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  • Software for a mustang?

    Hey every ODBII app I have tried does not connect to my car. I have a 2002 Mustang GT. Does anyone have any experience with mustangs and ODBII that could help me out? I need it to view alot of stats now that i put down 400 RWHP and need to monitor alot of stuff.

  • #2
    do the apps work with other obdii-enabled vehicles?
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    • #3
      I drive a 2003 Mustang GT. Our vehicles use J1850PWM and I've never had a problem.

      It's probably a problem with your software or vehicle interface. What's your setup?

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      • #4
        I have a laptop with a serial cable from my SuperChips tuner that plugs in to the ODBII port under the dash. I believe that is the correct cable I need right?

        I am running digimoto lite as a test recently.

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        • #5
          Digimoto works with the elmscan based vehicle interfaces. Only software that comes directly from superchips would be compatible with your flash tuner. It's a completely proprietary interface. You would need to call superchips and ask what software you can buy that will work with your hardware.

          Otherwise you can buy a hardware/software bundle from www.palmerperformance.com. I've used his PCMScan software on my Mustang and it's pretty good.

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          • #6
            Hmmm ok I thought that serial cable was universal and the tuner did all the special stuff. O well.

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            • #7
              A vehicle interface acts like a PC-to-Vehicle gateway. It will accept commands on serial/usb/ethernet/etc from the PC and translate them for the vehicle's iso/pwm/vpw/can network.

              There's an international PassThru standard published by the Society of Automotive Engineers (J2534) that defines how a standard vehicle interface should work. It describes a device driver that allows you to connect, read, write, apply filters, assert programming voltages, and many other functions. Unfortunately your flashtuner doesn't comply with this standard, so it can only be used with the superchips software. A lot of vendors make their boxes non-standard to lock users into buying only their products.

              You would need a standard interface to be compatible with third-party software.

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              • #8
                Ok cool i'll look in to the link you gave me.

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                • #9
                  Digimoto actually works with both the ELM and mOByDic based interfaces, but as was already stated here, you will need one of those pieces of hardware to operate the software correctly.
                  Joel Konecny
                  Digimoto OBDII Diagnostics

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                  • #10
                    mustang

                    Originally posted by joeyoravec
                    Digimoto works with the elmscan based vehicle interfaces. Only software that comes directly from superchips would be compatible with your flash tuner. It's a completely proprietary interface. You would need to call superchips and ask what software you can buy that will work with your hardware.

                    Otherwise you can buy a hardware/software bundle from www.palmerperformance.com. I've used his PCMScan software on my Mustang and it's pretty good.

                    so how do you like your OBDII setup.. .using pmscan.... have you used digimoto demo? .. any custom gauges on either?... im thinking of ordering digimoto and the OBDII all in one scan tool..

                    thanks for your time
                    69 Mustang
                    408 clevor AFD 2v heads - Viper T56
                    Audio:RUX-C701, PXA-H701, MRV-F545, (2) MRD-M1005, SIR-SC-H1, DMHD1000, Dayton Audio: (2) RS180-4, (2) RS28F-4, (2) RSS265HO-44 DVC

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by crabbdaddy
                      so how do you like your OBDII setup.. .using pmscan.... have you used digimoto demo? .. any custom gauges on either?... im thinking of ordering digimoto and the OBDII all in one scan tool..
                      Keep in mind, I'm an engineer and work on the Mongoose interface cable so you might think I'm biased. Neither the elm nor the all-in-one cables earn my respect. Here's why:
                      1. Vehicle networks are fast, but most low end tools use an RS-232 host interface. They might advertise USB but actually use an FT232BM usb-to-serial converter chip. Mongoose is among the few to support full-bandwidth communication with a full-speed (12mbps) USB 2.0 host interface.
                      2. The SAE has published a standard (SAE J2534) for vehicle interfaces. Mongoose uses this standard device driver and works with the TIS software to reflash GM vehicles. In contrast, other low-cost hobbyist equipment is often completely proprietary. Will low-end junk even be supported once inexpensive, standard cables dominate the market? Doubtful.
                      3. You can download free Mongoose firmware upgrades to fix problems or add features. Try elm5 firmware v1.0 for a good laugh. It had problems locking to a protocol, was case sensitive to certain commands, etc. Bugs always exist, but at least DrewTech offers field upgrades.
                      Now back to software. Digimoto has attractive 3D gauges with shadows and nice colors. PCMScan is still attractive, but seems more appropriate for the CarPC environment because you can configure a custom dashboard. With a smaller in-dash screen this is often really important. Also PCMScan lets you data log and playback later (when you're not busy driving!). The choice is pretty clear for me.

                      Another funny thing -- check their webpages. Digimoto 4.03 released in October 2005 hasn't been updated for half a year. And now he's reselling PCMScan (a competitor??). There's another good reason to reconsider your plan!

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                      • #12
                        mongoose

                        Originally posted by joeyoravec
                        Keep in mind, I'm an engineer and work on the Mongoose interface cable so you might think I'm biased. Neither the elm nor the all-in-one cables earn my respect. Here's why:
                        1. Vehicle networks are fast, but most low end tools use an RS-232 host interface. They might advertise USB but actually use an FT232BM usb-to-serial converter chip. Mongoose is among the few to support full-bandwidth communication with a full-speed (12mbps) USB 2.0 host interface.
                        2. The SAE has published a standard (SAE J2534) for vehicle interfaces. Mongoose uses this standard device driver and works with the TIS software to reflash GM vehicles. In contrast, other low-cost hobbyist equipment is often completely proprietary. Will low-end junk even be supported once inexpensive, standard cables dominate the market? Doubtful.
                        3. You can download free Mongoose firmware upgrades to fix problems or add features. Try elm5 firmware v1.0 for a good laugh. It had problems locking to a protocol, was case sensitive to certain commands, etc. Bugs always exist, but at least DrewTech offers field upgrades.
                        Now back to software. Digimoto has attractive 3D gauges with shadows and nice colors. PCMScan is still attractive, but seems more appropriate for the CarPC environment because you can configure a custom dashboard. With a smaller in-dash screen this is often really important. Also PCMScan lets you data log and playback later (when you're not busy driving!). The choice is pretty clear for me.

                        Another funny thing -- check their webpages. Digimoto 4.03 released in October 2005 hasn't been updated for half a year. And now he's reselling PCMScan (a competitor??). There's another good reason to reconsider your plan!
                        ok... good points... yeah i feel your pain im an electronics tech .... for the last 16 years.... so when does the ford mongoose come out ....? something tells me you already have it....
                        69 Mustang
                        408 clevor AFD 2v heads - Viper T56
                        Audio:RUX-C701, PXA-H701, MRV-F545, (2) MRD-M1005, SIR-SC-H1, DMHD1000, Dayton Audio: (2) RS180-4, (2) RS28F-4, (2) RSS265HO-44 DVC

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by crabbdaddy
                          ok... good points... yeah i feel your pain im an electronics tech .... for the last 16 years.... so when does the ford mongoose come out ....? something tells me you already have it....
                          The euro/asian version was released in January, and we've been on schedule to release a new one every 3-4 months. The Ford is planned for "summer 2006" and the Chrysler after that. Of course there's a prototype sitting on my desk . But the testing, packaging, manuals, etc always take time. It's on track for a timely release.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by joeyoravec
                            [LIST=1][*]Vehicle networks are fast,
                            Actually they are not fast. The data speed is limited by the PCM's code, and even the fastest of the more common OBDII protocols is still limited to less than 50 kbps at the ALDL port. While CAN data rates are much faster (1 Mb/s), it is certainly not as widely implemented in todays motor vehicles as J1850 or ISO9141.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mechanic
                              Actually they are not fast. The data speed is limited by the PCM's code, and even the fastest of the more common OBDII protocols is still limited to less than 50 kbps at the ALDL port. While CAN promises to be much faster (1 Mb/s), it is certainly not widely implemented in todays motor vehicles.
                              Understood, fast is a relative term. So let's dig into the problem:
                              • Ford SCP: 41.6 kBaud lowspeed, 83.2 kBaud highspeed
                              • GM Class2: 10.4 kBaud lowspeed, 41.6 kBaud highspeed
                              • Most ISO imports: 10.4 kBaud, can be increased in some cases
                              • North American CAN: 500 kBaud fixed, by specification
                              Notice that all of the above are too fast for elm5's default 9600 host interface. Even if you used the elm's 38.4k rate and binary mode (unsupported by most software), it still couldn't handle a saturated network. It's like drinking straw into a firehose. The elm5's buffer will overflow and you will drop messages.

                              On your other comment -- let's examine some older controllers. Both the GM LS-1 (Camaro) and the Ford EEC-V (Mustang) engine controllers service generic OBD requests at a very low priority. Using mode 1 you can expect max 30 responses/sec. Don't assume that the PCM is slow just because most freebie software sucks. If you build a DPID you'll get 150-200 responses/sec in both cases. And this is on J1850 with two ancient PCMs!!

                              The low end RS-232 junk can read/clear codes fine, but speed matters if you want to visualize or datalog engine data.

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