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First Fab job. Where to go from here?

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  • First Fab job. Where to go from here?

    OK I had my first chance to play with bondo-glass tonight. It was much harder to work with than I thought it would be. I thought it would be more pasty than chunky.

    Since I now have a fairly good base with bondo-glass. Could I switch to something a little easier to work with for the final layers?

    ScAndal
    Attached Files

  • #2
    You still have huge chunks missing for some reason. Use the fiberglass bondo to get those filled in. Then for the little holes, and final shaping you can use regular bondo. For rough shaping, use what you have been.
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    • #3
      Thanks for the feedback. What tool do you recommend using when applying the bondo-glass? I was just using a wood block and maybe thats my problem?

      ScAndal

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      • #4
        use gloves and then your hand. Your finger is the best tool.
        Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
        1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
        30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
        15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
        Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

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        • #5
          Ah I didn't even think about that

          That would be so much easier.

          Thanks for the tips. I'll post how round 2 goes tomorrow.

          ScAndal

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          • #6
            FIrst off, those holes are too big to just fill in with the stuff you are using, which I dont' think is BondoGlass.... You need to sand down those craters until they are smaller so they become shallower.

            Why do you think the product you are using is bondoglass? Does it say bondoglass, or are you just assuming that because it is fiberglass reinforced bondo that it is bondoglass? The reason I ask is because it doesn't look like from the picture that that stuff is bondo glass. It looks like kitty's hair or tiger's hair. Much harder to manipulate than bondoglass. The difference? Bondoglass(which is just a brand name like Kleenex is) refers to a bodyfiller/SHORT strand fiberglass mixture. Kitty's hair or tiger's hair or other brands refers to a bodyfiller/LONG hair fiberglass mixture.

            Often when I fabricate something, I use both. I lay my base of kitty's hair, then I sand down flat and smooth, do my major shaping with the major strength product. Then I go back and fill and build up with Bondoglass. Then I move on to a lightweight body filler like Litebondo to fill in the dimples and provide some fine tune shaping. Then a nice glazing putty to smooth it all out. Always sanding between. I knock down my first coat of kittys hair using first a DA sander and then 36 grit handpaper. Then I go to 60 grit. After the coat of Bondoglass I go to 80 grit and then 100 grit. I move on to 150 after the litecoat and so on. All the way up to 500 grit.
            Its not the cards you're dealt, its how you play the hand!

            Originally posted by ryuandwings
            Where can I get a roll of tin foil?
            I been looking for that all over the net, but I can't find it.
            Please help.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 2k1Toaster View Post
              Your finger is the best tool.
              that's what she said!

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              • #8
                I would suggest you dump those bondo you have in your garage and buy the 3M Automix or SEM flexible bumper repair which can be use as filler. Easier to sand and work with. I use a piece of plastic to apply and spread filler material.

                The Dynatron you see in the picture above use as adhensive re-enforce the pieces.

                check this thread
                http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/fabr...ory-bezel.html
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                • #9
                  Um, I wouldn't be so quick to admit that Spoon, If thats what she said, it says something about the other tools in the garage, no?


                  OP - can you verify if the material you are using is short strand or long.

                  @ Matrix, by now, the bezel is already mostly encapselated in bondoglass or whatever it is. There is no reason not to continue this way. I have used many abs plastic and plastic repair materials, including those shown above. They work quite well, but Are not superior to bondo glass necessarily for all projects. They offer more flex and that is good in some regards, but not in some cases. I think it would be a little easier to finish this project with the materials it was started with. This time at least.
                  Its not the cards you're dealt, its how you play the hand!

                  Originally posted by ryuandwings
                  Where can I get a roll of tin foil?
                  I been looking for that all over the net, but I can't find it.
                  Please help.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Using a putty/bondo spreader that you can buy at any auto parts store is better and easier than using your fingers to spread the bondo. Also sanding when the bondo is drying at a certain phase that it goes through that makes it fell like clay is the easiest and fastest way to sand things down smoother.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by volum3rider View Post
                      Using a putty/bondo spreader that you can buy at any auto parts store is better and easier than using your fingers to spread the bondo. Also sanding when the bondo is drying at a certain phase that it goes through that makes it fell like clay is the easiest and fastest way to sand things down smoother.
                      Very good tip about sanding while drying. The only suggestion I would make is that you are either extemely careful while doing this or avoid doing so when you are bondoing a material that bondo does not oridinarily bond well to like abs plastic. In that case, extra drying time is better before sanding.
                      Its not the cards you're dealt, its how you play the hand!

                      Originally posted by ryuandwings
                      Where can I get a roll of tin foil?
                      I been looking for that all over the net, but I can't find it.
                      Please help.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is turning out to be a pretty good fabricating thread.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by J187 View Post
                          Very good tip about sanding while drying. The only suggestion I would make is that you are either extemely careful while doing this or avoid doing so when you are bondoing a material that bondo does not oridinarily bond well to like abs plastic. In that case, extra drying time is better before sanding.
                          Nah, you'll be alright. I've done it more than a few times before and it sticks fine. Only way I can see it not being strong enough to sand, while the bondo is drying, is if the piece of plastic was extremly dirty/oily before bondo was used on it.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by volum3rider View Post
                            Nah, you'll be alright. I've done it more than a few times before and it sticks fine. Only way I can see it not being strong enough to sand, while the bondo is drying, is if the piece of plastic was extremly dirty/oily before bondo was used on it.
                            Depends on the shape and integrity of the piece you are working on. From years of car audio fabrication - I can personally gaurantee that there are plenty of situations where bondo will not adhere to abs plastics until fully cured, or at least most of the way cured. Even better to score to the surface for better adhesion - bondo is not a natural mate for ABS plastics...I have seen the product lift and not cure with a solid bond and over time, split or crack, with no other obvious causes except that it had been handled too early. My personal opinion is just let it cure and put in the tiny little extra effort to sand it then. If you apply the material properly, and sand properly, it really isn't much work. You apply tight and smooth as best you can. Knock down the high spots w/ a rasp and then continue w/ 36g to do general shaping and it sands perfectly fine and easy. Especially better to let dry when you first start using bondo, because it will give you a better indication as to whether or not you used the proper amount of hardener - something that takes most a little practice to get used to. If you start sanding while its drying, you won't really know whether or not it was going to cure properly.
                            Its not the cards you're dealt, its how you play the hand!

                            Originally posted by ryuandwings
                            Where can I get a roll of tin foil?
                            I been looking for that all over the net, but I can't find it.
                            Please help.

                            Comment

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