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  • Plastic Weld?

    I want to redesign my center console in my car (which is plastic), so I'll be using the sides of it still, and fiberglassin the top of it. How would i combine the two (fiberglass top, to the pre exisiting plastic center console)?

    I heard there is plastic weld, that will combine the two, but I can't find it anywhere in my town. Is there something else?

    Could I just scrape up the plastic on the sides of the console and drill some holes and let the fiberglass stick to that? Or should I try and look harder for some plastic weld stuff?

  • #2
    Epoxy seems to stick better than fiberglass, but if you rough it up well you should be fine. If you will make the pieces separately epoxy would hold them together well. There are some epoxies just made for plastics.
    Fabricator

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    • #3
      you could epoxy some brackets to the plastic to support the new fiberglass
      [COLOR=Navy][SIZE=1][FONT=Comic Sans MS]Tektility

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      • #4
        try this thread http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/show...threadid=34276 it has the weld stuff you are talking about I think.
        [COLOR=Navy][SIZE=1][FONT=Comic Sans MS]Tektility

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Altimat
          Epoxy seems to stick better than fiberglass, but if you rough it up well you should be fine. If you will make the pieces separately epoxy would hold them together well. There are some epoxies just made for plastics.
          Since I can't find the right stuff in my town, I'll make it out of fiberglass, and ruff up the plastic and use some plastic expoxie I found (crazy clue for plastic) and add them all together to join the two. I'll try it out and see how it works out.

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          • #6
            what you need is Weld on #16
            -Jesus- King of Kings Lord of Lords

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            • #7
              I would use some epoxy, and then fiberglass over it
              Car: 2000 Audi A4 Avant 1.8t
              Carputer 2.0: removed. Back to stock.

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              • #8
                I'll get you some weld poxy for $20 plus shipping.....

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                • #9
                  It seems like there aren't many people who know about it, but there are ways to literally weld plastic, and that's what I thought you were referring to at first so the thread caught my eye . If you have access to the right equipment, you could use it to make the structural bonds and just fill in the gaps with some cosmetic stuff later, but in your case it looks like it'll be easier to use epoxy for the structural parts.
                  I'm lucky because my school has some hot air welding equipment, and if I need to use it, I can just bring the parts down to the shop and start doing the work. It's easy to mess up and burn the parts; it took me quite a bit of practice to get the process down, but now I can plastic weld with no problem.
                  can provide some useful information on the plastic welding process if you want to elarn more.
                  Here I'll try to be helpful to the forum: if you live near Troy, NY and you want me to do some plastic welding for you, just let me know and we can set something up! I'll be back in Troy in January and graduating in May, so that's your window of opportunity if you want to take me up on the offer.
                  Old plans out the window because of an accident .
                  Have: M1-ATX, EPIA M10000, 256MB, 60GB 2.5", slim slot load DVD
                  Need: Time, HU integration, ideas for Lilli

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by brrman
                    I would use some epoxy, and then fiberglass over it
                    Epoxy sticks to fiberglass better than fiberglass itself does, but fiberglass does not stick to epoxy very well at all.
                    Fabricator

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                    • #11
                      Ive been practicing simple welds on plastic recently. not sure if it will hold over time, but its strong enough now. Take 2 edges of plasic, 1 soldering iron, thoroughly melt each edge of the plastic, working down the seam and bond them together. Tidy up with a sander and filler. looks smooth, and it certainly seems strong enough, but im not sure how long it will hold.
                      http://www.digital-car.co.uk

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                      • #12
                        That's pretty similar to the process that I'm talking about. The equipment that I use is a hot air gun with a tacking tip at the end. You put compressed air through the gun (~5-10 psi), put electric current through a heating coil, and out comes very hot air. It heats a small piece of metal just outside the nozzle, and you use that to just tack the pieces together. This seems to be what you're doing, but it goes a step farther to get even stronger joints. I use the tack to just hold the pieces in place temporarily.
                        Heat up a length of the joint with the air gun, and heat the tip of a rod of filler material simultaneously. Then you kind of treat the whole thing like a combination of TIG and stick welding: progressively heat the length of the joint while laying filler material into it. The filler will flow right into the cracks with practice. This creates a nice strong joint; the weld will oftentimes be stronger than the surrounding material.
                        Old plans out the window because of an accident .
                        Have: M1-ATX, EPIA M10000, 256MB, 60GB 2.5", slim slot load DVD
                        Need: Time, HU integration, ideas for Lilli

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                        • #13
                          ive been wanting to get one of those machines i have seen them for about 75$ at some discount place. lol
                          1990 Jeep Cherokee
                          2000 VW Golf TDI 4dr
                          2005 VW GTI MKIV - SOLD

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                          • #14
                            If you guys go to tap plastics they have everything you need. The Chemical Weld on #16 plus the squirt bottle
                            -Jesus- King of Kings Lord of Lords

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RPI Geek
                              hot air gun with a tacking tip at the end. You put compressed air through the gun (~5-10 psi), put electric current through a heating coil, and out comes very hot air. It heats a small piece of metal just outside the nozzle, and you use that to just tack the pieces together. This seems to be what you're doing, but it goes a step farther to get even stronger joints. I use the tack to just hold the pieces in place temporarily.
                              Heat up a length of the joint with the air gun, and heat the tip of a rod of filler material simultaneously. Then you kind of treat the whole thing like a combination of TIG and stick welding: progressively heat the length of the joint while laying filler material into it.
                              Do you have any links for one of those?
                              [COLOR=Navy][SIZE=1][FONT=Comic Sans MS]Tektility

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