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Where can I get a 4ga fuse block

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  • Where can I get a 4ga fuse block

    Hey guys where are all of your getting your 4ga splitter that has the fuse feature built into it? I thought Advanced auto would have something like that but they don't.

  • #2
    Originally posted by mdawg View Post
    Hey guys where are all of your getting your 4ga splitter that has the fuse feature built into it? I thought Advanced auto would have something like that but they don't.
    Try a car stereo shop.
    If you're willing to go with an online vendor, try one of these links:
    http://www.hifisoundconnection.com/S...FQyI1QodqF0VQw
    http://www.darvex.com/miva/merchant....egory_Code=FDB
    http://www.crutchfield.com/g_715/Pow...e.html?tp=3001
    Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
    How about the Wiki?



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    • #3
      Curious how important are the brands of these. Will any one of them work cause If so I kinda like the digital ones for show and power draw which are cheap on ebay http://search.ebay.com/search/search...ock&category0=

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      • #4
        Can't say. I have a Streetwires distro block that does both power & ground. I've never used a no-name brand, so I can't say.
        Considering you're talking about your vehicle's electrical system and the risk of a short & fire in your vehicle, is it something you're willing to gamble on to save $15 or whatever?
        Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
        How about the Wiki?



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        • #5
          bump?

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          • #6
            one thing for sure, it would drain your battery faster than the standard distro block

            Also, I use knukonceptz cable, distro block (non digital one) and some other stuff they have. So far I am pleased with it.
            dsatx in voompc 2 case <HERE>

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DarquePervert View Post
              Can't say. I have a Streetwires distro block that does both power & ground. I've never used a no-name brand, so I can't say.
              Considering you're talking about your vehicle's electrical system and the risk of a short & fire in your vehicle, is it something you're willing to gamble on to save $15 or whatever?
              How is a distro block going to cause a short or a fire? It's a block of metal. Just keep the positive block/terminals away from the grounds and it will be fine, no matter what brand is used.

              I would also like to comment on the fuse. Make sure that you aren't substituting the fuse by the battery for a fuse in the distro block. Your positive lead should still have a fuse within 18 inches of the battery.
              Carputer progress meter: [-----|]
              Carputer gadget meter: [--|---]

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              • #8
                And it will be...here is a pic I drew up of what it will look like and I also had another question which I added in the picture.
                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  How is a distro block going to cause a short or a fire? It's a block of metal. Just keep the positive block/terminals away from the grounds and it will be fine, no matter what brand is used.
                  Construction quality would affect the ability of the fuse block to keep the positive terminals away from the gound. You don't want something so cheap it could break and short out.

                  Or it could get hot and melt or possibly cause a fire. You don't need massive amounts of current to do that. A bad contact in there (e.g. fuse to fuse holder) can get hot. 40A with a 1V drop is 40W. Think how hot a 40W lightbulb gets.

                  If there is a bunch of extra circuitry inside, like the examples in the link with displays in them, how well is that made for such a low price?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by The Grinch View Post
                    How is a distro block going to cause a short or a fire? It's a block of metal. Just keep the positive block/terminals away from the grounds and it will be fine, no matter what brand is used.
                    If a distro block is poorly manufactured, it could create a short. The addition of distro for both power & ground increases the possibility of a short. So does the additional electronics required to display foltave and/or amperage, as Alanh pointed out.
                    Yes, I fully realize it's an extremely unlikely scenario.
                    However, people thought that lead paint on children's toys made in China was an extremely unlikely scenario, too.

                    There are some brands that have stringent manufacturing quality standards. There are other brands that don't care as much.

                    Would you be willing to risk the safety of your ride to some brand you (or anyone else in the car audio hobby, for that matter) has never heard of or dealt with?

                    For the additional $10, the peace of mind I would receive from purchasing a known reliable brand is well worth it to me.

                    Originally posted by mdawg View Post
                    And it will be...here is a pic I drew up of what it will look like and I also had another question which I added in the picture.
                    For future reference, it's A LOT easier to add the question in a post rather than the image.
                    And you didn't really ask a question in your pic.
                    But your diagram and logic is correct. You would use an ignition-switched line to trigger the relay, which would be between the distro block & the inverter. That would power on the inverter when you turn the key on, which is what I believe you ultimately want.
                    Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
                    How about the Wiki?



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                    • #11
                      It has more to do with buying the right part for the project rather than buying something based on brand name or price. If you buy something rated for 60A, and you only draw 40A, then you are fine. If you buy something rated for 40A, drop in an 80A fuse and start drawing 50A constantly, you're asking for trouble.

                      It's the same story with a subwoofers. I've seen posts on other boards of people asking why their sub isn't working, and wanting to know if it could be the amplifier. After a few question you find out that they are pushing 1200 watts RMS into a sub rated for 600watts peek.

                      It's all about common sense. Use the right part for the job and you'll be fine. I wouldn't bother with the Digital stuff unless you really like bling. In the end it's just something else to go wrong. I would also avoid distro blocks that are positive and negative combos. Combining the two in one enclosure is just asking for trouble in my opinion.
                      Carputer progress meter: [-----|]
                      Carputer gadget meter: [--|---]

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DarquePervert View Post

                        For future reference, it's A LOT easier to add the question in a post rather than the image.
                        And you didn't really ask a question in your pic.
                        But your diagram and logic is correct. You would use an ignition-switched line to trigger the relay, which would be between the distro block & the inverter. That would power on the inverter when you turn the key on, which is what I believe you ultimately want.
                        Yup thats what I was wondering, the only thing that I had a problem about was does it hurt going from a 4GA wire to that small relay and back into 4GA again?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mdawg View Post
                          Yup thats what I was wondering, the only thing that I had a problem about was does it hurt going from a 4GA wire to that small relay and back into 4GA again?
                          Relays are rated for amperage, just like fuses. As long as the current draw is not more than the rating for the relay, you will be fine.
                          Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
                          How about the Wiki?



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