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How much power used in 'Sleep' mode?

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  • How much power used in 'Sleep' mode?

    I have a 4 port hub, and probably 7 USB devices in total...
    Am I gonna kill my battery quick if I use Vista Sleep (suspend to RAM)?
    My hibernate isn't working properly...

  • #2
    i would guess you will still be drawing about an 1 amp min of power in sleep mode.. might be only half that..
    which is about 12W so think if you left your inside cabin lights on how long would the battery last.

    short term should be fine, but just remember if you lose power or something you may corrupt windows or generate issues with open files.

    assuming you are using this in a car..
    and why vista.. why not XP?

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    • #3
      With XP you can use the embedded tools (EWF) to prevent corruption of files and use HORM. Check out the software forums.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by WuNgUn View Post
        I have a 4 port hub, and probably 7 USB devices in total...
        Am I gonna kill my battery quick if I use Vista Sleep (suspend to RAM)?
        My hibernate isn't working properly...
        mainly depends on the sleep mode! what is your mobo type? for exaple, D201xxx goes only to S2, not S3, and its wattage nearly the same than on desktop...
        "case": Skoda Superb Elegance 1.8T
        Asrock G41MH-GE, E2180 2GHz dualcore, 1024MB DDR2/800, Samsung F1 750GB/7200RPM/32MB, M4-ATX, Lilliput FA1011 HDMI touchscreen, ASUS Xonar DG PCI, homemade Quectel L10 USB GPS

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        • #5
          I remember reading an article about this.
          In S3, it takes 5w to keep the RAM and motherboard alive.
          Providing all USB devices are not powered during S3.

          I've not heard of S4 Hibernation not working on any motherboard by the way.

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          • #6
            My carpc in S3 take 160mA(2,24W) with UMTS modem and GPS turned on...

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            • #7
              It varies dramatically between different components. The only measurement I recall was an old nforce2 board that weighed in at 900mA at 5v, which is probably more like 500mA at 12v after linear regulator losses. Using a more efficient buck converter would reduce that, but using a full dc-dc psu might increase it. The point is, you really need to measure your own setup if you want to know what it draws.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by numbers View Post
                It varies dramatically between different components. The only measurement I recall was an old nforce2 board that weighed in at 900mA at 5v, which is probably more like 500mA at 12v after liner regulator losses. Using a more efficient buck converter would reduce that, but using a full dc-dc psu might increase it. The point is, you really need to measure your own setup if you want to know what it draws.
                Ummm...how do I measure current draw with my multimeter?

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                • #9
                  Set it to measure current/amps/A/mA/whatever it's labeled on your meter. This will also require putting the positive probe in a different jack on most meters. If your meter doesn't have such a function, one of acceptable quality can be had for under $20. Disconnect either the positive or negative wire (which ever is easier) leading to your power supply and bridge the gap with the multimeter. That is to say - one probe on the wire you just disconnected, and one probe where you just disconnect that wire from.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by numbers View Post
                    Set it to measure current/amps/A/mA/whatever it's labeled on your meter. This will also require putting the positive probe in a different jack on most meters. If your meter doesn't have such a function, one of acceptable quality can be had for under $20. Disconnect either the positive or negative wire (which ever is easier) leading to your power supply and bridge the gap with the multimeter. That is to say - one probe on the wire you just disconnected, and one probe where you just disconnect that wire from.
                    That's what I thought...thanks

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