Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 59

Thread: HOWTO: Building a removable LCD screen bezel and mount

  1. #1
    Maximum Bitrate gork's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Amarillo, TX
    Posts
    655

    HOWTO: Building a removable LCD screen bezel and mount

    Below is a writeup I have been refining on people who unsuspectingly PM me about my screen bezel and get back a novella. It has helped a number of people build bezels so far, and I think it's in good enough shape to be generally useful as a tutorial on how such a thing can be built for other cars. The same methods I used are going to be very similar in any car, and the end result is a screen that you can access easily for maintenance without disassembling your entire dash. This kind of mount may not work in all cars, but should work in anything with about a double-DIN.

    First, if you want to build a bezel yourself, make sure you keep in mind that it will take a LONG time. It took me over 40 working hours to build my bezel. If you hack it out in a couple of hours/days, you're just not going to get a good result unless you have done it a hundred times. I had never done anything like this before, but I am good at building things and working with tools, so you can probably get a good estimate of it taking your longer than 40 hours or less than 40 hours based on your own skills and experience. Anyone can do this if you have enough patience and motivation. Just think of it as working with play-dough that hardens into rock 5 minutes after you take it out of the can. You can always file it down and you can always build it back up if you don't get it right the first time.

    BUY OR BORROW A RESPIRATOR WITH A FILTER BEFORE WORKING WITH BONDO OR FIBERGLASS. YOU DO NOT WANT TO BREATHE RESIN FUMES, FIBERGLASS DUST, OR PLASTIC PARTICLES. THIS IS ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL. A DUST MASK IS NOT AN ADEQUATE FILTER!

    The way I constructed my bezel was to take the front half of the LCD monitor housing off of the LCD and spray some of that spray-in foam insulation around it. I then carved it to a rough shape like I wanted it to end up that would fit into the place in the dash where the radio and climate controls were.





    Next, I put a layer of fiberglass-reinforced bondo over this.




    I then rough filed the fiberglass bondo to shape.



  2. #2
    Maximum Bitrate gork's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Amarillo, TX
    Posts
    655
    I repeated this process three or four more times, each time removing some of the (not very sturdy) foam insulation and filling it in with more bondo..






    Each time between filing and the next coat, you want to see how your fitment is so that you can apply more/less bondo in the right spots.



    At this point, I had a rough frame, but obviously it's not going to sit in there by itself, so I had to make some mounts for it. I bent up some pieces of metal to mold into it that would fit the right places on the dash to hold the bezel securely. Here you can see how the mounts are configured. They are secured into the bezel by putting them down into wet bondo and letting it set around the metal in place.



  3. #3
    Maximum Bitrate gork's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Amarillo, TX
    Posts
    655
    When setting the mounts, to make sure they were in exactly the right place, I put the bezel into the car while I let the bondo harden. I protected the dash from leaky bondo with a layer of foil. After it hardened, the mounts were in exactly the right spot.



    Now, I had a pretty sturdy frame that would mount in my dash, but it was still pretty rough. I used lightweight bondo from here on out to get the final shape. It is much softer and easier to work with than the fiberglass-reinforced stuff. I essentially repeated applying and filing/sanding until I had the exact shape that I wanted. After the shape was perfect, I applied little dabs of bondo to fill in the last little pockmarks and then dry sanded it down to 400 grit and wet sanded down to 1000 grit to get a perfectly smooth surface ready for painting.





  4. #4
    Maximum Bitrate gork's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Amarillo, TX
    Posts
    655
    For painting, first you need a layer of primer. Put on a nice coat and then sand it according to the directions on the particular primer you use. After primer and sanding, your trim part should have a finish that feels as smooth as glass. ANY IMPERFECTIONS WILL MAGNIFY THEMSELVES IN THE FINAL PAINTING SO TAKE THE TIME TO GET IT RIGHT! Don't forget to put some masking tape around your mounts so that you don't get primer all over them.



    For the final painting, I tried to use some 'wrinkle paint' I found at the auto parts store. It produced a very cool kind of finish, but it was inappropriate for the interior of my car. I would recommend this kind of thing for engine valve covers or fluid caps in the engine compartment, but it was terrible on an LCD bezel




    Anyway, I removed it with some paint thinner before it dried completely and started painting again.. This time I tried some flat black over a lighter coat of texture paint in hopes that it would soften the texture quite a bit and make it much less shiny. The result was so horrible I didn't even take a photo of it.

    Try #3 at painting -- I asked some questions and did some research this time and got a can of SEM texutre paint (Try a local bumper shop to find this stuff). I experimented with this stuff on a peice of metal I had to learn how to make various textures with it. You should probably do this yourself to see how to paint with the stuff before you paint your trim piece. I found a couple light coats of the stuff from a medium distance produces a result that matches the OEM BMW dash texutre pretty well (but is not quite the right lustre). A few light coats of Krylon Ultra-Flat black did the trick, and it looks almost 100% OEM. Again, don't forget to tape up your mounting brackets!




    All that was left was to mount the LCD back into the bezel and put it in the car!




    Thus, ends my saga of making a removable screen mount! Hope this is helpful,

    John
    MY CAR IS FOR SALE!
    See My Project Page for Details - 2003 BMW E46 ///M3
    Custom Dash Monitor Housing - OEM Fitment
    Custom Overhead DVD-ROM Housing in Headliner
    BMW I-Bus Integration
    My homepage with many other fun projects!

  5. #5
    Maximum Bitrate d_sellers1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    856
    Very nice write up. I like the fact that you included a lot of pics. This is going to come in handy in the (hopefully) near future. The finished product looks very nice. Thanks.

    Derek
    Progress [||-------]
    View my Worklog to see some of my progress.
    Downgraded Progress - Starting with another car... 09/13/06

  6. #6
    Raw Wave rando's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Redondo Beach, CA
    Posts
    1,973
    Holy ***** that is pimp!

  7. #7
    Raw Wave hijinks21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Posts
    1,803
    nice walkthrough.. I made this a sticky so its easily found
    '98 Explorer Sport
    http://mp3car.zcentric.com (down atm)
    AMD 800mhz 192megs RAM 60gig hard drive 9 inch widescreen VGA
    80% done

  8. #8
    Underachiever ACHIEVER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Up in dat ass Ranking: Mr. 25,000!!! :) Posts: 10000 +
    Posts
    586
    Looks like you put alot of work into it but man is that nice!!!!!!!

  9. #9
    Maximum Bitrate gork's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Amarillo, TX
    Posts
    655
    hyjinks21: thanks for making it sticky. I hope it is useful to everyone.

    Also, thanks to everyone for the compliments. It's a lot of work to build this, but it's fun and very simple to do. I hadn't ever done anything like this before, and although it takes quite a long time, the only skill you really need to do the work is patience.
    MY CAR IS FOR SALE!
    See My Project Page for Details - 2003 BMW E46 ///M3
    Custom Dash Monitor Housing - OEM Fitment
    Custom Overhead DVD-ROM Housing in Headliner
    BMW I-Bus Integration
    My homepage with many other fun projects!

  10. #10
    Maximum Bitrate d_sellers1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    856

    Post Download this tutorial

    For those of you who are interested, I've complied this tutorial into a Microsoft Word Document. This will make it easier to download and keep and to print out. (Images have been reduced to 75% which made it 4 pages shorter.)

    Code:
    http://www.geocities.com/d_sellers1/HOWTO_-_Building_a_removeable_LCD_screen_bezel_and_mount.doc
    http://www.geocities.com/d_sellers1/..._and_mount.doc
    Filesize: 512kb
    Link checked: 22May05 (from Iraq)

    Derek
    Progress [||-------]
    View my Worklog to see some of my progress.
    Downgraded Progress - Starting with another car... 09/13/06

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Dash mount screen in GM Chevy Tahoe
    By slushieken in forum LCD/Display
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-19-2006, 04:31 PM
  2. ibm thinkpad lcd screen
    By c a m a r o in forum LCD/Display
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-27-2004, 03:57 PM
  3. mount LCD w/o housing - lilliput 619
    By cybermob2 in forum LCD/Display
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-04-2004, 04:14 PM
  4. Where to get a ceiling bezel for 7" LCD
    By NightHunter in forum LCD/Display
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-21-2004, 04:18 PM
  5. Before you use foam to mount your Touch Screen
    By NewTechFool in forum LCD/Display
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-05-2004, 02:33 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •