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info on CEL obd code P0014 ?

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  • info on CEL obd code P0014 ?

    So my CEL came on yesterday for about 20 miles and then went off. It hasn't come back on yet. I pulled the code (gotta love having a scanner ) and a
    P0014 came up.

    the only info I could find is:

    camshaft posistion actuator B (bank 1 )

    timing over-advanced

    I know B camshaft is exahust one and bank 1 = cylinder 1

    Can anyone expand on this?

    please share your knowledge.
    Thanks!

  • #2
    your codes are COMPLETELY car specific. Check in a forum related to your car.
    mp3Car.com Senior Tech Blogger (Want a product reviewed? Contact me.)
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    • #3
      already did that. i thought maybe someone else here might have some info.

      I thought OBD II codes were universal ?

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      • #4
        i checked my manual for my altima and i have no p0014 codes. At least tell us what kinda car u drive.
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        • #5
          it's a 2004 chevy colorado.

          if your altima had the same symtom/problem and we connected an OBD II scanner, it would throw a P0014 code also. the OBD II codes are universal.

          right?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by th2855 View Post
            it's a 2004 chevy colorado.

            if your altima had the same symtom/problem and we connected an OBD II scanner, it would throw a P0014 code also. the OBD II codes are universal.

            right?
            No.

            Originally posted by Sonicxtacy02 View Post
            your codes are COMPLETELY car specific.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Endon View Post
              No.

              thanks.

              if anyone has any info pertinant to my problem, please share.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by th2855 View Post
                it's a 2004 chevy colorado.

                if your altima had the same symtom/problem and we connected an OBD II scanner, it would throw a P0014 code also. the OBD II codes are universal.

                right?
                i'm afraid thats wrong. Codes are specific. pick up any haynes manual and skip to the trouble codes. You'll see there are different codes for the same cars just different years. If the codes were all the same we'd need no codes.. it'd just say go get this crap fixed
                mp3Car.com Senior Tech Blogger (Want a product reviewed? Contact me.)
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                • #9
                  ok, lets see if I understand this correctly. codes for vehicles are different, but the translations are the same?

                  if I do a google search for ODB codes, several sites pop up. each site has the same meaning for each code. Does this mean there is a different set of codes for each specific vehicle?

                  please be patient with me. I'm here to learn.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by th2855 View Post
                    ok, lets see if I understand this correctly. codes for vehicles are different, but the translations are the same?

                    if I do a google search for ODB codes, several sites pop up. each site has the same meaning for each code. Does this mean there is a different set of codes for each specific vehicle?

                    please be patient with me. I'm here to learn.
                    The communications protocal, for the most part, is standard. There ARE standard codes, but not all of them.

                    For Example, say Code P001, that COULD mean O2 Sensor value out of range. That COULD be a standard code (They generally have to do with emissions issues, so that the state tester can quickly see if you threw any emissions related codes) However, other codes are vehicle specific. My WRX might throw an Overboost code of 12345, while 12345 for your Chevy could be Spinner tires out of whack (just trying to be funny here). A Mitsubishi might throw code 54321 to indicate overboost conditions.

                    Is that helping at all.

                    Also, check out this webpage. http://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/index.php


                    Michael
                    ...I love the French language...especially to curse with...Nom de Dieu de putain de bordel de merde de saloperies de connards d'enculés de ta mère. You see, it's like wiping your *** with silk, I love it.

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                    • #11
                      thanks Mike.

                      I guess I should be in remedial OBD school.

                      Here is the answer:

                      DTC P0014
                      Circuit Description

                      * The cam phasing system is a hydraulically actuated phase shifting mechanism. The powertrain control module (PCM) supplies the ignition positive driver and ground circuits. A pulse width modulated (PWM) driver controls the amount that the camshaft actuator solenoid assembly advances or retards the exhaust camshaft. The exhaust camshaft is commanded to a maximum retard position of 25 degrees. When the exhaust camshaft is retarded at the maximum rate, the duty cycle of the signal is at 100 percent. The maximum advance rate has a 0 percent duty cycle. Other than when the camshaft is at full advance, a 50 percent duty cycle is used to maintain a steady retard angle.
                      * If the desired and actual cam phase angle error exceeds its tolerance value for a certain amount of time, then DTC P0014 will set.

                      DTC Descriptor

                      This diagnostic procedure supports the following DTC:

                      DTC P0014 Exhaust Camshaft Position (CMP) System Performance
                      Conditions for Running the DTC

                      * The engine speed is greater than 1,350 RPM.
                      * The PCM has enabled the cam phaser.
                      * The system voltage is greater than 11 volts.

                      Conditions for Setting the DTC

                      * The vehicle must be driven.
                      * The difference between the desired CAM phase angle and the actual CAM phase angle is more than 3.75 degrees.
                      * The CAM phaser is steady for 3 seconds.
                      * The condition is present for 3 seconds.

                      Action Taken When the DTC Sets

                      * The control module illuminates the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) on the second consecutive ignition cycle that the diagnostic runs and fails.
                      * The control module records the operating conditions at the time the diagnostic fails. The first time the diagnostic fails, the control module stores this information in the Failure Records. If the diagnostic reports a failure on the second consecutive ignition cycle, the control module records the operating conditions at the time of the failure. The control module writes the operating conditions to the Freeze Frame and updates the Failure Records.

                      Conditions for Clearing the MIL/DTC

                      * The control module turns OFF the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) after 3 consecutive ignition cycles that the diagnostic runs and does not fail.
                      * A current DTC, Last Test Failed, clears when the diagnostic runs and passes.
                      * A history DTC clears after 40 consecutive warm-up cycles, if no failures are reported by this or any other emission related diagnostic.
                      * Clear the MIL and the DTC with a scan tool.

                      Diagnostic Aids

                      * The scan tool cam phase control function increments the cam phaser in 10 percent increments. Each increment equates to 2.5 degrees of cam phasing. A cam phase angle of 15 degrees is achieved by commanding the phaser with the scan tool to 60 percent.
                      * Inspect any engine mechanical work that has been performed recently. Verify that the engine timing has not been altered.
                      * If this DTC is set along with any crankshaft position (CKP) or camshaft position (CMP) sensor DTCs, then both the CKP and CMP sensor DTCs should be diagnosed prior to performing this diagnostic. The PCM uses both inputs to determine the actual camshaft position.
                      * Check the following items:
                      o A loose CMP sensor causing a variance in the sensor signal
                      o A loose CKP sensor causing a variance in the sensor signal
                      o Excessive free play in the timing chain and gear assembly
                      o Debris or contamination interfering with the CMP actuator solenoid valve assembly
                      o Debris or contamination interfering with the CMP actuator assembly
                      * Engine oil has a major impact upon the camshaft actuation system's responsiveness. Oil temperature, viscosity, and quality can slow and/or inhibit the phaser's ability to reach a desired phase angle.
                      * If an intermittent condition exists, refer to Intermittent Conditions .

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