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Thread: Eliminating Ground Loop

  1. #11
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    Yes I installed it, I just put it on the same stock ground in the wiring harness that the old stereo was on.

    I'll have a look for wiring diagrams.

  2. #12
    FLAC
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    If you connected it to another wire, disconnect it and ground it DIRECTLY to the chassis.

  3. #13
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    Ok I'll try that.

    On another note my audio in general can get terribly distorted.

    I have a 4 x 45w headunit, with Pioneer 110w 4" front speakers on the headunit, and 2 330w 6x9 speakers running off a 2x200w amplifier in the back.

    The volume control on the headunit goes upto 47, if I have it around 30 or above everything is terribly distorted and I don't know why, all the connections are good, cables are good, the speaker are rated above the output of the headunit so should be able to cope.

    Any ideas on that one, oh great one?

  4. #14
    FLAC
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    That's because you're clipping the amplifier in the radio. If you keep it up you'll blow your speakers with less than half of their rated wattage.

    If you want louder, get an amp.

    Also check your gains. They're probably not set correctly.

  5. #15
    FLAC
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    Quote Originally Posted by norbie
    Ok I'll try that.

    On another note my audio in general can get terribly distorted.

    I have a 4 x 45w headunit, with Pioneer 110w 4" front speakers on the headunit, and 2 330w 6x9 speakers running off a 2x200w in the back.

    The volume control on the headunit goes upto 47, if I have it around 30 or above everything is terribly distorted and I don't know why, all the connections are good, cables are good, the speaker are rated above the output of the headunit so should be able to cope.

    Any ideas on that one, oh great one?

    So so wrong on many levels but its not your fault. Its a common misconception that a speaker with a higher rating can handle anything a lesser powered amp can send at it. This is incorrect. What you are experiencing is distortion. Distortion will kill a speaker whether its 10 watts or 1000. In fact I could blow up a 100 watt speaker with that head unit easily.

    All head units have distortion right about at the level you are experiencing. If you have the loud button and eq anywhere but flat, that distortion will kick in much sooner.

    Do a search on this forum for distortion. You may want to read posts that talk about overpowering a speaker vs underpowering. Lots of good knowledge to pick up.

  6. #16
    FLAC
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    Ha! I beat you. It's clipping.

  7. #17
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    So clipping is another word for distortion and there's nothing I can do to eliminate it other than keeping volume down?

  8. #18
    FLAC
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    Clipping is when the amplifier can't keep up with the output that's demanded of it.
    The normal audio wave is sinus like this:


    Whereas an overdriven signal causes a clipped sine wave, like this:


    The output transistors of the amplifier can't supply any more voltage and they max out clipping the tops off of the sine wave. The more and more you clip the output, the more it looks like a square wave.


    Square wave audio is okay to play through speakers. Because the speaker is producing a sound that's supposed to look like that. These are popular in synthesized music but you'd probably recognize them more from older 8 and 16 bit video games.
    Example

    A clipped sine is HORRIBLE for a speaker. It acts more like a digital signal than an analog signal and the speaker's suspension is thrown for a loop. Being held still at either end of the throw heats up the coil a LOT and will eventually burn out a speaker, and then the amplifier usually follows.

    As stated in my first post:
    Get an amp if you want to be louder. Your gains on your existing amp are probably set incorrectly. There's information in one of the stickies that details this process.

  9. #19
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    I'll take a look, thankyou very much for your help on all of this (and Will Albers)

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow View Post
    Clipping is when the amplifier can't keep up with the output that's demanded of it.
    The normal audio wave is sinus like this:


    Whereas an overdriven signal causes a clipped sine wave, like this:


    The output transistors of the amplifier can't supply any more voltage and they max out clipping the tops off of the sine wave. The more and more you clip the output, the more it looks like a square wave.


    Square wave audio is okay to play through speakers. Because the speaker is producing a sound that's supposed to look like that. These are popular in synthesized music but you'd probably recognize them more from older 8 and 16 bit video games.
    Example

    A clipped sine is HORRIBLE for a speaker. It acts more like a digital signal than an analog signal and the speaker's suspension is thrown for a loop. Being held still at either end of the throw heats up the coil a LOT and will eventually burn out a speaker, and then the amplifier usually follows.

    As stated in my first post:
    Get an amp if you want to be louder. Your gains on your existing amp are probably set incorrectly. There's information in one of the stickies that details this process.
    Shadow, I'm curious- You say it's okay to play a square wave through speakers, but not a clipped signal. I thought a clipped signal or a square wave both indroduce a DC voltage at the point that it clips, thereby heating up the voicecoil and causing it to burn up. I would like to hear why you think it's ok. I know during DB drags they do play mildly clipped signals to increase loudness, but the subwoofers used are built like tanks and can handle the abuse.
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