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  • Which Rotary Switch Spins Forever?

    I have a very simple question. Will this rotary type switch be able to spin forever. Like basically, if you just spin the knob, will it ever catch on something. Something that I'll be able to spin indefinately such as for volume control or menu selection. I will be using this in a custom hardware project, but never used anything like this. Any help would be appreciated.

    Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
    1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
    30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
    15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
    Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

  • #2
    Originally posted by 2k1Toaster
    I have a very simple question. Will this rotary type switch be able to spin forever. Like basically, if you just spin the knob, will it ever catch on something. Something that I'll be able to spin indefinately such as for volume control or menu selection. I will be using this in a custom hardware project, but never used anything like this. Any help would be appreciated.

    With a the specs, no one here can tell you. Also, what are you trying to accomplish. If that is a rotary binary encoder, then spining freely may not help you.

    So, what is your application, and a link to specs.

    Michael
    ...I love the French language...especially to curse with...Nom de Dieu de putain de bordel de merde de saloperies de connards d'enculés de ta mère. You see, it's like wiping your *** with silk, I love it.

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    • #3
      I doubt it, but it's possible. I also doubt that a switch like that would "feel" very good, and may be a little flimsy if you tried to attach a big volume knob to it.

      If you don't care about it being "clicky" as it turns, you might be able to get away with using a rotary encoder intended for a motor.

      also, I just found this, which is a small PCB- or panel-mount rotary encoder with 360 degree rotation and 16 counts per revolution:
      http://www.newark.com/NewarkWebComme...3909474&QText=
      But don't take it from me! here's a quote from a real, live newbie:
      Originally posted by Viscouse
      I am learning buttloads just by searching on this forum. I've learned 2 big things so far: 1-it's been done before, and 2-if it hasn't, there is a way to do it.
      eegeek.net

      Comment


      • #4
        Well I am just going to be starting a random summer project, and I will use 2 of these knobs. One will be for navigating menu selection, and the other will be for incremental adjustments. So knob 1 will be selecting from Time/Volume/Other Stuff and the second one will control The hour/minute/second selction, Volume level, and other stuff.

        My idea is very up in the air, and not very solid yet. It is just something to spend money and time on while out of school. I learn best by doing, so I figure why not?!

        As for feeling good, I wanted them to be smooth turning (which this one is obviously not seeing as how there are only 16 spaces), but tactile enough to feel the notches as it turns. Feel would be similar to like a volume control on a standard HU.

        I realize that a freely spinning encoder will be hard to control, but the idea is for a menu to loop back upon itself, and also for the time selector to go from 0 to 60 back to 0 and so on.
        Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
        1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
        30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
        15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
        Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

        Comment


        • #5
          This is the data sheet for that knob. http://jameco.com/wcsstore/Jameco/Pr...dDS/582418.pdf

          Oh, and the regular link is the word this in the first post, incase you missed it!
          Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
          1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
          30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
          15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
          Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

          Comment


          • #6
            Just thought of another example of what I'm trying to explain. On iPods, the touch jog wheel. I dont have an iPod, but I believe it cycles through the menu and you can "spin" your fingers forever. That type of logic. I could use a touchpanel, but a simple knob would work.
            Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
            1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
            30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
            15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
            Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

            Comment


            • #7
              You can take a non-optical mouse apart and hack it and use the rotary encoder. Google search for "Nasty spinner" and you'll probably find more than you need.

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              • #8
                Any rotary encoder spins forever.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by LiquidKernel
                  Any rotary encoder spins forever.
                  I am sure there are some that do not, but MOST due. The problem is gonna be, in your situation, that it is binary encoded. Do you plan on using a PIC or something similar to interperate the turns? I think you want something more like a rotary switch, like from a mouse wheel. Continuous, and just a bunch of "button" presses in essence when you turn the knob.

                  And, by the way, the ipod, while it continues to spin, does not cycle through the menus. it stops at the top and bottom.

                  Michael
                  ...I love the French language...especially to curse with...Nom de Dieu de putain de bordel de merde de saloperies de connards d'enculés de ta mère. You see, it's like wiping your *** with silk, I love it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My opinion, if you want something to spin forever, I'd go with a rotary encoder with detents (little notches that catch it a little bit for some tactile feel and they won't rotate on their own), I'd also get one with the integrated pushbottons. I've got a bunch for my rgb lights, they're pretty easy to read.

                    These are the ones I used.
                    http://www.mouser.com/index.cfm?&han...*&N=0&crc=true
                    GE Cache Builder | [email protected] |Coolstuff :autospeed.com | bit-tech.net | Nitemax Ultra Pinouts

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 2k1Toaster
                      I have a very simple question. Will this rotary type switch be able to spin forever. Like basically, if you just spin the knob, will it ever catch on something. Something that I'll be able to spin indefinately such as for volume control or menu selection. I will be using this in a custom hardware project, but never used anything like this. Any help would be appreciated.

                      Go for the rotary encoder like others are saying. The switch you asked about here is meant for settings that are not frequently changed. Even if it doesn't have stops, if you put a big knob on here and spin it you will probably wear it out in just a few weeks.
                      ~Jimmy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Wiredwrx
                        I am sure there are some that do not, but MOST due.
                        Well I've been pretty unlucky then! All of the ones that I saw at my local electronics store (they just pull parts from everything and sort it into a huge warehouse) spun like a potentiomenter. Can go from the top all the way around but it would stop back at the top. Then you would have to spin the other direction. So 360 degrees of freedom compared with infinate. I guess most of the ones I find online will be the kind I'm looking for.

                        Originally posted by Wiredwrx
                        The problem is gonna be, in your situation, that it is binary encoded. Do you plan on using a PIC or something similar to interperate the turns? I think you want something more like a rotary switch, like from a mouse wheel. Continuous, and just a bunch of "button" presses in essence when you turn the knob.
                        I actually want it to be binary coded. I am going to be desinging a whole circuit. I don't yet have a PIC programmer (If anyone has a spare to sell Serial/USB/PCI make me an offer ) I will probably use one in the end though. I believe my university has them available for me to program a chip. I think....

                        Originally posted by Wiredwrx
                        And, by the way, the ipod, while it continues to spin, does not cycle through the menus. it stops at the top and bottom.
                        Good to know! I've never really played around with them.

                        Originally posted by JimmyFitz
                        Go for the rotary encoder like others are saying. The switch you asked about here is meant for settings that are not frequently changed. Even if it doesn't have stops, if you put a big knob on here and spin it you will probably wear it out in just a few weeks.
                        That's probably true. Like I said, just thinking at this point. Not really even sure of the final project yet! I just want to do this for fun. I know, I'm a geek.

                        Originally posted by shotgunefx
                        My opinion, if you want something to spin forever, I'd go with a rotary encoder with detents (little notches that catch it a little bit for some tactile feel and they won't rotate on their own), I'd also get one with the integrated pushbottons. I've got a bunch for my rgb lights, they're pretty easy to read.

                        These are the ones I used.
                        http://www.mouser.com/index.cfm?&han...*&N=0&crc=true
                        Those look promising. I haven't read the datasheet yet, I'll do that later tonight. Since it says incremental rotary encoder, I guess it just spits out if it is incrementing or decrementing. I guess that because it says 15-20 positions, yet only 3 pins, so maximum 3bits of data, or 8 positions. So this is pretty good. It wouldn't tell me what position it is in, but only whether or not the knob has been rotated and in what direction. That is perfect. The pushbutton option is pretty nifty. Didn't really think of that. I wonder if they make cool ones with LED backlight so it illuminates a ring around the pushbutton? I'll look later.

                        Also, shotgunefx, do you have any pics of those parts in use? Just kind of curious how they look with a knob on them and all.

                        Thankyou everyone for your responses, and I hope it wasn't too dumb a question!
                        Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
                        1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
                        30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
                        15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
                        Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Dude, you need to hack one of these for those kinda knobs...



                          Just kidding, but if you are using two knobs for navigation on a LCD, it would be a cool tablet....
                          ~Puff

                          View my worklog... I dare you... http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=77267

                          Carputer Progress [||------------------] 10%

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Puffanug
                            Dude, you need to hack one of these for those kinda knobs...



                            Just kidding, but if you are using two knobs for navigation on a LCD, it would be a cool tablet....
                            Why didn't I think of that!!! j/k
                            Well, the digital etch-a-sketches that can save pictures to flash and stuff, would have the right part. But I think they stopped making those.

                            ================================================== =================
                            And in case anyone else on this forum one day sees this thread then I will copy some info on rotary encoders here from ubasics.com. I thought they worked this way, but I like having confirmation.
                            Originally posted by www.ubasics.com
                            Generally there are two kind of rotary encoders:
                            One that puts out absolute position, the other puts out relative position, or position change.

                            The absolute position output will vary depending on the resolution and manufacturer. They may use a binary code (also look up references to 'grey code').

                            On a 16 position absolute encoder, with four outputs, the outputs may look like this:

                            OUT 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1
                            OUT 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
                            OUT 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1
                            OUT 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
                            Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

                            The relative position encoder will either put out a sine wave on both wires, with the second being 90 degrees out of phase with the first, or it puts out a square wave on both wires, as follows (You'll need to set the following to fixed width font to see it):

                            ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                            OUT 1 ___| |___| |___| |___| |___| |___
                            ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ _
                            OUT 2 _| |___| |___| |___| |___| |___|
                            <--Clockwise Counter-clockwise-->

                            This square wave is basically a representation of a sine wave, 90 degrees out of phase. It is easy to interface, if you take OUT 1 and define it as your direction. If OUT 1 is high when a pulse starts on OUT 2, then the rotary encoder is going clockwise. If OUT 1 is low when a pulse starts on OUT 2, then the encoder is going counter-clockwise. A sine wave output encoder is good if you want a higher resolution than you can get from a square wave encoder. It would require more hardware or software to interpret, though.
                            Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
                            1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
                            30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
                            15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
                            Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              For the ASCII pictures you need a fixed width font. They look good on the original site. Which btw is: http://www.ubasics.com/adam/electron...rotryenc.shtml
                              Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
                              1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
                              30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
                              15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
                              Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

                              Comment

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