Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38

Thread: amp keeps on blowing fuses

  1. #21
    FLAC
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,109
    Actually, speaker impedance ratings are nominal which means they average out the highs and lows of average speaker production and round to the nearest whole number. Lots of things change impedance on a speaker: enclosure, heat, etc.

    Crimped connections are also notorious for making bad connections. Twisting, soldering and taping is the best method for a nice clean connection.

  2. #22
    Maximum Bitrate Sidewalksalvage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    NJ/RI
    Posts
    826
    Ahh ic...that makes sense

    Just a side note, For covering a soldered connection, i think a heat shrink is better...in the heat the tape's glue can melt and potentially expose the wire...

    But i do agree soldered connections are MUCH better than crimmped...especially impropperly crimped conections.
    Brown 2010

  3. #23
    My Village Called 0l33l's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Berkeley, CA
    Posts
    10,516
    I think I've solved the problem. The problem was that the gain was up way too high. I reset all of the settings, and I'm happy with the way it sounds now. It also hasn't blown a fuse today, which is good

  4. #24
    FLAC
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    Posts
    904
    Quote Originally Posted by 0l33l
    I think I've solved the problem. The problem was that the gain was up way too high. I reset all of the settings, and I'm happy with the way it sounds now. It also hasn't blown a fuse today, which is good

    Hmmm, i dont think i have ever ran into this problem, i.e. gains causing a fuse to pop. I still think something is up.

  5. #25
    Maximum Bitrate Sidewalksalvage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    NJ/RI
    Posts
    826
    Sounds odd.....

    But hey you never know theres a first for everything!

    Let us know if the fuse pops again!
    Brown 2010

  6. #26
    FLAC Jahntassa's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Conyers, GA
    Posts
    1,417
    I still think that factory sub isn't running at 4 Ohm, so if the gains are up 'high' it's overloading the amp and popping the fuse.. I can't imagine any meter being off by an entire ohm unless it's the crappiest piece of crap that's ever crapped..but that's just me.

    At least you got it working!

  7. #27
    Maximum Bitrate Sidewalksalvage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    NJ/RI
    Posts
    826
    It could be a the crappies crap that ever crapped....or it could be adjusted improperly....

    Isnt the sub a pioneer. I dont think they would make something that didnt work all that well....and i have never heard of a 3 ohm sub.... but hey you never know..

    But thats true if the sub over works i guess it could pop the fuse...
    Brown 2010

  8. #28
    FLAC is for flaccid parksgm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    1,119
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Albers
    You need a multimeter. Please read this thread: FAQ: Tools you must have to troubleshoot.

    If your ground is inadequate, the amp will pull more amperage to compensate. This will melt wires and pop fuses all the time.
    How? If the ground is insufficient, doesn't that mean that excess current CAN'T flow...the voltage is a function of the car's electrical system, and the current the amp draws is dependent on its ability to return that current to the electrical system. If the ground is "insufficient", then the circuit would function much like it was partially open.

    I think the more likely scenario was one of those described above.. internal short or low impedance.

  9. #29
    Maximum Bitrate Sidewalksalvage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    NJ/RI
    Posts
    826
    Quote Originally Posted by parksgm
    How? If the ground is insufficient, doesn't that mean that excess current CAN'T flow...the voltage is a function of the car's electrical system, and the current the amp draws is dependent on its ability to return that current to the electrical system. If the ground is "insufficient", then the circuit would function much like it was partially open.

    I think the more likely scenario was one of those described above.. internal short or low impedance.
    yeah exactly a bad ground causes bad flow...

    Therefore to compensate for its lack of flow...the amp trys to pull more thinking (well it doesnt think...just how the electricity reacts..) to push through the backup....

    hence to much amperage enters and the fuse goes POP (rember the simple physics equation Voltage = Amperage x Resistance ... therefore bad ground causes higher resistance...for the amp to push the right voltage it needs more amperage...)

    i think i did my math right...correct me if im wrong...
    Brown 2010

  10. #30
    FLAC is for flaccid parksgm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    1,119
    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalksalvage
    yeah exactly a bad ground causes bad flow...

    Therefore to compensate for its lack of flow...the amp trys to pull more thinking (well it doesnt think...just how the electricity reacts..) to push through the backup....

    hence to much amperage enters and the fuse goes POP (rember the simple physics equation Voltage = Amperage x Resistance ... therefore bad ground causes higher resistance...for the amp to push the right voltage it needs more amperage...)

    i think i did my math right...correct me if im wrong...
    Your math is correct (that's the correct equation)...I'm just not sure that's how it works. I don't know enough about amplification to know if an amp can "pull" current without being grounded. In my opinion, the fixed, higher resistance of a bad ground, and the fixed voltage mean that the amperage CANNOT go above a certain value.

    To prove this, consider the an ungrounded amp. An ungrounded amp can also be thought of as an amp with a infinitely high resistance. In that case, no current can flow, no matter the input signal, because the voltage cannot overcome the infinitely high resistance back to the battery.

    Now, imagine lowering the resistance away from infinity toward zero at a fixed input voltage. The amount of current that can flow steadily increases as the resistance drops, until eventually the resistance is low enough that enough current can flow at 12 V to sufficiently amplify the input signal of the amp.

    Finally, imagine that the resistance from the amplifier's ground post to the ground itself approaches zero. The amp doesn't simply draw infinitely increasing amounts of current because it the ground resistance is low...it only draws as much current as is needed to amplify the signal. The input signal in fact determines how much current the amp draws. The resistance in this case is the work that the current is doing to amplify the input signal of the amp and the heat generate through inefficiencies in the circuit.

    ...conceptually, the above makes sense to me, but I've been wrong before. Anyone out there with an electronics degree that can prove/disprove this? I'm a fourth year medical student, so I'll answer any burning health questions you throw at me in reply.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Amp running hot...??
    By Emerica2843 in forum General Hardware Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-08-2006, 06:40 PM
  2. Amp running hot...??
    By Emerica2843 in forum Car Audio
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-29-2006, 08:29 PM
  3. low amp fuse blowing in MX radio adaptor
    By march09 in forum Car Audio
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-06-2006, 06:53 PM
  4. Blowing amp fuses!!!
    By capricedaddy21 in forum Car Audio
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-29-2005, 02:58 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •