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Thread: How do I...

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by farna View Post
    ...All the instruments in a vehicle use the same 5V regulated power source...
    There is no such thing as a 5V regulated power source in my vehicle.

    On early models (prior to 1978)...
    MUCH prior--my vehicle is a 1934 Ford pickup.

    Since you indicated the car uses a 30-240 range for the fuel sending unit, it probably uses a similar range oil pressure sending unit (1978 and later, though a few vehicles, such as Jeep, continued using the older style)...
    My sending units are all universal streetrod parts--no "brand" here. Oil pressure and water temp are both 240-33 ohms (low-high) and the fuel level is 0-90 ohms (empty-full).
    Thanks,

    Dan

  2. #42
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    Dan what engine is in your truck? I guess that would not make a differance but just curious. I am using an LM34 for the temps in my pickup. And an MPX5700DP right now for oil pressure. The 5700 is a differential pressure sensor but I am going to change to an absolute sensor soon. I had the 5700 so used it. Anyway I power them off of the FB and just read the voltage. Take the voltage off the LM34 times 100 and you have the temp. And the 5700 puts out 4.5 volts at 100psi. I am using the 2907 for the speed and tach but they are not connected yet. My gas tanks are a little easier to read. They are 0 to 90 ohms. They are the only ones that I use a voltage divider for but I still use the 5 volts off of the brain. Just thought I would let you know a different way of doing things.

  3. #43
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    It has a small block Chevy in it, but there's nothing modern about it--crank-actuated mechanical fuel pump, carburetor, no ECU, etc. All of the engine-based sending units are standard, screw-in, single-lead sending units. In a "normal" situation the gauges would use 12V to power them with the "signal" coming from the resistance on the sending unit. The actual analog gauges have stepper motors in them--nothing fancy at all.

    I just want to have a clean dash with none of the usual clutter, only a single (hidden when not in use) touchscreen.
    Thanks,

    Dan

  4. #44
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    Dan
    You are doing the same thing I am. The truck was my Dads. A 76 chevy. I put a 383 in it. And want the same thing for the dash. I am going to use either a 7 or 8 inch touch screen. All the gauges are working now. I just have to paint the interior and then I will build a new instrument cluster to house the monitor. I was going to use automotive sensors but decided to build my own.

    This is pretty much what it is going to look like. I am going to change the Speedometer and Tach but the rest will stay.


  5. #45
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    The only thing I see wrong with that is the big bowtie in the middle...

    Just kidding of course, my truck is built Ford tough with Chevy parts.

    I have a number of friends that have CNC machines and I'm having one of them machine the bezel for the IC as well as my taillights. I'm making custom LED taillights that exactly fit the external stake pockets on my truck bed.
    Thanks,

    Dan

  6. #46
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    I tried putting a Ford symbol there but it kept breaking.. When you are done with your friends you can send them over to me. The big problem with mine is the bezel is not flat. So I am going to have to lay it out flat and then after all the holes are cut bend it. And I am not sure about bending aluminum. I just changed the bowtie to turn green when the oil temp is right and red if it gets too hot. If I keep changing things I will never get done.

  7. #47
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    Don't bend it, machine it to fit.

    I'm making my stuff from 2" billet aluminum and modeling it using, are you ready for this, cabinet/furniture design software! The software creates all the g-code output for the CNC so all I have to do is create a correct model.

    I have the models machined in MDF until I get them perfect then commit them to billet. After the finished product is done I polish it to a mirror finish.

    Here are some pics of the model for one of the taillight bezels. It has a step pocket on the front to hold the lens and a single pocket on the back for the wiring ti the LEDs. The front perimeter is also rounded-over.
    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Thanks,

    Dan

  8. #48
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    Dan

    That is cool what you are doing. I cannot machine mine. I would have to get a 5 inch thick piece of aluminum to do it. I might just make it out of MDF and make it look like metal. Not sure yet.

  9. #49
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    Why would it have to be so thick? My taillight bezels (above) are only 3/4" thick and will surface mount to the stake pockets.
    Thanks,

    Dan

  10. #50
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    Because of the way the goofy dash is built. They could not just make it flat or give it a slight bend. So the cluster is like this \___/ . Not that extreme but close. I forget what the angle is. The view would be from above.

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