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Product Reviews

  1. Hardware Review: Xenarc 700CSH 7" Capacitive Touchscreen Monitor

    by , 12-09-2013 at 02:37 PM

    What is it?

    The Xenarc 700CSH is a 7 Inch display with a capacitive touchscreen input.

    The Verdict:

    Yes and yes! The Xenarc 700CSH's capacitive touchscreen sets it apart from other displays in the segment. The clear and precise overlay allows the quality of the monitors display to shine through any glare. The 700CSH proves that Xenarc has been watching, as it addresses most of the long-standing shortcomings of small display screens.



    What’s in the box?

    The Xenarc box comes with the touchscreen monitor, VESA mount, wall and car chargers, input cabling which includes HDMI/VGA/Composite video connections, a HDMI -> DVI adapter, full-function remote, instruction manual, and a cable locking clasp.


    For a quick video of the unboxing for the 700CSH please click here.

    Description:

    Another year brings a another offering in the series of Xenarc 7 Inch monitors. The 700 series has seen its' share of small changes over the last few years, but nothing on the scale of the new 700CSH. This monitor shares the same physical dimensions as the older models, but offers so much more in the form of a beautiful capacitive touchscreen overlay.


    The community here at mp3Car.com has long searched for a install monitor which attempts to draw us closer to the visual fidelity of today's smartphones and tablets. Like Xenarc, each competing brand attempted to fulfill the needs of the community with features like high-brightness displays and a greater set of available inputs, but each of the monitors were limited by the resistive touchscreen overlays. Resistive touchscreens will often mute the color of the underlying screen and disperse surface lighting in a manner which at times makes it dangerous to use while driving an automobile in the daytime. Capacitive touchscreen technology allows for more of the screen's natural tones to come through and focuses oncoming light rather than disperse it. The difference comparing the Xenarc 700CSH with a resistive model is truly night and day. Check out the following example showing the 700CSH when compared to last year's Xenarc. Both pictures were taken during similar lighting.


    The improvements to the 700CSH didn't just stop at the touchscreen however. The display has received a bump up in native resolution. Instead of the 800x600 resolution we've come to expect, Xenarc has increased the 700CSH to 1024x600. The end result is a gorgeous display that does away with some of the pixilation seen on other models. It's still no Galaxy S4 or retina display, but the lines between have definitely been blurred. Car PC purists fear not, the 700CSH can still display between 800x480 and 1920x1080, PC willing. The brightness rating of 500nits and the contrast ratio of 400:1 are carryovers from prior models, but, because of the touchscreen, offer more bang for their buck.


    Xenarc has carried over all of the luxury features from prior models. You can still expect to get things like auto-switching to a composite input, auto power-on, and auto-brightness via the on-board photosensor. The menu system of the 700CSH is more expansion, offering more control than older models. Options like audio-over-HDMI and input switching control are welcomed additions. The included remote is actually usable, as it allows for full operation of the device rather than a subset of functions. Xenarc advertises that the touchscreen will still operate even if a fingerprint or scratch protector overlay is used. Fingerprints almost seem more of an issue with this touchscreen, but I personally feel like it'd be a shame to do anything to alter the display quality.



    The Positive:

    • The best display quality for the segment, bar none
    • Includes cable management options
    • Rock solid build quality
    • Fully functional remote included



    The Negative:

    • Bezel is larger than competitors


    The Verdict:

    Yes and yes! The Xenarc 700CSH's capacitive touchscreen sets it apart from other displays in the segment. The clear and precise overlay allows the quality of the monitors display to shine through any glare. The 700CSH proves that Xenarc has been watching, as it addresses most of the long-standing shortcomings of small display screens.

    Stay tuned for more photos, disassembly videos, pricing information, and availability on the Xenarc 700CSH

  2. Hardware Review: Andrea Electronics WNC-1500 Wireless Computer Headset

    by , 03-11-2013 at 10:52 AM

    What is it?

    The Andrea Electronics WNC-1500 is a Wireless Computing Headset featuring digital audio enhancement and noise cancellation.

    The Verdict:

    The WNC-1500 is an excellent option when looking for a wireless communication device for VOIP. Communication was crystal clear in a variety of busy environments. The headset is very comfortable and provides a secure fit allowing for a pleasant listening experience.



    What’s in the box?

    The WNC-1500 Comes with the headset, a 2.4ghz USB adapter, USB charging cable, a convenient carrying case, and an instruction manual. Software is also available for download from AndreaElectronics.com


    Description:

    Andrea Electronics is widely known in this community for the stellar series of Superbeam USB microphones. When installing a automotive PC, the Superbeam was the best available option for hands-free audio communication for a very long time. The quality of the Superbeam bundle has been reassembled into a wireless audio headset named the WNC-1500.


    Each part of the WNC-1500 package has been considered for fit and finish. The headset itself is extremely comfortable, which each part of the headset which touches your ear cushioned more than adequately with genuine leather. The attached microphone with included pop filter rests away from the face but in ideal position for vocal clarity. Microphone placement was considered not only for clarity, but it stays out of the way during video conferencing for the most part. The headband is also cushioned and does an excellent job of securing the headset speakers comfortably. Being wireless, the device is made to be mobile, and consideration was certainly made to keep the headset snug without being painful.


    The WNC-1500 comes with a convenient set of controls on the right earbud. Included buttons are for volume control, music playback next/previous track, power, and configuration. The buttons are raised with a firm press, but unless you use the headset often, you may find using conventional computer controls more friendly. I find myself hunting for the proper control through trial and error too often.


    The most endearing feature of the WNC-1500 set is the audio quality. Its crystal clear that in it's out of the box form, the headset is made for verbal communication. Despite being wireless, I could effectively speak and listen as if using a landline form of communication. There was simply no static or filtering noises with callers, and they never reported issue in response to my end. Andrea calls it "military grade acoustic noise cancelling technology", I'll just say it does the job and then some. The headset does just enough to filter ambient noises locally as to not disturb what your ears are hearing through the 40mm speaker drivers. By default, the headset doesn't thrill in regard to music or gaming enjoyment, but the included software has a 10 band graphic equalizer to aid in this regard. Despite this, I still felt at times that the headset muffled the audio experience while gaming at its most ideal setting. The virtual surround sound feature was lacking.

    The WNC-1500 is powered by a built in lithium-ion battery. Simply plug in the WNC-1500 with the included USB cable and it will charge fully and relatively short time. The LED indicator on the headset will indicate when charging has completed. During testing, I observed battery life in the 5-7 hour range, more than enough for one sitting. The wireless range too was outstanding as audio clarity would hardly be affected until I was some 40 feet from the USB adapter. This far exceeds any bluetooth headset I've used to date.

    The Positive:

    • Terrific audio quality and noise cancellation
    • USB rechargeable
    • Comfortable design and secure
    • Fold away design and included carrying case means the headset will go where you do
    • Excellent battery life and range

    The Negative:

    • Not immersive sound for gamers
    • Must use device manager to enable/disable the USB adapter as your primary sound card


    The Verdict:


    The WNC-1500 is an excellent option when looking for a wireless communication device for VOIP. Communication was crystal clear in a variety of busy environments. The headset is very comfortable and provides a secure fit allowing for a pleasant listening experience.



  3. More on CES: "Square" your car PC away with Xi3

    by , 01-16-2013 at 01:10 PM

    The Xi3 booth at CES was jam-packed with these ultra-cool x86 computing systems. Shown above is the Xi3 5A. This 4" modular cube houses a 1.8ghz dual-core AMD CPU, 2GB of system RAM, and up to 1TB of solid state storage. It's modular design allows for a host of peripheral devices, with multiple options for USB/ eSATA, and display ports. The 5A does include a fan for system cooling, but I can say after demoing the device it's indeed silent. It sips power at only 20 watts, and can be powered from 12-24v.






    So what's missing from making this a go to Car PC option? The only downside i see is the lack of the smart automotive power management that we know from Opus and Minibox systems, but because the device is modular and Xi3 is looking at the device to be installed anywhere possible, the engineers eyes lit up at the idea of creating a automotive add-on module to handle that. ETA is of course unknown, but it's great that there's another company out there that gets frenzied up for car PC goodies.


    If the 1.8 dual core isn't enough power for your setup, Xi3 has other builds that might work. The X7a, while slightly more power demanding at 40 watts, packs quad core power and more memory to boot. It's plenty powerful enough for the user who needs to video edit or game on the go.

    The Xi3 modular systems start at just $399.

  4. Hardware Review: MIMO 720F USB Touchscreen Monitor

    by , 12-16-2012 at 02:51 PM

    What is it?

    The MIMO 720F is a USB powered touchscreen monitor with a built-in fixture style mount.

    The Verdict:

    The second iteration of the MIMO 720F touchscreen monitor features improved performance all around. The colors are brighter, touch layer seems clearer, and drivers are more stable. Whether the 720F is the best for you simply depends on your mounting preference, as the mount design can make or break your install.



    What’s in the box?

    The MIMO 720F box comes with the touchscreen monitor, single power/control USB cable, driver CD, mounting screws, and instruction manual.


    Description:

    Ever since the USB Touchscreen Showdown I have received request for a more in-depth look at the MIMO 720F USB Touchscreen monitor. Having had a second go-round with the display, I can confirm basically all of the pluses and minuses from 2011. The 720F is a fantastic option if considering to add an additional monitor your car PC setup... provided you engineer a manner to mount it.


    Easily, the most differentiating item on the 720F is the "flex" mount. Where most 7-inch screens are going to come with a removable bottom mount solution, this version of the 720 system comes with four non-removable mounting arms. MIMO suggests that there are thousands of applications in which to use this unique design, and honestly, I can see many methods in which the mount would be preferred around the house or at work. The available suction cup mount means you can practically mount the 720F on any stationary mounting surface. There's also a headrest mount for display on the go. However, if you're the type who plans an installation that looks like it's meant the be there, the flex mount will more than likely be a hindrance.


    So while prospective purchasers may have a decision to make regarding the 720F's backside, no one will have a problem with the business end. The MIMO device is easily the nicest looking USB touchscreen to date. The bezel is sleek and clean with no forward facing buttons to speak of. Aside from the MIMO logo on the bottom of the bezel, the 720F can absolutely look OEM properly implemented in a car. Even the power light seems to be considered, as it is offset and not blindingly bright at night.


    The good looks continue when your operating system loads and the display comes to life. Where the first generation was inhibited with some pixilation and color banding issues, "Season 2" of the 720F has drastically improved visuals whether during movement or stationary. I'm not entirely positive if it's the improved DisplayLink drivers or the hardware itself, but rest assured the 720F will display the way you desire. Keep in mind though that you're still limited to a fixed resolution of 800x480, and USB display means your operating system must load before the 720F will work.


    As with all USB touchscreens, the driver requirement put Windows users first in terms of display and touch screen support. The included DisplayLink drivers for Windows have been improved and the result is an increase in stability. I have not experienced the problems resuming from suspend modes as I had in previous iterations. Mac OSX users have been added to the list of users that can take advantage of the MIMO display, provided they don't mind having to purchase a third-party USB driver. Android users may not be left out for long, as there are efforts to bring a Android-friendly driver to the front as well for host-mode compatible devices.

    The Positive:

    • Superb display quality which rivals HDMI competitors
    • Uses a single USB
    • OSX and Android driver options are now available in limited capacity
    • Sleek bezel design


    The Negative:

    • Mounting system may limit install capabilities
    • Still requires Windows to load before it will display
    • Single USB cable may cause problems with some USB hubs

    The Verdict:

    The second iteration of the MIMO 720F touchscreen monitor features improved performance all around. The colors are brighter, touch layer seems clearer, and drivers are more stable. Whether the 720F is the best for you simply depends on your mounting preference, as the mount design can make or break your install.

    The MIMO 720F is available on Amazon

    For a video comparing the 720F with the other latest USB Touchscreens click here


  5. CES is just around the corner...

    by , 12-13-2012 at 02:06 PM

    Everyone's favorite resident reviewer here with a reminder that the 2013 Consumer Electronics Show is January 8-11th, just a few short weeks away! As always, mp3Car will be present and accounted for during all the shows events.

    As the tradition stands, we want your feedback on what to look forward to at the show. What gizmos, gadgets, and do-dads does the community have interest in? If you won't be in attendance this year, what can we showoff that you've been waiting for? Let's hear your thoughts!

    Updated 12-19-2012 at 07:57 AM by Sonicxtacy02

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    Technology Events , Product Reviews