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Finally started my dash fabrication... need tips on sanding...

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  • Finally started my dash fabrication... need tips on sanding...

    I started off with a double din, i cut my lilliput (poor lilli....) to fit inside...

    I used a tube of 12 epoxy to glue the front end of the screen to my dash. Then i used some bondo glass on the front of the dash to make a little curve so the screen looks moulded in.. I sanded, bondo'd again, sanded, bondo'd again..

    It doesnt seem to be that bad, but i know theres still a lot of work left to do..

    Since it was looking pretty good i added a coat of bondo gold with my finger around the screen, and now im waiting for it to dry.. ill start sanding again tomorrow...

    anyone have any tips on how to make it look as straight as possible? (like, no waves etc?) I dont have many sanding tools but i have a lot of paper (40 grit, 50, 80, 180, 400, 2000 grit) if i just use my fingers to apply pressure, will waves appear?

    Also, around how many hours of sanding should it take? so far I have at least 5 hours of sanding and bondo'ing into this screen... apart from the time to plan everything out and for drying time etc...


    Thanks!

  • #2
    I'd say anywhere from 200 to 250 hours.

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    • #3
      use a sanding block to ensure a flat surface.

      remember, finer grits are ONLY to remove scratches. if you use fine grits on bumps, you dont remove the bumps, you only smooth them.

      so start at 80, if you have to. sand it so its PERFECT at 80 grit. only then go to the finer grits. it goes FAST when you go to the finer grits, just a couple minutes over every surface.

      but itll take days with the 80.

      the block will help you immensly.

      Ive always noticed waves when I sand without the block. always seems to go four times slower WITH the block, but when im finally done, its pretty sweet.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by WhiteRabbit
        use a sanding block to ensure a flat surface.

        remember, finer grits are ONLY to remove scratches. if you use fine grits on bumps, you dont remove the bumps, you only smooth them.

        so start at 80, if you have to. sand it so its PERFECT at 80 grit. only then go to the finer grits. it goes FAST when you go to the finer grits, just a couple minutes over every surface.

        but itll take days with the 80.

        the block will help you immensly.

        Ive always noticed waves when I sand without the block. always seems to go four times slower WITH the block, but when im finally done, its pretty sweet.
        Thanks a lot. Ill see what I can do!

        Comment


        • #5
          Definatly use a sand block. Other way you'll certanly have waves.
          After applying the bondo I use 100 grit to get it to shape, then 150 to smooth it a little, and that's all. Then I apply the primer, sand it with 400, primer again, the paint.
          Don't bother using finer grits before the primer, as (in my case) it only makes it worse.

          Be sure to remove all the imperfections. Pay attention, as if there are small imperfections, after you paint it, they'll magnify themselves.
          Renault Megane...the OEM look

          The Lost in Europe Ford Escort

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          • #6
            If you surface is flat enough, try using a DA sander. I use them daily in shop, I can get 180 Grit on the sander to feel like 1200 grit by hand.

            Bondo, 80 grit Sand, Bondo, 80 Grit, 180 grit to get all the 18 grit scratches out, then primer, wetsand with 400, and then paint.
            Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo
            Kenwood X790 x/ iP500 Ipod Interface
            Elemental Designs 13Kv.2 D2
            CDT ES-620 (omg yayay!!!1)
            NINe.2X, NINe.2

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            • #7
              Originally posted by HHdesign
              If you surface is flat enough, try using a DA sander. I use them daily in shop, I can get 180 Grit on the sander to feel like 1200 grit by

              Those are really good. Unfortunatly they work on a flat even surface...
              Renault Megane...the OEM look

              The Lost in Europe Ford Escort

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ddn
                I'd say anywhere from 200 to 250 hours.
                from the second you grab the saw and the stock panel to the second you rub the polish compound on the final layers of clear, this isnt too bad an estimate.......

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by WhiteRabbit
                  from the second you grab the saw and the stock panel to the second you rub the polish compound on the final layers of clear, this isnt too bad an estimate.......
                  Wow. I'm glad you guys aren't trying to make any money doing this. I wonder how much time the pros spend?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    http://fresnoracing.ipbhost.com/inde...howtopic=18329
                    this is four nights straight of work, give or take (you can read through the thread)

                    http://feandil.tripod.com/finished_pics/index.album?i=5
                    this is claimed 550 hours

                    http://fresnoracing.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=508
                    this one was 600 hours and 23 grand

                    http://www.objext.com/semi/HT/Mains8.JPG
                    these after priming are about 60-100 hours after priming but before paint.

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                    • #11
                      I was joking, but sadly its probably true.

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                      • #12
                        thats mdf work, not fiberglassing.

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                        • #13
                          then it should be less time compared to fiberglass, right? =D

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                          • #14
                            Make every suface flat and every edge sharp until they are all straight and smooth. Then round off the outside odges and fill in the inside edges. I use ends of zip ties to spread filler in my inside edges. Get these perfect they're a ***** to sand. Fingers are way too fat for sharp detail and an OEM look.

                            For blocks I custom make one for almost every surface from a paint stick, and use self-adhesive 80 and 180 file paper on a roll. You can buy these in strips too. I also use those small stainless 6" rulers for getting into corners with sandpaper.
                            Fabricator

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                            • #15
                              I got cheap and put some primer up, hoping it would remove most of the scratches.... it actually turned out pretty good considering what I thought it would turn out to look like......

                              I'll just use 4-5 coats of primer to cover as much as possible and the flat black should cover a bit too (the scratches are almost all in the corners...)

                              Ill post pics soon


                              Thanks to everyone who helped.... its too bad i dont have the patience to spend 600 hours on a small piece like this :P

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