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mdf or plywood pc case?

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  • mdf or plywood pc case?

    i will redo my pc case in wood ..

    so what type of material is better for carpc?

    plywood or mdf?
    Carputer to sell : http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/vbcl...?do=ad&id=2684

  • #2
    MDF is denser than plywood. If you use screws with MDF there's a finite number of times you can remove and reinstall them. If you work with MDF make sure you use a dust mask, you don't want to breath in that crap.

    It doesn't really matter though, either should work fine.

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    • #3
      mdf is denser but..

      is it more rigid than plywood?

      and wich is better for humidity and moisiture?
      Carputer to sell : http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/vbcl...?do=ad&id=2684

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      • #4
        Depends on the thickness. I don't know first hand, but I don't think you can get MDF as thin as plywood.

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        • #5
          ok so plywood would be more rigid than mdf in a 3/8 thick case


          ha...and i'm concerning about sound level in the case...so looking for a good compromise between the two

          thanks for your help
          Carputer to sell : http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/vbcl...?do=ad&id=2684

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          • #6
            I just checked you can get MDF as thin as 1/4". As far as sound level, the denser MDF will deaden the sound more than plywood.

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            • #7
              tthanks
              Carputer to sell : http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/vbcl...?do=ad&id=2684

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              • #8
                maybe a could put aluminium tape in the casing for interference...and cooling
                Carputer to sell : http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/vbcl...?do=ad&id=2684

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                • #9
                  The "R" value of MDF is pretty high, so keeping it cool wouldn't be a problem with a small fan pulling air in and push air out [or just a clear aperture to let hot air out]. Also do a Google search for T Nut. You can use these to mount the board so as to be able to mount, unmount, and remount multiple times. You can get these at Homedepot or Lowes. I couldn't find them on they're websites but I know their stores carry them.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by djvillar View Post
                    The "R" value of MDF is pretty high, so keeping it cool wouldn't be a problem with a small fan pulling air in and push air out [or just a clear aperture to let hot air out]. Also do a Google search for T Nut. You can use these to mount the board so as to be able to mount, unmount, and remount multiple times. You can get these at Homedepot or Lowes. I couldn't find them on they're websites but I know their stores carry them.
                    thanks very helpful
                    Carputer to sell : http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/vbcl...?do=ad&id=2684

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                    • #11
                      3mm thick MDF does exist.
                      Now Galileo is real. Muhahahahaha :p

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                      • #12
                        Just remember, being that MDF has good insulating value's heat from the outside won't get in but at the same time heat produced from the computer components won't get out either so a push and pull fan is vital.

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                        • #13
                          In thin panels, MDF is not very strong, and is probably not your best bet. If a wood case is what you want, then I'd recommend using something like thin furniture-grade plywood, which is sometimes labeled birch plywood. The furniture-grade material has many plies, where standard 1/4-inch (6mm) plywood may only have 3 plies. Furniture-grade material is sound wood all the way through each ply, where the standard stuff is guaranteed sound only on the face plies. Even the face plies may have some filler in them.

                          The insulation properties of MDF and plywood are similar; in fact, because MDF is resin-impregnated, plywood probably is the better insulator because it contains more airspace in the cellular structure.

                          In either case, you'll want to be sure you have enough airflow to pull heat off the components in the case, and you'll want a way to get cool air to them. Venting a case into a hot trunk and sucking hot air back into the PC isn't ideal; see if you can duct air to the case inlet from inside the vehicle, where cooler air will be available.

                          For construction, Gorilla Glue, or a similar urethane glue, is wonderful stuff. Triangular corner blocks will help keep everything strong.
                          .
                          If just enough is really good, then too much ought to be perfect.

                          2006 Scion xB with in-dash Atom & Lilliput 889GL -- Worklog at http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/work...res-links.html
                          .

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                          • #14
                            thanks for those precious advices
                            Carputer to sell : http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/vbcl...?do=ad&id=2684

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                            • #15
                              Not sure where you're putting this case or how you plan to finish it, but plywood is definitely better than MDF when it comes to moisture. Particle board, in my experience, even if it has "waterproof glue" seems to disintegrate pretty soon if exposed to water. If it doesn't fall apart, it still swells and messes things up. Water won't do the plywood any good either but it will hold up better. Someone mentioned MDF is denser - that isn't too noticeable for thinner panels, but when you get to thicker panels or more material it really makes a difference in the weight. Plywood is also much easier to fasten with screws as well.

                              If you need it, there are marine grades of plywood 4mm or even thinner available. Wood aircraft builders use some thin high-quality plywood as well but it will cost you and is probably overkill unless you really need and want thin.

                              In addition to t-nuts, there are threaded inserts which have a machine-screw thread on the inside and very sharp coarse threads on the outside that you screw into pre-drilled holes in the wood. I'm not sure how well they work in plywood as I've never tried it. In hardwood, I know you have to predrill the hole properly or they don't go in well at all.

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