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cutin plexi with table saw

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  • cutin plexi with table saw

    ok, im out to make a new case out of plexi.

    i talked to KaBoom and he used a bandsaw, well i dont have one of them

    but, i do have one of them cheap tablesaws that just have a circular saw bolted to the bottom, cant i just replace the blade with a really small toothed one and use it?

    thanks
    dan

  • #2
    hmmmm, melting plastic, smelly

    Maybe a jigsaw, table saws spin the blade pretty fast, its hard to not burn wood with them.

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    • #3
      yea, ive gone the jigsaw method before= crappy jagged lines, i ended up just melting the edges with a torch to smooth em out.


      arrrgh i love the way the plexi cases look, just wish i had the tools to build one,

      thanks
      dan

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      • #4
        I could be wrong that it would melt. If I had any plexi laying around, I would try and let you know. Now I have cut PCB material and it was fine, I used a fine tooth plywood blade.

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        • #5
          A dremel and a diamond wheel works great, if you have a dremel.
          www.arbybean.com

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          • #6
            ive used my dremel on plexi to no avail, more jagged and melted plastic.

            i just tryed some scrap on the table saw with a drywall blade, and it should do the trick,

            thanks for your suggestions
            dan

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            • #7
              I, Too, am planning on a plexi case--but for my next desktop.

              I came across THIS GUY who has some tips for making a plexicase.

              He says that you can use a fine-tooth circular saw if you go REALLY slow.
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              • #8
                Plexi or acrylic I have.. (not using for this project though)
                is not that thick.

                But I usually score it 2 or 3 times with a really sharp knife.
                lay it on a table with the score (line) just over the edge and snap (with a quick push or pull) the other piece of.. (put a book or something else on it so that presssure is constant.. and not on 2 places when you're pushing with your hand only)

                et. voila..

                perfectly clean edges.

                Greez,
                Raas - The Netherlands
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                • #9
                  Have a local plastic shop do it. It will only cost a few dollars, and the cuts will be perfect.
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                  • #10
                    local plastic shop? what do you mean a sign shop?

                    dan

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                    • #11
                      I also did all of my cuts with a dremel...dont plan on being able to do it perfect...I drew the lines first with a dry erase marker...Then I took a diamond cutting wheel and cut the lines a lil' bit farther away then they needed to be, and finally followed up with a piece of sand paper to get them nice and straight. it works pretty well, but a laser cutter is really a dream come true

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                      • #12
                        The table saw will work, if you are carefull. Take the blade and turn it backwards. I know, it sounds crazy but it works. The problem is that a normally cutting blade tries to grab the plexi and drag the blade through it, creating stress points and cracks and all that ****e. Turning the blade around will melt the plastic away in a nice uniform clean fashon. Try a small test piece to prove it to yourself.
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                        • #13
                          Yellow Pages -> Plastic

                          Most cities have several places that deal in plexiglass/lexan/etc. Sometimes sign shops will do it, sometimes not.
                          Player: Pentium 166MMX, Amptron 598LMR MB w/onboard Sound, Video, LAN, 10.2 Gig Fujitsu Laptop HD, Arise 865 DC-DC Converter, Lexan Case, Custom Software w/Voice Interface, MS Access Based Playlists
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                          • #14
                            If you're making straight cuts, you can use a jigsaw - just clamp a piece of wood - 2x4 or something like that to the plexi you're cutting....what I mean is take your plexi, measure and draw your cutting line. take your jigsaw and put it on the line so the blade is on the line - then take your piece of wood - make sure it's a factory edge or a straight edge you cut on a table saw or the like - put it next to the guide on the jigsaw and clamp it to the plexi...do the same on the other end and recheck the first end....then you'll be good to go - a perfectly straight line. I use a Bosch variable speed jigsaw, which seems to work well as I can change the speed if the blade is melting and not cutting the plexi.

                            I hope this helps...I don't think I described the method well, but I think it can be understood, no?

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                            • #15
                              I used a tablesaw for my plexi case and it worked absolutley fine. No cracks, edges were smooth. I didn't flip the blade backwards or do anything special.

                              Tablesaw will be fine if your cutting thick plexi, I would be hesitant to use 1/8" or less in the tablesaw. Anything over an 1/8" should be fine. When you cut make sure you take into account the thickness of the blade, the blade will eat about 1/8" up. So if you want a 9" piece, measure it to 9 1/8" to the farside of the blade or make sure you are at 9" on the near side of the blade.

                              I also recommend getting the plexi glass that has the paper protective covering, the thin plastic covering doesn't protect from scratches that well.
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