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  • First Dash Bezel...

    I am trying my hand at my first dash bezel with the inspiration of turbocad6's sticky thread. How do you guys think it is coming along? Am I ready to start with the second product, which is the softer stuff, the flexible bumper repair kit? Let me know what you think.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    i think it still looks pretty rough-- that 2nd product should be applied after all the major shaping is done. to me, it looks like there is still a lot of shaping that needs to be done.

    sand, sand, sand, and when your sick of sanding, sand some more..
















    oh,did i mention the sanding?












    or some more sanding? check my custom tails--i've been there-- the only time i was convinced i did enough sanding was when the final painted piece was installed on the car--and by that time, i had spent at least 10-15hrs of solid sanding..

    at the end, you will actually start to be as loopy as this:
    My OLD 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT:
    "The Project That Never Ended, until it did"


    next project? subaru brz
    carpc undecided

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    • #3
      From the looks of the sand marks, you're using medium grit right now. Somewhere in the 150 range? You should be shaping this thing right now. Shape with 30 or 40 grit. It'll cut down on sanding. Sand with 150 off the bat is like cutting down a tree with a scapel when you should be using a chainsaw.

      Also you have to clean up the inside and outside edge. They will be like guide rails when you spread the softer stuff.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by djvillar View Post
        From the looks of the sand marks, you're using medium grit right now. Somewhere in the 150 range? You should be shaping this thing right now. Shape with 30 or 40 grit. It'll cut down on sanding. Sand with 150 off the bat is like cutting down a tree with a scapel when you should be using a chainsaw.

        Also you have to clean up the inside and outside edge. They will be like guide rails when you spread the softer stuff.
        I actually am using 40 grit right now. I guess I just haven't gone deep enough. I was afraid of separating what I had done. Would it be good when I don't see any more black? After this, would I add some more of the hard stuff or start with the soft stuff?

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        • #5
          What monitor are you putting in there? I would get an extra monitor bezel, chop it up, and place it in the dash where you want the final position. Then use the dynatron to blend the surfaces of the chopped bezel and the dash together. Then the bumper repair as lightweight filler.

          Being that your trying to make the whole thing from scratch, its going to be very difficult to maintain the form and the inside edge, especially if this is the first go at fabrication.

          You should only keep sanding till you don't see any black if the black is where you want the finished surface. If you want the finished surface to be higher, then no, don't keep sanding. You'll need to build the surface higher anyway. But I can't really tell where the end goal is from the pics.

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          • #6
            The monitor that will be going in there is a 15.4" LCD widescreen. It is just the panel though. If you notice, I do have the bezel that I attached to the back and then I was going to use double sided tape or similar to hold the LCD in place. There will also be a touchscreen in front of that though. The goal would be to basically blend that front surface into the dash bezel and then cut out the inside where I have the white space now. I did realize midway through that keeping a straight line on the inside was going to be a problem. Any tricks of the trade that might help here? I was thinking using a ruler somehow and a file to keep it straight.

            Comment


            • #7
              Like I said, you need a sharp edge before laying down a bunch of filler. There's no need to shape and file a straight edge when you can just have it already. Make a flat picture frame around, a window, around where the monitor will be. You can make this out of Popsicle sticks, bass wood, a sheet of plexiglas, whatever. Secure that in place after taping off the area. Now use filler like I said previously, using the dash and the frame as a guide... Yada yada yada.

              Comment


              • #8
                How do you think it looks?
                Brian @Nexations Creations

                Specialist in Custom Interior Fiberglass OEM Replication Work.

                AIM: Exus28
                E-Mail: [email protected]

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think djvillar is right. I am going to cut out that paper white part and use the bezel I molded in there as a guide line. I see now why I am still a little ways away. I think once I get that paper out and then sand a little more, I can use the soft stuff to get a really smooth and round surface. I will post some more pics when I do this.

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                  • #10
                    So I sanded a bunch down and came out with the following product. The touchscreen glass that I am trying to put on it does not fit flush. Should I use a piece of wood on the one side of the screen that has the gap?Click image for larger version

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Willn View Post
                      Should I use a piece of wood on the one side of the screen that has the gap?[ATTACH]65620[/ATTACH][ATTACH]65621[/ATTACH][ATTACH]65622[/ATTACH]
                      IMO no. The filler you put in should have evenly extended the topology of the existing bezel to the surface of the monitor you're putting in there. I will put together a couple of 3D images to illustrate what you should do. Tomorrow.

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                      • #12
                        OK, I had another idea. What I did was cover the glass touch screen in foil as per the thread by turbocad and think that everything fits well expect the one side that is curved. At this point, I should be able to just build up that side with some more filler and sand it down, right? Attaching a pic to illustrate...


                        Click image for larger version

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                        • #13
                          Also, since the Dynatron 660 is no longer available and I have already used it on this, what would be a good alternative that would be hard for a good base?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Willn View Post
                            What I did was cover the glass touch screen in foil as per the thread by turbocad and think that everything fits well expect the one side that is curved...
                            Turbocad did not cover the glass in foil. The glass was now where near the bezel during fabrication. 'Cad covered the factory bezel with foil so he could pop out the mold he made.

                            Another oversight, 'Cad taped the inside edge of the monitor bezel to keep it clean and straight, and he built on top of it. The glass attaches to the flat (made for the glass) bezel it cam with.

                            Now you don't have a bezel that came with the glass, so this is why you have to create a FLAT "picture frame" aka bezel that the glass will later be secured to the back of.

                            That picture frame gets attached to the back of the factory plastic bezel you're trying to add material to.

                            once the two pieces are joined, via CA glue, epoxy, whatever,.. you then use the Dynatron or filler of your choosing to create a smooth transition between the inside edge of the "picture frame" and the factory plastic opening.

                            Being that you are adding material to the factory plastic itself, you don't need to put foil on anything. If anything you might tape of the inside edge of the "picture frame" you make in order to keep the edge nice on sharp.

                            Maybe these images will further clarify.

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                            factory bezel

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                            factory bez backside

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                            monitor frame / "pic frame" - make this out of plexi, acrylic, wood, aluminum, whatever

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                            attach frame to backside of factory bezel

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                            attach frame to backside of factory bezel - front view

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                            fill the difference with "filler" in order to create a smooth transition between the factory material and the "pic frame" edge.

                            Not sure how else to describe the process.
                            Last edited by djvillar; 03-23-2012, 10:45 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Ok, I started with the right idea, but looks like I used a flimsy bezel, #1, and then molded it to the dash peice instead of the hard frame. Do you think I can fix what I have by just making the wooden frame for the glass and attaching that to what I have now, or am I going to have to completely start over?

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