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SPOOF the OnStar module? I bet it would be a popular item

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  • SPOOF the OnStar module? I bet it would be a popular item

    I've seen threads about possibly tapping into the RAW GPS data for CarPC use, and even using the OnStar microphone, but what I'd love to see is the ability to tap into the OnStar (GMLan?) and trick my display above my steering wheel to show GPS/etc information, a la true Onstar service.

    I love how that works. Does anyone know what it would take to use a CarPC to 'spoof' the OnStar module, and get this sort of functionality?

    There is a wealth of information, controls, etc, available to this system, similar to the BMWs with the I-BUS system.

    I know that the GM StageII scanner can pull all this information, as well as update the OnStar and all other system firmware through the standard OBDII port. I love the idea of full-integration here.

    It seems like there would be a big market for this, considering how many people have OnStar-equipped cars, (and how many people don't renew their subscription.) I would not be opposed to removing my OnStar unit completely, and tying those connections into my CarPC somehow.

    Any thoughts on the matter?

  • #2


    i like this idea, we will have to see what people say in the morning
    - Project: Unified Car Control
    - Original OpenMobile Interface Designer

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    • #3
      I've done some more research on this, and it appears that you can tap into the gmlan/canbus to do exactly what I'm saying. You can control windows, locks, remote start/kill, chang a/c controls, you name it.

      I just haven't seen anyone take it to the level I am suggesting. I will definitely be breaking out some microcontrollers and seeing what I can play with. I would love to be able to remote-control my car via the internet... This would work on every GM car in the last 5 years or so.

      I even saw some documentation that suggests you can track how hard you push the brake pedal... Imagine the possibilities

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ScrapMaker View Post
        I've done some more research on this, and it appears that you can tap into the gmlan/canbus to do exactly what I'm saying. You can control windows, locks, remote start/kill, chang a/c controls, you name it.

        I just haven't seen anyone take it to the level I am suggesting. I will definitely be breaking out some microcontrollers and seeing what I can play with. I would love to be able to remote-control my car via the internet... This would work on every GM car in the last 5 years or so.

        I even saw some documentation that suggests you can track how hard you push the brake pedal... Imagine the possibilities
        I saw it done but i'm blanking on the name of the company that was showing it off. They make gauge console replacements for GMLAN equipped cars.

        Edit:
        there should be an mp3car video from CES of the company i'm talking about....maybe they caught a clip
        openMobile - An open source C# Front End (why choose openMobile?)
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        • #5
          Originally posted by ScrapMaker View Post
          I've done some more research on this, and it appears that you can tap into the gmlan/canbus to do exactly what I'm saying. You can control windows, locks, remote start/kill, chang a/c controls, you name it.

          I just haven't seen anyone take it to the level I am suggesting. I will definitely be breaking out some microcontrollers and seeing what I can play with. I would love to be able to remote-control my car via the internet... This would work on every GM car in the last 5 years or so.

          I even saw some documentation that suggests you can track how hard you push the brake pedal... Imagine the possibilities
          Accelerator pedal position/throttle position are standard OBDII PIDs.

          Someone I know hooked up a CAN interface to the OBD port, then called OnStar and told them that he locked the keys inside. From there, it was a simple matter of replaying the sequence of messages they wirelessly sent to the car. So what you want to do, is certainly doable.

          Vitaliy
          OBDLink MX: world's smallest, fastest, most advanced OBD/Bluetooth adapter with SW and MS CAN support. Read the review to learn more.
          Need to look up a diagnostic trouble code? Try the most up-to-date, free DTCsearch.com!

          You cannot send me a private message using this forum. Use my email instead: vitaliy[@]scantool.net.

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          • #6
            hrm I didn't know OBDII tracked BRAKE pedal position at multiple points, to judge how hard you're pushing it down. That's cool.

            gmlan is a bit more complicated than the single-wire low-speed can bus, but you can definitely still do a lot with it, like you said.

            I'm still curious about the physical/electrical aspects of the two networks, single/low and twin/high. Are the signals traveling to a main unit somewhere, similar to a router, or is it more like a 10baseT network with terminators? Thing is, you can remove devices and the network continues to work, so I don't know.

            it seems like if the low speed is a single wire, it has to be hard to negotiate 2-way communication...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ScrapMaker View Post
              I'm still curious about the physical/electrical aspects of the two networks, single/low and twin/high. Are the signals traveling to a main unit somewhere, similar to a router, or is it more like a 10baseT network with terminators? Thing is, you can remove devices and the network continues to work, so I don't know.

              it seems like if the low speed is a single wire, it has to be hard to negotiate 2-way communication...
              Its similar to a ring network....a lot of the same principles apply. No central unit (aka weak point) although the high/low speed bridge is a potential point of failure.
              openMobile - An open source C# Front End (why choose openMobile?)
              - Always Recruiting Developers -
              Like what you see? Donations are always welcome

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              • #8
                Originally posted by justchat_1 View Post
                Its similar to a ring network....a lot of the same principles apply. No central unit (aka weak point) although the high/low speed bridge is a potential point of failure.
                I'm curious, if it's a ring network, then if I removed the plug from the back of my headunit, or yanked the onstar module--wouldn't that kill the network entirely? I know you can unplug these things and the car runs fine... so somehow it must pass through the cable, even if it's not plugged into a unit..

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                • #9
                  CAN is a bus topology. You can add and remove nodes from the network.

                  With both single and dual wire CAN, the bus is used for both reception and transmission. The dual wire configuration provides better noise immunity and thus allows for higher bit rates.

                  As was mentioned, CAN is similar to Ethernet. One big difference is that CAN uses a non-destructive collision detection mechanism (arbitration). If two nodes start transmitting at the same time, one of them will eventually win arbitration and the other node will stop transmitting.

                  Every node has an address (or multiple addresses) assigned to it, which is encoded in the header of each CAN frame. Unless a frame is addressed to a node, it will not be accepted by the node.

                  Vitaliy

                  PS I see that I misread the message about reading the position of the break pedal. My bad.
                  OBDLink MX: world's smallest, fastest, most advanced OBD/Bluetooth adapter with SW and MS CAN support. Read the review to learn more.
                  Need to look up a diagnostic trouble code? Try the most up-to-date, free DTCsearch.com!

                  You cannot send me a private message using this forum. Use my email instead: vitaliy[@]scantool.net.

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