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Thread: Kicker Subs

  1. #1
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    Kicker Subs

    hello i have a Kicker ZX Mono Class D 2ohm 1500.1 AMP

    i was wondering if it would work fine and sound good if i hooked up two Kicker S12L7 2ohm subs and parrell them to 2ohm to my amp.

    well would this hit hard?? does anyone have these subs?? will neighbors complain??

    thank you.

  2. #2
    Constant Bitrate ronjon228's Avatar
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    Are those dual voice coil subs? I'm fairly certain that all Kicker squares are DVC so assuming they are, yes a final impedance of 2ohms is attainable and should be very loud with that amp. I installed 1 L5 12" in my girls Cherokee and it's loud. Very loud for one sub.

    Heres what you need to do for a 2ohm final load:

    Wire the subs with the voice coils in SERIES. This will give you 4ohm impedance for each speaker. Then, run the subs together in parallel and there is your 2ohm final impedance.
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  3. #3
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    Re

    ah thanks for the fast reply, and yes they will be DVC.


    ok well im sorry cuz im new to all this so what exaclty do you mean by

    "Wire the subs with the voice coils in SERIES."

    and how do

    "run the subs together in parallel"


    ok and do you see the pic i uploaded?? some boxes have two of those (like the picture) and some only have one. so how would i hook it up depending on that?? sorry for all these strange questions as you can see i dont even know what those are called (in the pic)

    but any way thanks again.
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  4. #4
    Constant Bitrate ronjon228's Avatar
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    It depends. If the box has 1 terminal like that PER speaker (2 total for 2 subs), then it's already been wired in parallel or series inside the box. If they have 2 terminals PER speaker (4 total for 2 subs) then they are not wired internal and you can wire them which ever way you need, in your case series and then parallel. Let me know, because without knowing how many of those terminals there is for EACH speaker, I can't give you a definite answer.
    CarPC:
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  5. #5
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    Re

    there is one terminal per sub (2 total on box). so you said that means its already parallel or series?? again what does that mean or how would you know?

    so are you saying the box comes with wires not just the terminal? there are alot of sub boxes i found ill paste the link to one i liked

    http://www.klausaudio.com/shop/custo...ofer-boxes.php

    it has many options for the box. like with ports and without. would i want ports for each sub? and they are for sure serperated (well everyone says they should be seperated and the ports are optional) so what would you recommend?? thank you so much.

  6. #6
    Variable Bitrate
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    Refer to the instructions that come with the sub on how to wire the coils series or parallel...you'll want them in series. This will be done with short (4" or so, maybe less) jumper cables that connect between points at the back of the sub.

    Once you have that accomplished, each sub will have a connection to take the speaker leads away from the sub. Wire each of these to its own terminal on the sub box. Then, refer to your amp's instructions on how to connect your two 4-ohm loads in parallel to achieve 2-ohms, as presented to the amp.

    As to whether you want ports, ports (in general) are a way to make a sub much more efficient over a certain, narrow, often difficult to reproduce, frequency band. A ported speaker will (in general) hit harder with less power over the frequency range it is tuned for. Given that the ported speaker favors a certain narrow band in and around the frequency it is tuned for, it can (in general) be more difficult to tune to be "even" across a broad range of frequencies. Careful selection of the frequency the port is tuned for, taking into account the design of the speaker in the enclosure, as well as the response of the space it's going into (your car) along with careful application of tuning and engineering practices, can result in a ported subwoofer system that is very efficient with power and has an even response across a wide band of frequencies.

    A speaker in a sealed enclosure (in general) is not as efficient with power as one in a ported enclosure over the ported speaker's tuned frequency band. However, it can (in general) be easier to tune for an even sound across a wider band of frequencies. A sealed enclosure, imho, is definitely more "idiot proof" out of the box, requires much less tuning, and usually has less of a space requirement. (In general) if you get the volume of a sealed enclosure right, make sure the box is sturdy, and ensure air-tight seal, you're good. A speaker in a sealed enclosure will, however, (in general) have a greater requirement for power to achieve the same butt-rumbling lows a ported enclosure can be easily configured to put out.

    One may argue that since a given subwoofer's response curve is hardly even, from an objective standpoint, and with each car having a particular response of its own (interior of the car colors the sound) that placing a sub in a ported enclosure doesn't add any difficulty to the already difficult and variable-filled process of tuning, and that the efficiency gains are often well worth it. IMHO, the simple act of selecting a frequency to port to can only add complexity to the tuning process, but this isn't an argument with a definite answer for all people....it's simply a matter of system goals, taste, and know-how.

    My advice for you would be to look up, if possible, the manufacturer's recommendations with regard to a ported enclosure (usually, they will give you a design for a "reference" enclosure in both sealed and ported version), and compare/contrast this with the opinions of actual users (find some on the net, for example) and car audio specialists. Be aware that small differences in port/enclosure design can be huge in terms of output...if you don't know the answer to the question "how to port" by now, and you are buying a "generic" enclosure, I'd recommend a sealed enclosure at or very near the manufacturer's recommendation in terms of volume...it's just easier that way, if you don't plan on doing the research, and two adequately-powered 12"s in a sealed enclosure is generally more than enough for most people in terms of output. Also, beware the "quick sell" mentality, where a sales person will tell you only what you want to hear just to make a quick sale. Just because the hole in the enclosure is sized right for your speaker doesn't mean the box is right for your system, and the sales person should be able to discuss with you the parameters necessary to make that particular speaker sound good, and compare/contrast these with the requirements for speakers by other manufacturers.

    As an aside, car audio competitions can be divided into two basic categories: Sound Power Level (SPL) and Sound Quality (SQ). In a real world scenario, it is possible to have a loud system that sounds great in terms of sound quality...but those who want to achieve extreme loudness and win SPL contests must tune their setups to favor this or that frequency...power-wise, they put all their eggs in one basket, so to speak. Those who want extreme sound quality, on the other hand, must tune their system so that it doesn't favor any particular frequency...thus, it would be impossible with current technology, to simultaneously design for both extremes. So, don't believe people that say you can't have a loud system that sounds good...but believe them when they say you won't have the loudest system in town without some sacrifices in terms of quality.

    Edit: One last thing...Yes, it does matter if you mix up "+" and "-" wires, especially in a dual sub setup.
    I have too much time and too little aggravation in my life, so I built a carPC. ;)

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