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Thread: House Speakers In Vehicle

  1. #1
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    House Speakers In Vehicle

    I wanted to say hello as this is my first post. I found similar post in your forums. I work in the IT field but am not a guru in car audio. I have two sb-cr99 house speakers. I was interested in putting them into my vehicle to save having to buy subs. I don't believe they are driven by a built in amp, so I assumed this should be easier. They are rated at 8 ohms. What could I do to get them running? Here is a spec sheet on them (listed to far right). I'm really only interested in using the 15" subs. What type of equipment would you recommend if this is possible? Any advice would be appreciated.Thanks and have a great day.


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    House speakers in the main are 8ohm (as yours are).

    Car speakers and amps are generally anything from 1.2 to 4 ohm depending on manufaturer (4 ohm used to be the more common)


    What issues would this cause?

    Well the resistance of the house house speakers is higher, so it would need more power from the amp to get the same volume, which would put more stress on the amp.

    Depending on the quality of the amp and tolerances it may cause the amp to fail.


    You would need to check the specs of any amp you plan to use to see if it can handle 8ohms.

    I'm sure soundman will along soon to clarify more. (and probably disbunk the above)

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    John Boehner on the right, Nancy Pelosi on the left and then you......oh, not that kind of House Speaker?

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    Thanks. So essentially if I find a car amp that can handle 8 ohms I would be ok theoretically? I don't even know if these would sound ok as they are 200w by the spec sheet. I'm just tired of looking at them lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Enforcer View Post
    I'm sure soundman will along soon to clarify more. (and probably disbunk the above)
    apparently i'm a force to be reckoned with?

    Quote Originally Posted by Enforcer View Post
    House speakers in the main are 8ohm (as yours are).
    kind of-- while 8 ohm is a typical average, i've seen anything from 4-32 ohm speakers used in various locations in houses..

    Quote Originally Posted by Enforcer View Post
    Car speakers and amps are generally anything from 1.2 to 4 ohm depending on manufaturer (4 ohm used to be the more common)
    yep.


    Quote Originally Posted by Enforcer View Post
    What issues would this cause?

    Well the resistance of the house house speakers is higher, so it would need more power from the amp to get the same volume,
    correct so far. but the nifty thing about higher-ohm speakers is that they are more sensitive to different audio signals. so whatever you loose in raw output, you'll gain in clarity. for the most part, it is really hard to tell much of a difference between a few hundred watts of power, so at the level of this speakers case-- 200 watts, it's really not much of a issue-- a 4 ohm or 8 ohm sub is going to sound about the same.

    Quote Originally Posted by Enforcer View Post
    which would put more stress on the amp.
    actually, it's backwards. less resistance puts more strain on the amp, but more resistance makes the amp happier and run cooler. it is always ok to run a higher resistance then whatever the amp is rated for, but rarely ok to run a resistance lower then what they are rated for.

    Quote Originally Posted by Enforcer View Post
    Depending on the quality of the amp and tolerances it may cause the amp to fail.


    You would need to check the specs of any amp you plan to use to see if it can handle 8ohms.
    nah, just pick a amp that rated at roughly 200w rms at 4 ohms and run with it-- i don't believe there are even any car audio amps rated at 8 ohms anymore. they're all pretty much rated at 4 and 2 ohms..



    but with all that said, expect to get mediocre bass. i've done it in the past with a old set of h.h.scott 15" 3-ways i've got laying around, in the back of a truck.. it's alright bass, about what compares to any mid-grade 10" car audio sub in a correctly-sized box. i understand wanting to try to use what you've got on-hand, and they will work, but there are more efficient solutions that don't take up as much space, and get the same result

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    As stated above, higher impedance speakers are not an issue. It's only an issue if you use a speaker rated at LESS than the amps stable impedance. So if the amp is stable at 4 ohms, you can't run a 2 ohm speaker, but you can run 8 or even 16.

    Power = volts x amps
    Amps = volts / resistance

    So the higher the resistance the less current is required, so the less power is used.

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    Quote Originally Posted by soundman98 View Post

    kind of-- while 8 ohm is a typical average, i've seen anything from 4-32 ohm speakers used in various locations in houses..
    Hence I said 'In the main'




    Quote Originally Posted by soundman98 View Post


    actually, it's backwards. less resistance puts more strain on the amp, but more resistance makes the amp happier and run cooler. it is always ok to run a higher resistance then whatever the amp is rated for, but rarely ok to run a resistance lower then what they are rated for.
    I was also going to mention about less resistance as well, but I forgot about it whilst typing. duh!



    As an addendum, I have run Home speakers in the car on a few occaisions. But I was using an amp that was designed for either 4 or 8ohm speakers each time.

    I once had a Realistic Pro2 speaker in the back of an old Ford Sierra. But had to take it out as it make the number plate on the back rattle too much.

    Also heard of someone ripping the back seats out of a beatle and replacing them with two Realistic Mach Twos.

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    there is a way to solve the issue of having 8 ohms speakers hooked up to an 4ohm rated amp.

    here it goes,

    if you connect any 2 speakers in series (+ wire from amp ground to + wire of 2nd speaker and ground of 2nd speaker to amp) on one single channel you will double the resistance

    if you hook 2 speakers parallel on one single channel you will cut the resistance in half series being both sets of wires hooked up to a single channel.

    so if you connect both your speakers to one channel you should have a total of 4 ohms resistance.

    hope this helps


    p.s.

    this will work for all speakers provided you use 2 speakers with the same resistance, so dont go hooking up a 2 ohm and a 12 ohm speaker to one single channel hoping you get away with it because the 2 ohm speaker will blow and after that the amp will blow



    and the deal with resitance is as follows,


    the higher the resistance the more your amp has to work to get your speaker working

    BUT if you hook up a 2 ohm speaker to a 4 ohm amp you will have short life on your speaker, because the amp will demand too much from that speaker.

    it basically comes down to using the above if you want to hook up speaker rated different than your amp.

    for 2 ohm speakers on a 4 ohm amp you use series to double the resistance to 4 ohm

    for 8 ohm speakers you use parallel to cut the resistance in half

    all of this must be done on one channel , since all channels are rated in resistance seperately
    Last edited by eugenweij; 11-16-2012 at 07:43 PM. Reason: clarification
    View my worklog here

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    in addition to the above.

    It is not good practice to use just one channel of a two channel amp.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eugenweij View Post
    there is a way to solve the issue of having 8 ohms speakers hooked up to an 4ohm rated amp.

    here it goes,

    if you connect any 2 speakers in series (+ wire from amp ground to + wire of 2nd speaker and ground of 2nd speaker to amp) on one single channel you will double the resistance

    if you hook 2 speakers parallel on one single channel you will cut the resistance in half series being both sets of wires hooked up to a single channel.

    so if you connect both your speakers to one channel you should have a total of 4 ohms resistance.

    hope this helps


    p.s.

    this will work for all speakers provided you use 2 speakers with the same resistance, so dont go hooking up a 2 ohm and a 12 ohm speaker to one single channel hoping you get away with it because the 2 ohm speaker will blow and after that the amp will blow
    need to correct that last point-- you can connect any resistance to another resistance, but it is not recommended because the parameters of the speakers will be different-- the higher resistance speaker will have more voice coil windings in the magnetic gap, meaning they are more efficient at using lesser amounts of power.

    speaking strictly on a weather the setup will emit audio or not-- it will work-- in the example you listed, you'd connect them in series for a overall load of 14 ohms. connecting them in parallel should net a resistance of about 1.7 ohms, which is really too low for even 2-ohm stable amps.

    but audio-wise, it'd wreak havoc on the system, and there'd be a lot of peaks and cancellations throughout the spectrum over the speakers usable range, which is the main reason why you'd never want to use a setup like that.


    but because you'd hook them up in series, as long as both speakers were physically designed to handle the power of the amp, there would be no reason for anything to fail.



    Quote Originally Posted by eugenweij View Post
    and the deal with resitance is as follows,


    the higher the resistance the more your amp has to work to get your speaker working
    nope. it's the other way around. amps are always more comfortable with a higher resistance load then a lower resistance load.

    this is actually really easy to prove if you've got the extra equipment for it-- connect a high resistance load to a amp(connect a few 8 ohm speakers in series), and run it at a high level for a hour or 2. then let it cool down, and perform the same test with a single 4 ohm speaker for the same amount of time.

    the amp will be hotter with the 4 ohm speaker.



    Quote Originally Posted by eugenweij View Post
    BUT if you hook up a 2 ohm speaker to a 4 ohm amp you will have short life on your speaker, because the amp will demand too much from that speaker.
    opposite again
    a setup like this drastically affects the amps lifespan much more then the speakers lifespan, because the amp has to work 2x's as hard as it was rated to work.

    Quote Originally Posted by eugenweij View Post
    it basically comes down to using the above if you want to hook up speaker rated different than your amp.

    for 2 ohm speakers on a 4 ohm amp you use series to double the resistance to 4 ohm

    for 8 ohm speakers you use parallel to cut the resistance in half
    this only applies if you are attempting to perfectly match resistance to get a certain output level, or certain wattage. for the most part, it doesn't really matter, and the higher efficiency of higher-resistance speakers usually make up for most of the 'loss' that has occurred from the change in impedance.

    Quote Originally Posted by eugenweij View Post
    all of this must be done on one channel , since all channels are rated in resistance seperately
    that's a very broad statement, and a dangerous one at that. there are many amps that are bridgeable, many that aren't, and just as many mono-channel amps.

    if the amp is bridgeable, i recommend bridging it-- as long as you can meet the minimum resistance requirement, as it is typically double the normal, single channel output.

    but plain, and simple, it's not something that can be covered in a blanket statement-- it's something that should be covered with amp selection.

    Quote Originally Posted by Enforcer View Post
    in addition to the above.

    It is not good practice to use just one channel of a two channel amp.
    would you happen to have anything to back that up? i guess in theory it could cause issues with uneven thermal loading on a amp, but i can't seem to find any info right away that shows that using a single channel off a multi-channel amp negatively affects the amp, or the audio quality..

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