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  • PC Case Material?

    I've got mine mounted on plexiglass now with no covering underneath the driver's seat. I'd rather be enclosed, of sorts with some in/out fans on either end. Mainly so I can make a few passes at the track as well as do donuts with no worries.

    I've searched, but can't discover what people make their cases out of. Any suggestions, preferably metal because it'll be easy to bend?

    Thanks!
    2000 Pontiac Trans Am Firehawk #102
    Processor: AMD 64 X2 BE-2350 (Dual Core)
    Motherboard: ABit NF-M2S (Micro-ATX)
    Memory: 2GIG Crucial DDR2 667
    Hard Drive: WD 160GIG
    Monitor: 7" Lilliput 629GL
    Front End: CentraFuse With Navigation

  • #2
    Mine is MDF.
    Others have used plexiglass, fiberglass, and sheet aluminum.
    Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
    How about the Wiki?



    Under normal circumstances, a signature would go here.

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    • #3
      All mine is mounted inside the rear panel enclosure. i have a sort of pocket inside the boot, and i cut the bottom out of it, and mounted the atx main board flat to it, and m2atx to the side, hard drives are fixed to the bottom near where the jack used to be... so i can remove the panel covers in 2 seconds for access. Using an fm transmitter to get sound on head unit, and dont get no noise at all from pc.

      I drive a frontera sport 2.2rs

      hope this helps

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      • #4
        Oh yeah. I forgot that subset of users who make their cases out of nothing at all!
        Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
        How about the Wiki?



        Under normal circumstances, a signature would go here.

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        • #5
          I wish I could mount mine behind a panel, but there's no room under any for my board. I was kind hoping for the glovebox, but micro-ATX is too big. I could mount it in the cubbyhole in my hatch, but with the sub box, it'll be pretty hard for it to breathe. My only option was under my seat and no one sits there anyways so it's fine. Just worried about it sliding around and even more so when it's raining sideways down here and gets on the board.

          Sheet alum might be my best bet, or at least cleaner than fiberglass. Any suggestions on who sells it and what thickness I'd need to make it sturdy enough, yet bendable?
          2000 Pontiac Trans Am Firehawk #102
          Processor: AMD 64 X2 BE-2350 (Dual Core)
          Motherboard: ABit NF-M2S (Micro-ATX)
          Memory: 2GIG Crucial DDR2 667
          Hard Drive: WD 160GIG
          Monitor: 7" Lilliput 629GL
          Front End: CentraFuse With Navigation

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          • #6
            Originally posted by DarquePervert View Post
            Oh yeah. I forgot that subset of users who make their cases out of nothing at all!



            Lol, well its only temp fit at moment, want to get a waterproof case, for incase i get water in while wading Just on look out at moment for right enclosure. ive got plenty of space, But for now it works , and case cost me nowt

            Was maybe looking at a plastic cake box, with a couple of fans in the top for cooling, with holes silconed up where cables exit. havent decided yet though.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DarquePervert View Post
              Mine is MDF.
              Others have used plexiglass, fiberglass, and sheet aluminum.
              Don't forget wood users too~



              Someone's Install

              Some other person's install (I swore this person had it fastened to the wood too, so he/she might have changed it to a slim case)

              Crawdaddy is making everything out of wood!

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              • #8
                I use plexi for all 3 of my installed.
                cheap easy to work with and glue together (when you use Weldon to glue).
                I want to make the case in the Supra a little smaller after I build the heater to bend plexi posted by Greatwhite.
                2004 Matrix XR A7N8X-VM/400 AMD XP-M 2500+, DS-ATX
                89 Supra Turbo P3 [email protected]/Abit BE6 II, Alpine M-BUS Car2PC.
                Y2K Accord Dell GX150
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                • #9
                  Does anyone remember that thread with that one guy that was adamant about our collective social responsibility to use cases that concealed EMI (metal)? I can't seem to find it.
                  It's been a while...

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                  • #10
                    Mine base is made out of plexi but it's hard to bend right. I was hoping metal would be easier, but the plan I have is to mount the PSU, HDD and mobo to fit inside a small space that's 4" high (under driver's seat). That Weldon glue, is it actually Weldon as the brand or "weld-on"? It dries clear, so that's a plus. Might be the only choice I have. How did you cut the plexi? I used a dremel and sides aren't all that smooth.
                    2000 Pontiac Trans Am Firehawk #102
                    Processor: AMD 64 X2 BE-2350 (Dual Core)
                    Motherboard: ABit NF-M2S (Micro-ATX)
                    Memory: 2GIG Crucial DDR2 667
                    Hard Drive: WD 160GIG
                    Monitor: 7" Lilliput 629GL
                    Front End: CentraFuse With Navigation

                    Comment


                    • #11


                      one side is welded sheetmetal, the other 3 sides will be abs plastic sheet, 1/8" thich, and the top will be mdf or plywood with padding and some kind of fabric on top.

                      as for you, i would build the rest of the case out of plexiglass as its easy to glue together (some plexi shavings + acetone [real acetone, not fingernail polish remover])

                      i always cut my plexi with a bandsaw when possible, using the highest TPI blade possible.
                      1998 Toyota 4Runner SR5 V6 4x4 in Evergreen Pearl Metallic, Lifted, Locked, and Armored. CarPc in custom console with molded touchscreen.
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                      Photobucket is being updated, if a picture i posted no longer works, please PM me.

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                      • #12
                        Dremel tool works good for cutting plexi, also. Although, I dont find working with plexi very easy.
                        Mike

                        My Rides:
                        '03 Vibe GT!

                        My AED GA!

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                        • #13
                          Bending plexi is easy as pie!

                          If you build this:

                          http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/fabr...ucks-less.html

                          Mine is mounted on an MDF base with angled sides. I then bent up a Plexi cover with a couple odd bends. Took about 1/2 hour to make the cover. I'll see if I can dig up a pic or two. You could also use the tool above to make a simple box style cover.

                          *edit- here's a pic:*


                          cheers

                          BJ
                          For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return.
                          Leonardo Da Vinci

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                          • #14
                            Yeah, I tried a dremel and cutoff wheel and all it did was melt the plexi. Maybe I should use some 1/8" instead? I know with 1/8" I can score it and break it for nice clean straight cuts.

                            I'm kind of thinking of making a hindged case. make the bottom and duplice the top. Then I'd have 2 sides to mount the mobo, PSU and HDD on.

                            Lexan bubbles when heated with a heat gun. Does plexi or acrylic? I know one of them you can heat the crap out of it and no bubbles, just bending. Any ideas?
                            2000 Pontiac Trans Am Firehawk #102
                            Processor: AMD 64 X2 BE-2350 (Dual Core)
                            Motherboard: ABit NF-M2S (Micro-ATX)
                            Memory: 2GIG Crucial DDR2 667
                            Hard Drive: WD 160GIG
                            Monitor: 7" Lilliput 629GL
                            Front End: CentraFuse With Navigation

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by InfiniteReality View Post
                              Yeah, I tried a dremel and cutoff wheel and all it did was melt the plexi. Maybe I should use some 1/8" instead? I know with 1/8" I can score it and break it for nice clean straight cuts.

                              I'm kind of thinking of making a hindged case. make the bottom and duplice the top. Then I'd have 2 sides to mount the mobo, PSU and HDD on.

                              Lexan bubbles when heated with a heat gun. Does plexi or acrylic? I know one of them you can heat the crap out of it and no bubbles, just bending. Any ideas?
                              You need a rotary cutoff saw for your dremel and use a lower speed. The saw looks like a tiny little circular saw blade with an arbour on it for the dremel. Costs around ten bucks IIRC.

                              The cutoff grinding wheel uses abrasion to cut, which causes heat, which melt the plexi. The saw cuts the plexi by removing chunks like a wood saw would, but it will melt it if you use too high a speed.

                              If your plexi is melting and bubbling with a heat gun, you're using too much heat.

                              Plexi and lexan are both acrylics. Lexan is just harder (essentially) and more expensive. Both will bubble and blister with too much heat, it's not just lexan that does it. Overall, lexan is a better product than plexiglass as it resists scratching and breaking better.

                              You can bend both with a heat gun (I've done it), but it is much more difficult than using a heater strip like I posted above. The problem with a heat gun is that it heats a large area instead of the strip that you want to bend. You have to usde a low heat setting and be very patient, move the heat gun and never let it rest on one spot. Place the acrylic on the edge of a table and sandwich it between the table and a heavy straight edge. Heat the bend line (you'll be at this for around 5 to ten minutes to get the heat right and even) and it will bend over the edge of the table. Try to keep the heat in the bend area as the acrylic may distort id the unsupported piece gets too warm outside the bend radius. it is very difficult to get the heat even this way and you may still end up with some "waviness" in the part that is unsupported.
                              A heater strip tool heats only the line you want and leaves the rest of the plastic hard so it bends nice and tight.

                              If all this seems too much, try cutting and gluing a box instead. Not as nice a result, but functional none the less!

                              Cheers
                              For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return.
                              Leonardo Da Vinci

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