Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Adaptable carpc/homepc system

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Adaptable carpc/homepc system

    Hi, ive been building and installing car pc's for a little over 5years. This is the latest run of models im building installing at the moment. The intention for this model was to make it more portable and adaptive as well as more user friendly.There is an on/off switch on the front of system as well as plugs at the back for remote on/off switch(located on car dash) to plug into. This enables system to boot without relying on ignition
    It can be taken out of car/rv and used as a normal desk top in the home with a 240v laptop power adaptor.It is has an:
    ASrock micro atx m/b
    2.6ghz Intel dual core cpu(boosted to 3.4ghz)
    4gb 1333mhz ddr3 ram
    60gb ocz vertex2 ssd 2.5
    250gb seagate XT hybrid hdd 2.5
    160w psu
    Sony self loading laptop dvd player/burner
    built in digital tv/ digital radio/ am/fm radio tuner
    built in bluetooth
    win7 64bit o/s
    centrafuse 3.6
    The dimensions are:W= 260mm(aprx 10 inch) x D=190mm(7.5 inch) x H=75mm(aprx 3 inch).
    The case is made out of 3mm clear perspex and and alluminium frame then painted to customer specs. The perspex is a good insulator from external heat. This allows the unit to easily operate at temperatures exceeding minus 2 degrees celsius to 75+ degrees celsius without slowing down or crashing

  • #2
    looks really good!

    i'm not feeling all the stickers, but overall, i like it.
    My OLD 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT:
    "The Project That Never Ended, until it did"


    next project? subaru brz
    carpc undecided

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Soundman. I agree with the stickers. Unfortunately they are there to covering up 2 nasty srcatches

      Comment


      • #4
        Other than the angle extrusions on the corners to allow the box to be bumped around without damage, what does one gain from this custom case over using a regular PC desktop case other than a diffrent look?
        My 2007 Ford F350 Work Log located HERE

        Comment


        • #5
          Fair question PhilG, ive been building carpc's out of many different materials for various reasons. Some made out of ply wood and timber. Some made out of various plastics but most made from recycled old desktop cases or just use old desktop cases. The location in which i live have temperatures from -4C in winter and our summers exceeding +42C regularly and our roads are terrible at best. I found that plastics such as PERSPEX and TIMBERS with a thickness of 2mm or more (thicker the better), made it much more resilliant to constant vibrations and extreme temps. In most cases, the systems would be located in the boot which easily hits temps of more than +80c during summer days. The metal desktop cases are much thinner so they heat up quicker and end up hotter. And would then radiate heat back onto the system causing it to be slow or unstable. Metal desktop cases again due to there thickness also resonate vibrations too easily(subwoofers/speakers, exhaust/engine noise etc) and dont seem to offer any obsorption. Dont get me wrong. I like the idea of recyling old pc cases or systems and giving the old riggs a second life I hope this answers your question and i appreciate your honest feedback. Thanks

          Comment


          • #6
            I completely agree that the PC would be safer in the above case over a "tin box". I can't see it keeping the PC cooler in the summer though, if the pc is saturated with 80C temps for several hours every afternoon, those temps will permeate the system regardless of the case material. I can see the that this case would insulate it in the winter though and keep the operating heat in, which I guess would be a good thing in the -C temps. I can see that case resonation would be a real issue with the "tin boxes" as well in sub woofer systems.
            Very nice looking case with some real benefits I must add!
            My 2007 Ford F350 Work Log located HERE

            Comment


            • #7
              OK - now I am not sure I see any benefit in protecting a PC from cold... unless you are concerned about condensation once it heats up... A cold PC should be a happy PC. Am I missing something here? As long as there is air movement from fans etc... cold really should not bother a PC - especially one with a solid state drive. Am I wrong?

              Comment


              • #8
                -4c is like -40deg f. at that temp, it is almost too cold, and some things don't like to start up..
                My OLD 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT:
                "The Project That Never Ended, until it did"


                next project? subaru brz
                carpc undecided

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yeah your right in all those aspects. My real issue with the really cold temps was the rapid cooling of the pc and it internal components. I had an issue a couple year ago. Travelled to the Snowy Mts (nsw Australia) for a weekend. System worked perfectly all the way to the resort. The following day went to reboot and could not get it work. Tried everything without success. When i got home i tested the M/B. It said the chipset was gone. So i pulled M/b out to be replaced with another one when i noticed a couple things on the old M/b. 1 was the presence of moisture had pooled on areas of M/b. 2 was that the M/b had a number of fine cracks on the surface. The M/b was only a 2 weeks old. Moisture was part of the problem but what caused it to crack like it did? On another forum i was talking to someone who had the same problem before which seemed to make sense. He realised that various parts of the system like the outer metal case and the internal metal M/b mount plate and the M/b itself exspanded and contracted at different rates to one another and that in his case and mine that the metal m/b mounting plate and or M/b cooled too quickly and contracted rapidly causing too much stress and distortion on the board itself. The next year i returned to the Snows only this time i made my pc case out of 12mmthick timber particle board with the M/b mounted straight onto it with rubber washers in between. I then mounted pc in the boot on its side on a 75-80 degree angle to help with the moisture/airflow problem. It worked perfectly the whole weekend and have not had problem since. From that time on i now try to avoid metal cases where possible although its still very practical in most applications.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    -4 celcius is actually only something like 25 degrees farenheit (24.8 to be exact) which is why I was puzzled by the concern for cold. The issue of different expansion rates with a 'rapid' change in temperature I can see causing problems, but that is an easy fix with allowances for expansion and contraction. (drill larger holes, and use rubber grommets or silicone etc... to give expansion and contraction tolerances) Something to consider before you call a motherboard toast is to press down on all of the chips... they can work loose... this is one of the first things I do when troubleshooting PC's... make sure any cards/memory etc as well as eprom's etc... are well seated. Just a thought. By the sound of it, it looks like you already know most of this so it is not new.

                    The moisture... well that is a definite issue. I have had problems when I tried some non typical cooling solutions back with the early AMD athlon processors (they ran HOT as heck... especially if you OC) but that was usually on the back of the MB directly under the processor. Perhaps you can attempt using some dehumidifying crystals or similar, but my bet is that you live in a humid area... you are going to have issues with temperature change and condensation regardless... you can run your AC to help... If you use the 'crystals' you do have to change them out or 're-set' them (get rid of the moisture they have collected...)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yep. definately live in a humid area. Worst during summer with an average of almost 95- 100% humidty most days. It can be a real problem. I considered dehumidifying crystals but would be changing almost daily.Fans are another good solution but part of my aim was to make the system run economicaly as possible. My great scientific solution? News papers, laid out under the carpet in layers throughout the floor space of the boot and on top of carpet when moisture is worse I replace them periodicaly. Its primitive but it does help.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X