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2 ohm speakers available?

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  • 2 ohm speakers available?

    Hey are there any good 2 ohm front a rear speakers on the market. I see a mostly 4 ohm speakers although amps adverstise their amps at the 4 and 2 ohms ratings. Why would they do that if there arent any 2 ohm speakers
    -Jesus- King of Kings Lord of Lords

  • #2
    Subs can be purchased in dual-voice coil models which often have two 4 ohm voice coils. This allows the sub to run at 8 ohms if the coils are place in series, or 2 ohm if placed in parallel.

    Any two four ohm speakers are equivilent to a single 2 ohm speaker if placed in parallel. That is why amp manufacturers advertise that way.
    2006 Chevy Colorado: VIA M10000 EDEN, 1 GB RAM, 80 GB 2.5" Seagate HDD, USB Slim Slot DVD/RW, Holux GPS, MobileVU 10.4" LCD (touch not working yet), VOOMPC Case (blue), 70W DC-DC supply.

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    • #3
      Yes they make 2 ohm component speakers. You might have to dig a little more to find them though.

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      • #4
        Becareful with 2 ohms. Make sure your amp is stable at a 2 ohm load before you get them.
        Trust me, I know what I'm doing!

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        • #5
          Does anyone have any links?

          Isn't less resistance better?

          each speaker will have its own channel so none will be run in parralell. I am just trying to get the most out of my amp. It boasts 100w rms per channel @ 2 ohms and 65w rms per channel @ 4 ohms so it leads me to believe that I should get 2 ohm speakers right?
          -Jesus- King of Kings Lord of Lords

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          • #6
            Soundstream SPL series

            Go perfect with the amp, eh?

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            • #7
              It sure would. Thanks for the tip. I will check them out
              -Jesus- King of Kings Lord of Lords

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              • #8
                Hmmm. Is there any caveots of getting 2 ohm speakers. Are the just as clear and crisp as other 4 ohm speakers?
                -Jesus- King of Kings Lord of Lords

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                • #9
                  There are differences between speakers with different impedences, as to how they play and how they sound. I have to go move a desk, so I don't have time to explain it all (and probably, I'm not qualified to do it justice either). This might be a good starting point for some research: http://www.hometoys.com/htinews/feb0.../impedence.htm

                  Hope this helps

                  C!

                  (Oh - I dig the Soundstream. My old Reference 404 is still going strong, and it's 1/2 Ohm stable. That's a lot o speakers!)
                  http://carpc.riposte.net
                  I reserve all rights in connection to each post I author, without exception.

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                  • #10
                    That is some good info. Thanks

                    I went into a car audio store the other day and i told the salesman (looked like the owner) my setup and how i wanted 2 ohm speakers and he tried to steer me away from them. I kinda go the feeling that he was doing that becasue he didn't have any 2ohm speakers.

                    I am still not sold on the 2 ohms but would like to hear them in person. I would love all of the extra power
                    -Jesus- King of Kings Lord of Lords

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by antimatter
                      That is some good info. Thanks

                      I am still not sold on the 2 ohms but would like to hear them in person. I would love all of the extra power
                      Typically, you won't find 2 ohm speakers - you'll take a pair of 4 ohm speakers and run them in parallel so they 'present' a 2 ohm load to the amp.

                      So it follows - using 8 ohm speakers, you'll need 4 of them to present a 2 ohm load.

                      If you only have the space for a single driver, and are all fired up about 2ohm woofers, then look for a dual voice coil driver - get the idea?

                      Here's your next stop on the research trail: http://www.the12volt.com/caraudio/boxcalcs.asp.

                      This should be required reading for anyone wanting to DIY a car audio installation. So should this site: http://www.bcae1.com/

                      Now - neither of these really answer your original question, which I heard as "What is the sound quality difference between 2 and 4 ohm?".

                      I don't proclaim to know the answer, but here's my suspicion/guess/opinion (if you research and find different - tell us!):

                      Lower resistance loads are not as accurate and precise as higher resistance loads. This isn't as critical for subs, as they are generally sloppy and inefficient, which is why people typically run significantly larger amps to run them. After all, subs deal with a frequency range between say 20hz and 90hz (depending on your crossover set up), while your front stage deals with say 90hz to 20,000hz.

                      Accuracy is much more important in the precise bits that we listen to that usually happens in the mid range and top end. As a result, car audio tends to (but not always) get set up as:

                      * Subs - bridging channels or wired in parallel to see a lower impedance
                      * Fronts - driven at say 4 ohm.

                      This is how my system is currently set up (although it was significantly more complex when I was competing in car audio competitions).

                      I suspect that if you haven't had subs before, you'll probably struggle to tell the difference. You'll be too busy grinning and drooling at all that bass!

                      Here's the most important thing: You listen to your stereo with your ears - not your eyes, and not a multimeter (and not your cheque-book, but that's another story). Plug them in and listen. If you like it, leave it. Research why you should change it rather than just experimenting. Make sure you know the risks of your experiment if you don't understand. Amps and speakers stop working when the smoke gets out, and it's really hard to put the smoke back in a cooked woofer to make it work again


                      There is a lot on the bcae site about why attempting to run everything at 2 om is futile (and sometimes expensive).

                      Read the pages on ohms law, and on bridging amplifiers as a starting point.

                      C!
                      http://carpc.riposte.net
                      I reserve all rights in connection to each post I author, without exception.

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                      • #12
                        If you only have the space for a single driver, and are all fired up about 2ohm woofers, then look for a dual voice coil driver - get the idea?
                        He is asking about front and rear speaks, not subs (at least by rear I don't think he means subs).

                        Isn't less resistance better?
                        If we are talking about the interconnects between things then yes but not necessarily when dealing with amplifiers.

                        each speaker will have its own channel so none will be run in parralell. I am just trying to get the most out of my amp. It boasts 100w rms per channel @ 2 ohms and 65w rms per channel @ 4 ohms so it leads me to believe that I should get 2 ohm speakers right?
                        Understand something about speakers in that if the amp is rated at some given wattage you aren't delivering that all the time. I think this is largely misunderstood by most people that don't know car audio.

                        Each doubling of power results in a a 3db increase in volume with an approximately 10db increase representing double the loudness. So if your speakers produced 90db of sound with 1 watt (commonly referred to as the sensitivy rating) then at 2 watts they produce 93db of sound. This doesn't account for any gain your car will produce because of the enclosed space.

                        As we continue this thought experiement keep these values in mind:

                        A walkman at full volume will produce approx 100db into your ears.
                        The front rows of a rock concert approx. 110db
                        The pain threshold begins at 130db

                        Continuing at 4W your speaks produce 96db, 8W=99db, 16W = 102db (you are now blasting a walkman in your ears) 32W = 105db and at 64W = 108db you are close to simulating the front row of a rock concert right there in your car. Now, if you wanted 2 ohm speaks and could double to 128W then you would be at 111db (not much more than 108db huh?). Since you are only getting up to 110W then you are coming in near 110db, which isn't much better than 108. This is all assuming you are driving your setup and full volume all the time, which you will be foolish to do so.

                        So my point is you don't gain much volume wise (and even then it is only a small fraction of your listening time), but what is the tradeoff? A huge loss in sound quality. Through the entire power range a 2 ohm speaker sounds much worse than a 4ohm speaker if you don't have a great amplifier. Distortion goes up a ton the lower in impedance you go. Again, you don't hear it as much in a sub because of the frequency range but with your high end components this shows up big time as harshness and grittyness.

                        You might ask why car audio setups tend towards 4 and 2 ohm components when home speakers tend toward 6s all the way up to 16 and more? To get lots of power into an 8 ohm speaker requires a larger voltage which starts to cost more money because of the switching supply in the amp has to produce these voltages which means more costly transformers, capacitors, etc etc.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MrPerfectionest
                          He is asking about front and rear speaks, not subs (at least by rear I don't think he means subs).
                          Agreed - but the same principle holds. Having re-read the original question though, and thinking about it, I don't think that I have ever seen a 2 Ohm speaker. Ever. Any one else? (Exclude DVC's for the moment)

                          C!
                          (Please excuse the snip of the well written essay which actually answered the question)
                          http://carpc.riposte.net
                          I reserve all rights in connection to each post I author, without exception.

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                          • #14
                            With the 5.1 setup he has I don't think he'll want to run his speakers in parrallel. If he wants two ohms he'll have to find speakers that are so equipped. I have never heard of 2 ohms speakers although someone mentioned it in the thread. I have heard of dual voice call woofers that can be wired to 2 ohms or like explained earlier running the cabin speakers in parallel can yield 2 ohms.
                            Georgia Area Meet Photos

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                            • #15
                              You guys should trust google more often




                              Typically you only find 2 ohm components in the higher end speakers because those that are very serious about competition are the ones that are trying to really drive lots of power through them.

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