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Thread: False floor

  1. #21
    Constant Bitrate john94587's Avatar
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    Pics, Pics, Pics, and Pics.

  2. #22
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    done. I'm uploading them now, and Ill do a little commentary about them. some are large, but Im sure you guys wont mind after you see them. this post here is just to bump the thread to get some exposure before I add the build up and finish photos.

  3. #23
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    This is the base. Now, I happen to like someone's above post, who used foam and wood and made his divisions permanent. in many ways, its LIGHTER than this, and in the end, is one of the lightest ways I know to put a subwoofer in a car. The metal of the car becomes part of the box! I usually use caulk rather than foam, but his way is stronger. Your choice.

    This guy wanted a box he could jsut lift out of the car. So we needed that fiberglass down there.

    youll also notice big squares of texture. We used a roving here due to its price versus bulk fiberglass value. It has an inherrent pinhole problem. We solved that by first laying up a sheet of weave fiberglass. 4 ounce, 6 ounce, 8 ounce, doesnt matter. Its the stuff you can get at home depot. very fine cloth. That won't pinhole on you, and forms compound corners. Once we had that layer on and cured (dont remove it!), Then we simply layed on ALL our roving on at once. built it up very thick, very fast.

    next thing you notice is the frame is 1x3's on their side. we needed that height to do what we wanted aesthetically. You can lay them on their faces. Or use 1x2's. or use 2x4's. Or cut strips of MDF. whatever. Its up to you to figure out what frame you need for what purpose. When a customer wants to save AS MUCH trunkfloorspace as possible, I'll just use shallow depth subwoofers and cut MDF for the frame, so I minimize how high the floor gets lifted.





    Next step. We put the baffles on for a subwoofer and amplifier and stretched our cloth over. this is blue light special cloth from a fabric store. all we cared about was stretchy in two directions. This was allowed to cure before we put glass over it. trying to glass this all at once would make our surface sag.

    you also see now why we chose such a high lift to the floor.

    everything between the original tub and that cloth is the "box". everything above is "wasted space".






    We actually left the box like this. If you want to make this part look good, be my guest. We were on a budget though, so we made the parts you can see look good, and didnt give a rats arse about the part you cant see. To this day, thats about what the functional box looks like. ugly! Here's the rest:






    I like the flush mount look. I dont like wires, I dont like screw holes, I dont like screw heads. period. So this project was designed to hide ALL that. Unfortunately, that was difficult to "plan", so we just did our trim piece in-situ, using 4 mil plastic to protect the gear. I've had issues with both tape and foil. plastic? never!

  4. #24
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    Give it a little rough trim, and take a few pictures.




    Now, since this is just trim, its not structural. I layed one layer of cloth fiberglass for a little bulk and crack protection, and called it a day. It was very important to me not to have bumps due to squares of matting or roving edges. that would just be a pain to sand out, and as we all know by now, the less finish sanding we do, the better!

    VERY light weight bondo and roughsand, feather the corners, fill woodgrain, and we end up with our basic trim. now, here is our progress so far:


    the hole is the plug the spare tire bolted to. We would have punched a hole through the cone if we left it, so out it came. chances are, you can leave yours. Plus, leaving it is less of a corrosion nightmare. thank god we live in the west coast, and dont have to worry about road salt!


    Told you it was ugly. to this very day, it looks that bad


    But you can't even tell. almost looks good now, doesnt it? We could run 0/1 gauge wire to that amp, and 8 gauge to the sub, and you wouldnt even know it. pretty much.


    Here is the next real step. its SUPER IMPORTANT to put TWO small seams to the sides, rather than one big seam in the middle. three pieces may seem like a worse idea than two, but its easier to get into your trunk, and the seams are in a less conspicuous area! your eyes will thank you. I promise.


    this pic is to just show what it was gonna look like to folks peering into this car. owner didnt want to tint his car, so stealth was KEY! but you can already see how showy and flashy and COOL this install is, despite its utter stealth. Who says you cant have the best of both worlds




    carpet the floor with ONE piece of carpet, and the carpet is the hinge. thats my other pet peeve. hinges are ugly. seams are ugly. dont have either. speaking of seams, theres one in that pic above. can you imagine how bad that would look if it was front row center? yuck!

  5. #25
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    after smoothing though, it looks much better.






    Prime the trim piece, and you have yourself a showier than hell install. The plan was to prime, then paintmatch to the car. Gorgeous pearl white. The owner liked the primer gray look so much with the gray carpet of the floor, matching the stock gray carpet of the trunk sidewalls and back seat, he chose to leave it like that!

    cost savings, yet looks *****in'. I couldnt ask for anything more. Besides, that paint is expensive!


    Now, I mentioned grilles. Its a subwoofer. So you dont need grille cloth. However, I followed the proceedure for making a grille for the sub that calls for using grille cloth, which is elastic. so, uh, this happened. thats not showy!

    Besides, what if he threw something back there? that could sink into the saggy top, and ruin the gear underneath. So we needed a more robust and strong floor.

    so we stole some perforated aluminum from the local university, and cut sections to suspend over the holes where the fabric sagged. restretched, and here are the results:





    I dont think we could have asked for better results.

  6. #26
    Constant Bitrate Specimen's Avatar
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    Nice, very clean. I want to do that to my mustang but there's no room in the trunk cause it’s a convertible
    PROGRESS [==========-] 99.9% <- Are we ever really actually done with our carPCs?

  7. #27
    My man uses Levitra. Peoples's Avatar
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    awesome pics....curious what the perferated aluminum looks like, but i guess thats not too important.
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  8. #28
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    http://www.mcnichols.com/products/pe.../big_round.jpg

    google images, first hit

    if its 60% open, you can use it as a grille for mids and highs, too, without concern for wave interaction.

    hell, you can get round subwoofer grilles that are made specifically out of perf aluminum!

    http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...number=260-430

    (by the way, material doesnt matter. buy perforated nickel if you care.)

    forgot to mention, to install it, I just chucked up a rabbet bit in my router (if you have a rotozip with a 1/4 inch collet adapter, thatll work too) and took some material out so the grill metal would sit flush, then used silicone to hold it. anything thats flexible, like rubber cement. I didnt want vibrations to rattle it loose then listen to a noisy grille.

    even a dremel would work with a "router" attachment and the right bit. its just milling enough material at the proper depth to get the metal mesh to sit "reasonably" flat. doesnt even have to be close to perfect. the carpet helps hide any imperfections.

  9. #29
    My man uses Levitra. Peoples's Avatar
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    I nominate this for a sticky, or FAQ emporium
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  10. #30
    Newbie islandsound's Avatar
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    I don't know if you did it already,but i have a 95 accord.You should just rise the floor like the other guy said.Am planning on Fabricating my trunk as well,but am going to be using fiberglass speaker enclosure for my subs
    (two 12"and four 10")three amps and a car pc

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