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My new speakers sound like crap!!

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  • My new speakers sound like crap!!

    So here's the deal, I have no idea what i'm doing when it comes to car audio. I have a chevy cavalier, I put in a Sony headunit a couple of years ago that says 45x4 (watts i think). I just had the stock speakers and everything was fine. Today I got brand new JVC 6x9's to put in the back (JVC-V6934). It says they're 3-way and 280 watts max. well i spent all day putting them in and they sound like CRAP. so much worse than the stock speakers. It almost sounds like they're blown. Even at super low volumes it just sounds like poor quality. The polarity's not backwards or anything either. I wish i could explain what it sounds like better, it's kinda crackly almost, like it's blown. is it clipping? or is there any way i can figure out what the problem is? or do you already know and you think i'm an idiot? lol, thanks for the help ahead of time.

    Ryan

  • #2
    also i had the bass up when i first tried them out... it sounded like something was being pushed way too hard, i didn't already ruin the speakers did i!?! I have new HU that i'm going to install soon (KD-AR560) will that help at all? sorry i'm so nieve, but ya gotta start somewhere

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    • #3
      How is your carpc hooked up to the headunit?

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      • #4
        hmmm, i have no idea, i had my head unit installed by a professional a couple of years ago

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        • #5
          Maybe they're less efficient than the stock speakers and you are clipping the amp in the headunit. Try a separate power amp.

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          • #6
            What vehicle and how are they installed? Are the openings in the rear for a 6x9 speaker or are they just sitting back there?
            Take my advice: Do not try to build a system that includes EVERY feature. Start with the basics, build it to a bug free state, and THEN add on.

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            • #7
              a couple possibilities come to my mind.

              first, it's impossible to blow your speakers with that headunit. i'm thinking it's the opposite. if you have 280W, then even the RMS will be much higher than your stock speakers. it is possible your headunit amp just is underpowering it. I got some 300W speakers (100RMS) and my headunit, which was 45W (22RMS) was not giving it enough oomph to really show off it's capabilities. It was all solved when i hooked it up to my kicker amp. If you are not hooking it up to a power amplifier, then u may consider a lower speaker.

              second, check the connections on your speakers. if you are working with raw wires instead of connectors, then it's really picky -- you might have to solder them in to get better connections.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dtran01
                a couple possibilities come to my mind.

                first, it's impossible to blow your speakers with that headunit.
                Very very very very wrong. I could blow up a 1000 watt speaker with 100 watt amp easy peasy

                A stock head unit could destroy his speakers
                Take my advice: Do not try to build a system that includes EVERY feature. Start with the basics, build it to a bug free state, and THEN add on.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Will Albers
                  Very very very very wrong. I could blow up a 1000 watt speaker with 100 watt amp easy peasy

                  A stock head unit could destroy his speakers

                  umm...no

                  there is 3 ways to "blow" a driver...

                  1. exceeding the thermal power handling capabilites
                  2. exceeding the mechanical capabilities (x-mech)
                  3. factory error or malfunction

                  If a coil of wire can handle 25 watts RMS, the signal can be clean or distorted and it will handle it. The only scenario where a distorted signal may cause a sub to be more prone to damage is when the distorted signal causes the sub's movement to be irregular. This may result in decreased air flow through the vents which hinders the dissipation of heat. Heat kills speakers, not distortion.
                  www.innovativerides.com
                  Check out the white toyota tacoma in the gallery :)

                  References:
                  www.ebay.com (NisAznMonk)

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                  • #10
                    Ryan,

                    Try using an aftermarket amp. Like BassBinDevil said, an aftermarket amplifier may help. A HU will never pump out more than 15watts RMS per channel. The listed 45x4 will only happen if it got struck by lightening.
                    www.innovativerides.com
                    Check out the white toyota tacoma in the gallery :)

                    References:
                    www.ebay.com (NisAznMonk)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by NisAznMonk
                      The only scenario where a distorted signal may cause a sub to be more prone to damage is when the distorted signal causes the sub's movement to be irregular. This may result in decreased air flow through the vents which hinders the dissipation of heat. Heat kills speakers, not distortion.
                      Exactly

                      Or DC spikes from overdriving the amplifier
                      Take my advice: Do not try to build a system that includes EVERY feature. Start with the basics, build it to a bug free state, and THEN add on.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Will Albers
                        Very very very very wrong. I could blow up a 1000 watt speaker with 100 watt amp easy peasy

                        A stock head unit could destroy his speakers
                        Originally posted by Will Albers
                        Exactly

                        Or DC spikes from overdriving the amplifier
                        if you fully clip an amp it puts out a DC signal, not AC, and its output doubles, so youd get 200w of DC. So no agian...
                        www.innovativerides.com
                        Check out the white toyota tacoma in the gallery :)

                        References:
                        www.ebay.com (NisAznMonk)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by NisAznMonk
                          if you fully clip an amp it puts out a DC signal, not AC, and its output doubles, so youd get 200w of DC. So no agian...
                          You're misinformed.

                          The biggest single cause of loudspeaker driver failure is the high frequencies generated by an amplifier when it is driven into clipping. When the output signal of an amplifier is clipped (i.e. the output voltage, if unrestricted, would exceed the power supply voltage of the amplifier) the result is a signal that increasingly resembles a squarewave. A square wave, unlike a sinewave of a similar frequency, contains high frequency harmonics at a much higher level than would normally present in most audio signals. Hence the HF drivers in a loudspeaker, which are only designed to accept normal audio signals, have their coils burned-out by these high frequency harmonics generated by amplifier clipping. Therefore, whenever possible install an amplifier that matches or exceeds the power-handling of your loudspeaker

                          DC voltage... When a transistor, mosfet or bipolar amplifier (it doesn’t matter what type) processes a signal peak that is greater than its ability to completely amplify it, the level of the signal is ultimately limited to the internal DC power rails. In other words if the DC power rails on the amplifier are +/-35V then signal output voltage cannot exceed that (a bit less really).
                          When a sine wave signal (for clarity) reaches the limits of the power supply rails, the tops of the sine wavers are "flattened" because the voltage limit of the power supply rail has been reached. The signal still goes through to the speakers with the flattened tops. blah blah blah "clipping".

                          This presents a serious threat to the life of the speaker!

                          The flattened ‘bit’ at the top and bottom of the signal is in fact raw DC across the speaker voice coil, positive one instant, negative the next. The DC causes the voice coil to heat up rapidly, cooking the insulating enamel on the wire and burning away the adhesive holding the assembly in place. How long the voice coil will survive under these conditions depends on many factors; the repetition rate and time duration of the DC component of the signal is the most important, but voice coil construction magnet size and ambient temperature also have a bearing.

                          PA, HI FI and car speakers are all at risk. It does not matter whether it is an expensive European, American or lower cost Asian product, they are all vulnerable.

                          You can generally hear that an amplifier is clipping quite easily. The sound from the speaker becomes very harsh. The first thought is that the speaker is overloaded, after all, the sound is emanating from them. On the other hand, when a big amplifier is in use with a small speaker, genuine overload sounds far less harsh, and is not nearly as dangerous to the speaker. In 9 times out of 10, my experience has shown that what sounds like speaker overload is in fact amplifier clipping. Unlikely as it sounds, it is easier to destroy a 200W speaker with a 35W amplifier, than a 100W speaker with a 200W amplifier!

                          I could go on... Spending my early 20's as the manager of an electronic repair shop had its perks
                          Take my advice: Do not try to build a system that includes EVERY feature. Start with the basics, build it to a bug free state, and THEN add on.

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                          • #14
                            most voice coils can handle much much more than there rated for with a clean unclipped signal..... distortion kills speakers, by using a bigger amp & some common sense as far as not bottoming or severely overdriving can be safer than a smaller amp that is constanly being pushed into distortion to reach a pleasing spl level....
                            MY NEWEST INSTALL:modded infiniti fx with big screen

                            first windows carpc install........my liquid cooled LVDS screen :D

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                            • #15
                              Your underpowering your speakers... thats 45wX4 peak.. not rms on your headunit, and your speakers are 280w or whatever peak, not rms... you should match the speakers and amp as close as you can... you can blow speakers by underpowering them, its no bueno...
                              1997 30th Anniversary Z28 Camaro M6 w/ T-Tops
                              www.cardomain.com/id/squigley - i should prob update this...
                              "Gettin Sideways"
                              ~Ryan Quigley

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