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Fiat Palio Multijet OBD Port Location?

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  • Fiat Palio Multijet OBD Port Location?

    I have a Fiat Palio 1.4 Multijet 2008 model.

    It would be of great help if someone can point me to the location of the OBD port on this car.

    Any idea about the protocol used by FIAT?

  • #2
    Dont know the exact location'of the connector. But it must be within 1 meter of the steering wheel. I do know the protocol for EOBD. That's obligatory Can in 2008.
    So changes are high that the factory protocol will also be some form of Can.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks...I finally found the OBD connector hidden next to the glovebox...

      But later I learnt through Fiat Forums that the protocol used is not standards compliant and no OBD SW that I'm aware of will connect :-(

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi,
        I have Stilo JTD and is not OBD compatible too. But Im hear that some Stilo'2 are OBD compatible and OBD softwares work ok... You can try connect it and you will see if you receive right data.
        Im receive on my car on idle 220rpm (must around 900rpm) speed when Im stop 0kmh when moving 255kmh...

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        • #5
          DigitalVampire, what country do you live in?
          In other words, do the EOBD-laws apply to your car?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by p2psmurf View Post
            DigitalVampire, what country do you live in?
            In other words, do the EOBD-laws apply to your car?
            I'm from India. I could be wrong, but as a far as I understand, there are no laws here requiring the compliance to OBD specs.

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            • #7
              You will need a professional after-market scanner or a factory scanner for this car.
              Wait just a little, because most after-market scanners do not support 2008 models yet.

              I'm assuming you have a right-hand drive vehicle, then it makes sense that the diagnostic connector is behind the glove box. Originally this car was designed for Left hand drive and the connector was close to the steering wheel. Then they moved the steering wheel to the right and left the diagnostic connector where it was.
              A common mistake in Europe, even when the car is used in Europe and by Law the connector MUST be close to the steering wheel. Seen this with Citroen, Peugeot and Fiat.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DigitalVampire View Post
                I have a Fiat Palio 1.4 Multijet 2008 model.

                It would be of great help if someone can point me to the location of the OBD port on this car.

                Any idea about the protocol used by FIAT?
                Don't assume that it might not be OBD II compliant, list the pins that are populated on the OBD II port in most cases the manufacturers use a global design and that would mean they would not bother taking away OBD II for a specific market.

                If you list out all the pins that are populated we can make an educated guess on wether the car might be OBD II compliant or not

                Thanks
                Paul
                www.obdpros.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Michbound, the mere presence of an EOBD compliant connector doesn't mean it's compliant. Now I use EOBD, because this car will never be OBD2 compliant as it's not sold in the USA. There are lot's of diesels in Europe with a 16-pin compliant connector, complete with pin 7 or 6 and 14. But they do not communicate with any known EOBD/OBD2 scanner, just because they don't have to.

                  But if DigitalVampire wants to be sure, there's a simple method to find out if his car is compliant. Just hook up a decent scanner and see if it's communicating.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by p2psmurf View Post
                    Michbound, the mere presence of an EOBD compliant connector doesn't mean it's compliant.
                    Right I did not say that the connector means it's compliant, all I was suggesting was that the OP list out the pins and maybe it will shed some light on wether it is OBD or EOBD compliant...

                    But you are correct the ultimate test would be plug in an OBD scanner although the OP might not have easy access to one and hence the suggestion, also if he tells us that pins 4,5 and 16 are not populated right there we can tell him that it's not [E]OBD compliant

                    Thanks
                    Paul
                    www.obdpros.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      @p2psmurf: good luck with seraching device which support your car.
                      I have Fiat Stilo 1.9JTD year 2003 and Im try VAG-COM and obdpros interface and both doesn't work on my car.
                      In idle when car have 900rpm all software show me 220-230rpm (in hyper terminal when convert to DEC is same) then speed when Im stoped show 0kmh when moving show 255kmh, both temperature show 110C... So nothing is not useable except rpm if I will create own application...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by michbound View Post
                        If you list out all the pins that are populated we can make an educated guess on wether the car might be OBD II compliant or not
                        I'm currently away from this car (out of country)and would be able to tell the populated pins in a couple of weeks...

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                        • #13
                          Dejan, there are several devices that support the Fiat factory protocol.
                          These are professional after-market scanners and of course will cost serious money (think several thousand dollars). But then you get access to not just the engine, but Abs, Airbag and others as well. These scanners are produced by Bosch, NexTech, Launch and many others.

                          Michbound, I've got a nice example for you.
                          The Ford F150 when sold in the USA was of course OBD2 compliant.
                          However, when sold in Australia you could not read DTC's with a OBD2 scanner, because the format returned was different (more bytes per DTC). The connector and the pinning in Australia was exactly the same as in the USA. So, connector pinning doesn't mean anything.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by p2psmurf View Post
                            Dejan, there are several devices that support the Fiat factory protocol.
                            These are professional after-market scanners and of course will cost serious money (think several thousand dollars). But then you get access to not just the engine, but Abs, Airbag and others as well. These scanners are produced by Bosch, NexTech, Launch and many others.
                            I know that tools which use in service garage support my car but is expensive We are looking for cheap solutions...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              OBD tool

                              Hey Palio is compactabe i guess
                              and think the connector is an MPX97 or so they call it
                              but scan tools are costly

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