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Thread: 2004 Grand Prix GTP CompG Engine Swap

  1. #1
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    2004 Grand Prix GTP CompG Engine Swap

    This is where I'm going to log the extraction and transplanting of a 3800 Series III supercharged engine in my 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix GTP CompG.

    All the posts in the "Random" thread that pertain to this project will be copied or moved to this thread for the sake of organization. I wouldn't want the Random thread getting cluttered now.

    The point of this is to hopefully provide some knowledge and information for other people attempting a similar project.

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    Here's what we're starting with.

    First, the exterior:
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    The car is dirty. Hasn't been washed in 8 months. The rear tires have gone flat. Probably from rim-leaks. Pot-holes were really bad the year before last.

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    I love these white grilles against the black car. They set it apart without looking retarded like neon green.

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    The body is in decent shape. Some rust where paint chipped off around the wheel-wells from rocks, and a door-ding or two, but no major exterior issues.

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    GTP CompG. Me-ow. The sexiest of the Grand Prix's.

    And under the hood:

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    Looks like the shop pulled the plugs to check for coolant (from a blown gasket).

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    Good thing I probably won't need them.

  3. #3
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    Big Tools

    Turns out, you need more than just a socket set to get this job done. Here's what I've bought so far. I'll add more to this post as I buy more.


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    Here's the engine stand. 1000 lb max. I think this cost like $60. Kinda wish I'd gotten the 2000 lb instead.

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    And here's the engine hoist. Just in case I decide to pull the engine out the bottom, it's strong enough to lift the entire car (4000 lb). I think this was around $200.

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    I bought a creeper. But the car sits low to the ground. So even on jack-stands, there isn't a lot of room underneath the car. $30.

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    I also got a second set of jack stands in case I needed to have the car up on 4 jack stands for some reason. $30?
    I removed the front wheels and placed them under the car as a sort of insurance package. I really don't want to die under a car.


    So far, all the tools have come from Harbor Freight. I'd never even heard of Harbor Freight before. Cool store full of tools and outdoors stuff. I also got a cool magnesium fire-starter for like two bucks. I totally took a paper towel, ground some magnesium shavings onto it, and then struck the flint to make a spark and set that ***** on fire. I'm pretty much Bear Grylls now.
    Last edited by ClockWorK; 05-29-2015 at 08:47 AM.

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    First steps. Exhausting.

    Here's a quick recap of what's been done. Most of what's been done to this point is basic nuts-and-bolts stuff that can be done with a basic wrench set. 10mm, 13mm, 15mm mostly. Sometimes open-end, sometimes socket. Just depends on location.


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    This is how it looks before I start doing anything.


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    On the driver's side, I removed the support-bar (prolly has a more technical name) holds down the airbox. Anyone who has ever played with their air intake on one of these cars knows it well. 2 bolts above the radiator, and one by the fender. Easy stuff. Then I took off the intake. First, disconnect the MAF sensor wire and the EGR tube. On this car, the PCM/ECM/BCM are in the airbox. A tiny (8mm I think) socket with extension will get the 2 long (long) bolts out of the airbox. Open the air box and set aside the PCM/ECM/BCM, and proceed to remove the air intake all the way to the throttle body. Again, this shouldn't be too hard or scary.

    I also removed the upper motor-mounts. Not sure if I have pictures. Again, it's just bolts, but I recommend having a magnetic tool to grab any bolts that fall into the frame around the radiator. The upper motor-mounts need to be removed to gain access to the front exhaust manifold.


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    Time to remove the front exhaust manifold. It's gotta come off eventually. Or having it off of the engine should at least make this easier. Again, it's just nuts and bolts. I recommend finding all the bolts that need to come off and giving them all a few good shots of WD-40 the night before. You may need to hit them with WD-40 many times and just come back to it in an hour after letting it soak. The heat-shield (looks like tin foil) needs to come off, and there are a couple spots like the one in the picture above that need to be unbolted. The piece is flexible.


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    When completed, this is what I've got.


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    And now with the front exhaust manifold removed, we can see the AC compressor (or maybe AC pump?) on the left with 2 large lines coming out of it, and some other things (the starter maybe). The plan is to leave the AC and power-steering stuff in the car, meaning disconnect it from the engine block and not disconnect the lines to these components. Maybe time to start looking at that electrical loom that goes across the top of the engine, and all around it.


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    The hood has been removed. To summarize that process, it's just 4 bolts. The brackets DO NOT come off the car. The hood must be removed from the brackets. It's not really a one-man job.
    There's a towel covering one fender. I don't use dark colored towels. I like to see the grease and blood.
    You can see the catch-pan under the car to catch fluids (oil, coolant, etc). The clamps on the coolant return hose are tight and can be hard to get to, so when you finally get the clamp off, it's like winning the superbowl because you get soaked in gross orange fluid (coolant) if you're under the car.
    Last edited by ClockWorK; 06-01-2015 at 09:31 PM.

  5. #5
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    Did some simple things today.


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    First, I went out and picked up a 'Fuel Line Quick Disconnect Tool". This is used to disconnect the high-pressure fuel-line.

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    The fuel line initially has a clip on it that can be removed by hand.

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    After removing the clip, the fuel line looks like this. The larger (3/8 i think) side of the tool goes around the line, and into the flared part of the connection. Once inserted all the way (you might hear a 'click'), the two lines can be pulled apart.

    WARNING: The fuel line is normally pressurized. If the line is pressurized when you disconnect it, you are going to get covered in gasoline.
    The recommended procedure to de-pressurize it is to remove the fuse to the fuel-pump and start the car and let it run until it dies. Google this before doing it.
    I didn't have to worry. My car battery has been dead for months.
    Still, some fuel will come out of the lines, so have a rag or two on-hand.


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    After that, I decided to drain the oil, and remove the oil filter. In case you've never drained oil from a car, just place a catch-pan under the bolt in the bottom of your oil pan. Remove the bolt. Oil flows into pan. Replace bolt. The oil filter is easy enough to get to. I looked at it. Looks sparkly. Bits of metal perhaps?


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    The oil-filter housing sticks out a couple inches beyond the pulleys on the passenger side of the engine, farther than anything else on that side.. So, I've read that removing the oil filter housing from the engine block will make things easier. Maybe tomorrow.


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    I removed the oil dip-stick tube. Pretty much just grab it and start wiggling and twisting until it pops out. It doesn't appear to be threaded, but I used a twisting motion to get it out.


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    I removed a nut and a long bolt holding the AC compressor onto the engine block. Not sure if there are more bolts, but the compressor didn't move, so there must be a bolt or two underneath.

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    The exhaust crossover isn't going well. I probably made a mistake by removing one bolt before getting the other one loose. Because of this, when I tried to turn the second bolt, it turned (torqued) a piece of shielding as it turned. On top of that, the nut (stud?) on the second bolt came off.

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    So now I don't have anything to turn the second bolt with. There's another nut on it, but I'll need a deep-well 13mm socket to have a chance at it.

    Still working on the electrical loom. The oil temp sensor (or maybe oil pressure sensor) plug doesn't want to disconnect, and I don't want to break it. So I'm trying to be patient. Also still trying to follow the loom between the firewall and the rear exhaust manifold.

    Speaking of exhaust... No idea how I'm going to remove the exhaust at this point. I can't even imagine getting my hands on the bolts that connect to the downpipe. Let alone a wrench.

  6. #6
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    How about unbolting the manifolds at the heads and leave the pipes attached for now, Is there room?


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    If I can get to the bolts on the rear manifold at all, I'll be impressed. The front ones were hard enough to get off, and I could actually see them and get leverage on them. I don't know how anyone works on the back side of this engine.

  8. #8
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    Are you aware that the engine rolls forward once you remove those 2 Wishbones at the top front of the engine?


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    The engine rocked backwards about two or 3 inches when I removed the dogbones. Now that you mention it though, I think I remember reading that there's a way to rock it forward (more forward than normal) and then lock it in place.

  10. #10
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    2004 Grand Prix GTP CompG Engine Swap

    Just use a ratchet strap with one hook on something solid in the rear of the engine and the other on something solid on the header panel. If your going to be working with you hands down I behind the motor, come up with something to secure the engine like a block of wood or something in case the strap breaks


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