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Thread: amp keeps on blowing fuses

  1. #11
    Maximum Bitrate Sidewalksalvage's Avatar
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    Wow dunno really waht to say....

    You may want to take the amp out and hook it up to a AC-DC supply at home and run some tests like adjusting gain and stuff to see if its the unit or your wireing.

    If its the unit it will probably blow outside the car just as well as in

    if it doenst blow...then look further into whats happening in the car....

    Maybe try hooking it up to the other amp connections and see if the same thing occurs.....
    Brown 2010

  2. #12
    My Village Called 0l33l's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalksalvage
    Wow dunno really waht to say....

    You may want to take the amp out and hook it up to a AC-DC supply at home and run some tests like adjusting gain and stuff to see if its the unit or your wireing.

    If its the unit it will probably blow outside the car just as well as in

    if it doenst blow...then look further into whats happening in the car....

    Maybe try hooking it up to the other amp connections and see if the same thing occurs.....


    I'll turn the bass and gain all the way down and go from there. Will also double check the wires (yet again).

    So no one thinks its an impedence problem? How about the settings for LP and HP and Hz?

  3. #13
    Maximum Bitrate Sidewalksalvage's Avatar
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    Well waht is the ohm rateing for each sub?

    Is it in parallel or serial set up?

    Can the amp handle 2 ohms in bridged mode?

    if the subs are 4 ohms each and are in parallel they make up 2 ohms....

    but even all this.....

    usually its an over heating problem with impedence not an electrical...
    Brown 2010

  4. #14
    My Village Called 0l33l's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalksalvage
    Well waht is the ohm rateing for each sub?

    Is it in parallel or serial set up?

    Can the amp handle 2 ohms in bridged mode?

    if the subs are 4 ohms each and are in parallel they make up 2 ohms....

    but even all this.....

    usually its an over heating problem with impedence not an electrical...
    There is only one sub. Its a stock pioneer one. IIRC its either a 4Ohm or a 8Ohm sub.

    I just bridged it.

    Overheating..... ok.... I'll also check for that tomorrow.

  5. #15
    FLAC
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    You need a multimeter. Please read this thread: FAQ: Tools you must have to troubleshoot.

    Unplug the speaker wires and check the impedence. What do you get? Now check to see if you have the wires grounded by using the continuity checker of the meter.

    My guess is that the subs are wired at too low an impedence for the amp, the speakers are blown/shorted or somewhere the speaker wires are touching ground.

    This can also happen if one or two strands of speaker wire are touching the other terminal.

    If your ground is inadequate, the amp will pull more amperage to compensate. This will melt wires and pop fuses all the time.

    If all of these are kosher, then its your amp.

  6. #16
    My Village Called 0l33l's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Albers
    You need a multimeter. Please read this thread: FAQ: Tools you must have to troubleshoot.

    Unplug the speaker wires and check the impedence. What do you get? Now check to see if you have the wires grounded by using the continuity checker of the meter.

    My guess is that the subs are wired at too low an impedence for the amp, the speakers are blown/shorted or somewhere the speaker wires are touching ground.

    This can also happen if one or two strands of speaker wire are touching the other terminal.

    If your ground is inadequate, the amp will pull more amperage to compensate. This will melt wires and pop fuses all the time.

    If all of these are kosher, then its your amp.
    Yup... I've got a multimeter. Some cheap chinese kind, but its digital and it works. I did a continuity check on the cables, and they were good. I did get some continuity between the ground and the ACC wire though. But none between the positive and the ACC or the positive and the negative, on both amps. I checked the continuity between the speakers, and they give aroudn a 3.0. Same with the sub.

  7. #17
    FLAC Jahntassa's Avatar
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    If you're checking continuity, you generally don't get a 'reading', just a 'beep' or other indication that the circuit is completing.

    On many multimeters, the continuity function is an offshoot of the resistance meter, so you may have to hit buttons to get to the continuity part.

    When you say you 'checked continuity between the speakers', what do you mean?

    Also, when you say you got a 3.0, is that 3.0 Ohms? If your sub is running 3 Ohm, and you have it bridged to a 2 channel amp that probably can't handle less than 4 Ohms bridged, that may be your problem.

  8. #18
    My Village Called 0l33l's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jahntassa
    If you're checking continuity, you generally don't get a 'reading', just a 'beep' or other indication that the circuit is completing.

    On many multimeters, the continuity function is an offshoot of the resistance meter, so you may have to hit buttons to get to the continuity part.

    When you say you 'checked continuity between the speakers', what do you mean?

    Also, when you say you got a 3.0, is that 3.0 Ohms? If your sub is running 3 Ohm, and you have it bridged to a 2 channel amp that probably can't handle less than 4 Ohms bridged, that may be your problem.
    The sub should be able to handle 4Ohms, as it says in the manual. It should do 120w @ 4Ohms bridged.

    My multimeter does not have a buzzer
    What I mean when I said that I 'checked continuity between the speakers' is that I checked the continuity between the speakers at the terminals at the amps, and that's what I got. There are a few ways to check the continuity, and I forgot which setting I had it at.

  9. #19
    FLAC
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0l33l
    The sub should be able to handle 4Ohms, as it says in the manual. It should do 120w @ 4Ohms bridged.

    My multimeter does not have a buzzer
    What I mean when I said that I 'checked continuity between the speakers' is that I checked the continuity between the speakers at the terminals at the amps, and that's what I got. There are a few ways to check the continuity, and I forgot which setting I had it at.
    Most 4 ohm speakers read at 3.2to 4.x. Just weirdness of the meter i guess.

    So you disconnected the speaker wires at the amp and tested them disconnected? If we ignore the beeper, and just check impedence between a single speaker wire and a ground, do you get anything? Try both wires.

  10. #20
    Maximum Bitrate Sidewalksalvage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jahntassa
    If you're checking continuity, you generally don't get a 'reading', just a 'beep' or other indication that the circuit is completing.

    On many multimeters, the continuity function is an offshoot of the resistance meter, so you may have to hit buttons to get to the continuity part.

    When you say you 'checked continuity between the speakers', what do you mean?

    Also, when you say you got a 3.0, is that 3.0 Ohms? If your sub is running 3 Ohm, and you have it bridged to a 2 channel amp that probably can't handle less than 4 Ohms bridged, that may be your problem.
    He is using a resistance meter for continuity. and 3 is most likely the resistance of the speaker. Which probably means 4 becasue of mis calibration of the meter (cheap chinese crap says it all)

    I say check all the contacts between the speakers and the amp as well. Are the contacts a crimpped connector or straight wire? If its not a crimmped connector try one so that it makes a nice clean connection.
    Brown 2010

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