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Is it OK to connect 1 channel per voice coil on a DVC Sub?

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  • Is it OK to connect 1 channel per voice coil on a DVC Sub?

    Is it ok to hook up a 2 Channel amp to a Dual Voice Coil Sub Woofer? 1 Channel per voice coil?

    Each coil can take up to 4 ohms, which my amp puts out per channel. And each coil takes up to 200 Watts RMS, and my amp will only put out 100 Watts RMS per channel. Which is fine I guess, but will this cause problems hooking up 1 Channel per voice coil on a a single sub?

    Im getting a lot of mixed reactions for this......

    Thank you all for any input!

  • #2
    most amps it wouldnt matter a whole lot, but the principle of it sucks. with those 2 separate channels, you really have two different outputs- even though theyre from the same amp and likely will be virtually the same output. any differences at all though would result in dissipated heat and distortion, so ideally it is not the way to go.

    most 2ch amps can be bridged into 1 channel, and then you hook up both 4-ohm coils in (parallel!) so your amp sees a 2ohm load. you have to make sure your amp is rated for this though, or else youll overheat it.

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    • #3
      So you are saying that I should bridge my amp and connect the coil in parallel right?

      AMP Bridged : 400W x 1 @ 4-Ohms bridged RMS

      Sub: 10" subwoofer with dual 4-ohm voice coils
      power handling: 50-400 watts RMS (200 watts per coil)

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      • #4
        only bridge your amp if it can handle bridging!!

        being that you haven't provided specs yet for it, we can't confirm if your amp can be bridged
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        • #5
          My mistake. My amp can handle bridging....

          Rockford Fosgate P400-2 Amp Specs
          RMS:
          400W x 1 @ 4-Ohms bridged
          4 ohms: 100 watts x 2 chan.
          2 ohms: 200 watts x 2 chan.

          Kicker CompVR 07CVR104 Specs:
          10" subwoofer with dual 4-ohm voice coils
          power handling: 50-400 watts RMS (200 watts per coil)
          800 watts peak power handling
          frequency response: 25-500 Hz

          Any thoughts?

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          • #6
            it looks like you have the perfect parts! hook it up to the amp in bridged mode. running that amp @ 2-ohms will give you the most power output, but to be honest its probably overpowered for what you sub can handle. thats no big deal though, just be careful of how much gain you set- youll be able to get that sub to sing!

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            • #7
              Thank you soo much!

              so i guess ultimately, each coil would receive 2 ohms each and 200 watts if I bridge my amp?

              will it be a problem that each coil is not receiving 4 ohms each?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by trader007 View Post
                and then you hook up both 4-ohm coils in series so your amp sees a 2ohm load.
                Correction here. 2x4Ohm coils in series is 8Ohms. You have to hook them up in parallel to get 2Ohms.

                However, that amp is not rated for a 2Ohm load in bridged mode.

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                • #9
                  How do you suggest I set this up?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sicarius View Post
                    Correction here. 2x4Ohm coils in series is 8Ohms. You have to hook them up in parallel to get 2Ohms.

                    However, that amp is not rated for a 2Ohm load in bridged mode.
                    yeah that was fairly belligerent of me, sorry about that. im an electrician too.. eek. from everything ive known about fosgate amps though, 2ohms will probably be just fine. especially since the sub isnt that heavy...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fiznada View Post
                      How do you suggest I set this up?
                      all it means is your amp will run hotter then it would if it was hooked to a 4-ohm load. your sub isnt that demanding anyway, i cant imagine it would be a problem... not with a fosgate amp (which are always underrated, fosgates have always been that way)

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                      • #12
                        So I should bridge my sub and wire the coils in parallel?
                        Sorry, Im a beginner.

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                        • #13
                          But given it says it puts out 400W x 1 @ 4-Ohms when bridged, putting a 2 ohm load would attempt to double the output power from the amp. In this particular case it is not safe for the amp, and it not safe for the sub. I'd say get a different sub to work with that amp or vise versa.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by fiznada View Post
                            So I should bridge my sub and wire the coils in parallel?
                            Sorry, Im a beginner.
                            youre fine. im the one thats screwing this up. running it in 2ohm will roughly double the output power, but if you set your gain correctly it wont matter. people run fosgate amps below the rated ohms all the time, some even go to 1ohm but thats where it gets scary (hot!)

                            if you want to make sure youre wired up right, wire the voice coils on the sub in parallel and before you hook it to the amp, test the leads with a multimeter set to ohms. it should be right around 2ohm... its good to do this anyway to make sure your sub is OK.

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                            • #15
                              dang....sO i cant bridge my amp cus its not 2 ohm stable (bridging at 4Ohms stable) which will cause overheating if I am looking at this right.

                              I can't afford a new amp and I ordered this speaker online. I feel like Im going to need to just hook up each channel to coil and go the safe route hoping that both channels are letting out amps equally.

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