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0/1 to 4 gauge to 8 gauge...... to 16 Gauge

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  • 0/1 to 4 gauge to 8 gauge...... to 16 Gauge

    I also posted this on DIYMA, spent hours searching, including this forum. Looked at terminal and fuse blocks but cant find a link to what surely exsists.

    A single connector/input 4 or 8 gauge to a fused block with spade or whatever connectors out to 16 gauge. We have so much stuff running 16. I have an Opus that needs 3 connections, Fusion Brain, Switches, Relays etc. I need to find this thing but having trouble.

    I am running 0/1 gauge from battery to 2 distro blocks, one neg one positive in a large glove box behind passenger seat, then I can configure 4 or 8 gauge out.

    Can anyone point me to a place that sells and ship to Canada? Or a general product I can look at? Or how you handled it?
    Last edited by -zip-; 04-06-2011, 11:12 AM.
    2008 350z GT Installed since April 22nd 2011 - Worklog
    2000 Protege Installed Since April 2, 2005 - Intel D201GLY|Fusion Brain|ODBPros ODBII|Engenius|GPS Rikaline|Powermate|Motorized Lilli
    Sound Stage
    Eclipse|MTX|Infinity

  • #2
    I use these:
    http://www.amazon.com/Fuse-Block-Ato.../dp/B001P6FTHC
    http://www.amazon.com/BLUE-SEA-SYSTE.../dp/B000K2MBPA

    For distribution once you get to the smaller sizes. Run an 8 gauge wire with a ring terminal to the power, and branch off from there.
    http://www.sonicelectronix.com/item_...k-NFB3438.html
    Something like that, for example, would be adequate to split off the 4 gauge to a few 8 gauge outputs, fused even.
    "stop with the REINSTALLS, what do you think we got some lame-o installer!!!" - mitchjs
    RevFE
    My Shop

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    • #3
      I'd avoid the older glass fuses and use blades instead. Better contact integrity and (construction) reliability.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks Malcom and Mayor Spark, I got the distro blocks, and those Amazon things look perfect except they dont ship to Canada

        Old Spark, What about these? http://www.wiringproducts.com/contents/en-us/d136.html

        I cant tell if they will accept 4 or 8 gauge in? Shipping cost is crazy but im willing to pay it to ship to Canada if there is no other option. Its the last little piece I need for the install which is happening in 2 weeks so I have to order something soon.
        Last edited by -zip-; 04-06-2011, 03:33 PM.
        2008 350z GT Installed since April 22nd 2011 - Worklog
        2000 Protege Installed Since April 2, 2005 - Intel D201GLY|Fusion Brain|ODBPros ODBII|Engenius|GPS Rikaline|Powermate|Motorized Lilli
        Sound Stage
        Eclipse|MTX|Infinity

        Comment


        • #5
          i usually just fold the smaller gauge wire over a couple of times until the terminal can make a good grip on it..
          My OLD 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT:
          "The Project That Never Ended, until it did"


          next project? subaru brz
          carpc undecided

          Comment


          • #6
            Soundman do you also use a fuse? I have read if you change the wire size its best to fuse it. Your option is a good option too and wont cost me anything, but is it safe? I need several connections for Opus power supply, Fusion Brain, Relays, switches, etc. Can I connect multipule devices to one output on a distro block ?

            The distro blocks I have are fused, have 3 outputs. One will go to amp at 4 ga. then I have all these little devices all with 16 ga wiring so I have 2 outs left that can either be 4 or 8 ga.


            side note:

            I called the owner.
            I found something that ships to canada but its damn expensive. For you USA folks price is ok, its the shipping that kills us brothers north

            http://www.wiringproducts.com/conten...136.html#p4002
            Last edited by -zip-; 04-06-2011, 02:31 PM.
            2008 350z GT Installed since April 22nd 2011 - Worklog
            2000 Protege Installed Since April 2, 2005 - Intel D201GLY|Fusion Brain|ODBPros ODBII|Engenius|GPS Rikaline|Powermate|Motorized Lilli
            Sound Stage
            Eclipse|MTX|Infinity

            Comment


            • #7
              if the device has it's own fuse, then just add up all the devices, and install a fuse of that size on that 'port' on the distro block. if the devices don't have a fuse, there are plenty of fuse harnesses available that you can fuse each individual device

              remember, if something were to go wrong with the device, it probably won't blow the fuse right away-- the fuse is there to prevent the wire from shorting should it get cut/knicked--like in a car accident... the main power wire fuse really should not be used to protect all teh devices so much..
              My OLD 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT:
              "The Project That Never Ended, until it did"


              next project? subaru brz
              carpc undecided

              Comment


              • #8
                I am currently facing the same problem, I have run 4 gauge into my canopy as it is a 10 metre loop and want a fuse block to power all the devices in it like my fridge and lights.
                I saw this on another forum and thought it looked reasonably neat.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The awkward thing with that (soldering) method is heat-treating the contacts - it can weaken the springiness etc.

                  [ FYI - That's a fault with glass connectors after years or decades - contact spring tension decreases after heating. Combined with bad contact (oxidisation over a large area), the causes thermal runaway - more heat, less tension, worse contact - then FIRE!. Ever burnt your fingers on a glass fuse or its holder eve though it's passing stuff-all power? Hence go for ATO/ATC blade fuses - or screw-bolt in for higher currents (~40A upwards).
                  But that is after time. My MAIN reason against glass is end-cap joins fuse joins end-cap. Two joins prone to failure through vibration or CHeap or bad construction. (Strange, I can seem to combine poor quality with a lower-case CHeap.) I have seen many NEW open-circuit glass fuses of late. I suspect they are made in INA.
                  Blade fuses however can be one pressing, else more robust joints.
                  They can still have fractures (that open ONLY when in use - ie, heated) and have contact corrosion, but since the OldFart Fault-Finding Dictum is to rotate all same sized fuses (else remove/refit to at least break-make contact), that can usually be traced. Inserting blades should be met with some resistance - ie, contact friction/pressure - else beware poor contact.... fire. ]


                  -zip- - those ATO/ATC etc fuse holders look good. At least wrt the fuse being a blade type. (I tend to use fuse blocks from other cars, but that's because my fusing is engine bay or external so those blocks (with side-spades) don't suit. And I since I frequent wreckers....)


                  And reiterating soundman and others - fusing is to protect what is downstream (until the next protection/fuse).
                  The equipment should have its own protection fuse (IMO the user should never have to worry about that).
                  Hence your fusing is to protect the distribution to the equipment.
                  Hence you might have a big fuse at/near the battery to protect the first big cable segment, then smaller fuses downstream to protect their smaller cable segments, repeated...
                  Every smaller branch in the tree will have its fuse protecting it.
                  However the last can be restated as every smaller branch in the tree will have a fuse protecting it. That could mean any of its upstream fuses protect it.
                  Hence you get systems where you might have big to medium to small cables from the source (battery), but there is only ONE fuse at the battery. EG - cables of 100A, 50A, 30A feeding a max 10A load with a 10A to 30A (max) fuse at the battery.
                  That may sound stupid, but it is used when voltage drops are to be minimised, when future expansion is expected, or maybe even for increased reliability. The same can be done in any branch.
                  The only real fusing rule is that <whatever> shall have something somewhere upstream that protects it (and that that something should not itself be a hazard!! I've seen too many systems that were safer WITHOUT their fuse!)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sounds good, Ill use some ATO inline fuse holders if needed with devices that have no protection internally, I already have a couple of these holders, and hook them the way you guys suggest. I will also add up the total Amps of all the weenie devices and slap that fuse on the distro block. I have the KnuKoncept distro blocks so I will have to figure out how to fold the wire over, but this is the cheapest method so will go with it this year and see how it works out. Thanks guys!
                    Last edited by -zip-; 04-06-2011, 10:27 PM.
                    2008 350z GT Installed since April 22nd 2011 - Worklog
                    2000 Protege Installed Since April 2, 2005 - Intel D201GLY|Fusion Brain|ODBPros ODBII|Engenius|GPS Rikaline|Powermate|Motorized Lilli
                    Sound Stage
                    Eclipse|MTX|Infinity

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Have you tried Princess Auto? I got my MAXI fuse blocks from the surplus area there. I believe they also have ATC fuse blocks which would be good for the smaller gauge wiring - something like this one.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I got recently got dual MAXI holders from some French car (Pug maybe?) complete with one 40A MAXI fuse.
                        (Though for 40A - why bother? I'd be tempted to use the plastic flinks (fuselinks) for up to about 100A (their max rating?) since there are lots of modular boxes for them (from cars). But for ~40A & higher, I'd be tempted to use the bolt in types - but that is based on one hot discolored 40A plug-in flink in my engine bay - ie, bad contacts -> heat -> melts but doesn't blow. Different for clean stuff not in e-bays.)

                        That's more FYI FWIW....

                        BTW - I tend to use circuit breakers; ~AUD$7 each for blade types (to 30A) for lights & other "critical" accessories , and up to 50A stud & bolt (weather/water-proof) for (eg) my inter-battery connection (to supply a load of 2.5A max but cable capable of 100A or more). They are self-resetting so headlights come back on, and flat aux batteries that have taken a charge above 50A eventually return to normal service (rather than finding at the end of the trip my fridge is not cold, and seeing the tree before the headlights drop out again).

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                        • #13
                          Depends on what you're protecting - they can take a lifetime to trip. Many moons ago in my competition days I ran a first generation Orion 425HCCA high current amp that was fed by 2X30A fuses. One set of channels was running at the load limit and a good bass beat would take out a 30A fuse. Got tired of pulling over and changing the fuse in the trunk, so I replaced it with a 25A CB. 2 days later I was looking at a $350 bill for a new power supply stage - not only did the 4 month old amp smoke, they wouldn't warranty the repair due to the breaker.

                          Not saying they're no good, you just have to be sure that the components you are protecting can wait until the breaker trips. I'll take fuses any day after that.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            That's a function of the fuse/breaker type.
                            You chose wrong. Breakers can be faster than fuses - but not only does that vary with load, it als depends on the fuse/breaker type and their trip curves.


                            But is the 2x30A fuses were in parallel, and you only took out one (not both) fuses, then something is/was wrong (maybe only one was connected?).
                            And they probably would not have blown at only 110% overload anyhow.

                            But this is for distribution, NOT for equipment protection.
                            Any manufacturer that makes the user supply the protection fuse without specifying exactly what size & type of fuse is probably looking for a way out of their warranty (though some legit excuses exist).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by malcom2073 View Post
                              I'm also looking at the same problem (16g wire to 4g). I saw the Blue Sea fuse panel and think that is probably the best/safest option for the OP.

                              I did a bit of searching and it looks like lots of truck/SUV guys use these for all their off-road lighting, etc..

                              ---------- Post added at 10:20 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:18 PM ----------

                              Originally posted by soundman98 View Post
                              i usually just fold the smaller gauge wire over a couple of times until the terminal can make a good grip on it..
                              I don't like the sound of that.

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