Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Eliminating Ground Loop

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Eliminating Ground Loop

    Now before you all shout at me for asking an FAQ and not searching, just hear me out - I have been reading up on this topic.

    I upgraded my RCA cable yesterday from my headunit - amp and it made such a different that I do not have to use a ground loop isolator anymore. I can still hear a slight whine in the music though so it's not 100% perfect.

    Just an idea I had if i took the ground line off of the headunit and grounded it to the same point as the amp and pc in the boot, I should be completely eliminating the ground loop shouldn't I as they're all grounded at the same point?

  • #2
    What kind of car do you have?

    The long ground line may or may not cause more problems by picking up more inducted noise.

    Comment


    • #3
      You might want to try running a wire between the radio grounding point and the amp grounding point. That way your grounds stay short but the grounding points are connected. I would use at least 8 gauge wire.

      Comment


      • #4
        It's a Daewoo Lanos, I just thought by grounding everything to the same place it would eliminate the loop.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Shadow
          What kind of car do you have?

          The long ground line may or may not cause more problems by picking up more inducted noise.
          Ground lines do not pick up inducted noise or we would have one hell of a problem.

          Entire car chassis = VERY long/wide ground line
          Take my advice: Do not try to build a system that includes EVERY feature. Start with the basics, build it to a bug free state, and THEN add on.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by norbie
            It's a Daewoo Lanos, I just thought by grounding everything to the same place it would eliminate the loop.
            Unless a component finds it easier just to ground through the interconnect. You are correct though, in theory that should take care of a ground loop. Just keep in mind that the longer a wire, the higher its resistance. When a component is grounding, it will take the path of least resistance. Also its not always the interconnect OR ground wire. Sometimes it can be a little of both until it finds an equilibrium.
            Take my advice: Do not try to build a system that includes EVERY feature. Start with the basics, build it to a bug free state, and THEN add on.

            Comment


            • #7
              Would you do it yourself? (grounding headunit to the same place as amp in the boot)

              I'm still getting a little intereference, I'm upgrading the audio cable soon and will try with and without ground loop.

              When you talk about high resistance do you mean I would need quite a thick cable as it goes over distance?

              Thanks for everyone's help

              Comment


              • #8
                Is it grounded to the car's wiring harness or is it grounded to part of the dash behind the radio?

                Comment


                • #9
                  It's the wiring harness as far as I can see, I haven't followed the cable to see where exactly it's grounded too though.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Did you install your radio? It may need to be grounded to your floorpan or firewall or something.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yes I installed it, I just put it on the same stock ground in the wiring harness that the old stereo was on.

                      I'll have a look for wiring diagrams.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you connected it to another wire, disconnect it and ground it DIRECTLY to the chassis.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ok I'll try that.

                          On another note my audio in general can get terribly distorted.

                          I have a 4 x 45w headunit, with Pioneer 110w 4" front speakers on the headunit, and 2 330w 6x9 speakers running off a 2x200w amplifier in the back.

                          The volume control on the headunit goes upto 47, if I have it around 30 or above everything is terribly distorted and I don't know why, all the connections are good, cables are good, the speaker are rated above the output of the headunit so should be able to cope.

                          Any ideas on that one, oh great one?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            That's because you're clipping the amplifier in the radio. If you keep it up you'll blow your speakers with less than half of their rated wattage.

                            If you want louder, get an amp.

                            Also check your gains. They're probably not set correctly.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by norbie
                              Ok I'll try that.

                              On another note my audio in general can get terribly distorted.

                              I have a 4 x 45w headunit, with Pioneer 110w 4" front speakers on the headunit, and 2 330w 6x9 speakers running off a 2x200w in the back.

                              The volume control on the headunit goes upto 47, if I have it around 30 or above everything is terribly distorted and I don't know why, all the connections are good, cables are good, the speaker are rated above the output of the headunit so should be able to cope.

                              Any ideas on that one, oh great one?

                              So so wrong on many levels but its not your fault. Its a common misconception that a speaker with a higher rating can handle anything a lesser powered amp can send at it. This is incorrect. What you are experiencing is distortion. Distortion will kill a speaker whether its 10 watts or 1000. In fact I could blow up a 100 watt speaker with that head unit easily.

                              All head units have distortion right about at the level you are experiencing. If you have the loud button and eq anywhere but flat, that distortion will kick in much sooner.

                              Do a search on this forum for distortion. You may want to read posts that talk about overpowering a speaker vs underpowering. Lots of good knowledge to pick up.
                              Take my advice: Do not try to build a system that includes EVERY feature. Start with the basics, build it to a bug free state, and THEN add on.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X