like with most car PCs. Sharing a bracket with the combo drive is a 160GB laptop grade hard drive. Mp3car does have options for hard drive installations in the Toughbox 15, and most car PC users should probably elect to use the 40GB ruggedized drive or perhaps the 80GB solid state drive available.

The rear of the Toughbox 15 is of standard ITX PC fare, the only real difference is the presence of the barrel-connector mentioned earlier. There are 4 USB ports assuring an abundance of connectivity options. There’s your standard VGA connector, Ethernet connector, and the standard 3 audio connectors. Instead of opting for more USB or firewire connection options, Intel decided to keep standard ps/2 connectors for keyboard and mouse. It baffles me why they decided to keep these connectors on a new motherboard, especially considering most hardware manufacturers don’t even make ps/2 keyboard and mouse devices anymore. The rear is also missing a DVI port, something that’s been included in nearly every other motherboard Intel has released in the last 2 years.


Aside from those 2 questionable calls, the rear connectors on the back of the Toughbox 15 are clean and nicely spaced, allowing for hassle free installation in both the workplace and the car.

The Positive:

• Absolute beautiful and well thought out casing
• Customizable to individual user needs
• Performance and reliability of the Intel dual-core product
• Energy efficient design
• Flexible enough to be installed in the home, work, or car
• Small form factor which allows for multiple mounting options
• Comes with power supply for the home and options for the car

The Negative:

• Sacrifices USB connectors for legacy ps/2 connectors
• No DVI display output
• Use of more than 2 channel audio requires an additional header connection
• Cost when compared to self-built self-sourced system

The Verdict:

The Toughbox 15 is perhaps the most versatile bundle that Mp3car has currently. It seems to have the flexibility to find a niche no matter where it’s installed. Everything with the Toughbox 15 works… and it works quietly, elegantly and efficiently. Whether you’re looking for a do-it-all car computer platform, a sturdy quiet and energy-efficient workstation, or a stable and reliable embedded application, the Toughbox 15 from Mp3car can work for you.

See the ToughBox 15 on the mp3Car Store here.