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  • hdd endurance

    I'm installing a laptop and was wondering...will the hdd survive the bumpy roads and the "moving" environment??
    laptop based e46 carpc

  • #2
    Laptop hard drives are a lot more durable that desktop drives. If you search around these forums you will find mixed experiences of the durability of hard drives. Ive read some people that say they go through drives constantly and some that go 4x4ing all the time and never have an issue. For the most part if you have decent laptop HD and you give it some sort of anti-vibration mounting it should last for a while unless you like to hit pot holes often.

    If your really concerned about it then I would recommend investing in a Solid State Drive. They are quite pricey but very effective.

    If you don't want to spend that money just back up your setting and use you laptop as is and if it does die you can then decide what to do and you'll have it all saved

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    • #3
      another option are rudgized hard drives. Western Digital and a number of other manufactures make them for the military.

      Personally, I've been running desktop hard drives for years with a vertical mount. The only time I've had an issue is when a dropped a drive when taking it out of the car.
      Alex
      90 300zx twinturbo conversion
      Epia C3, 512 ram, syntax mobo, 80 gig WD, Mediacar, GPS w/Routis, all behind drivers seat, 7in Lcd Lilliput VGA with Touch, wireless adapter for stumbling, Consult ODB1 adapter and data scanner.

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      • #4
        i'm planning to put an acer aspire, 3680 i think...

        it's a decent, mid budget laptop...

        i'll see, if it disappoints me, i will replace it with a eee pc...

        tnx for the reply

        edit:

        is the hdd position standarded, how shoul i turn it?(hdd vertical mount)
        laptop based e46 carpc

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        • #5
          Again there is much debate over the vertical vs horizontal mounting... the theory behind mounting it vertically is that when you hit a bump there is less chance of the head hitting the surface of the disk. There is about 0.003" between the head and surface and if the head hits the surface its ruined. I have my mounted vertically just because thats how it fitted where I wanted it.

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          • #6
            Hard drive orientation in the car environment

            Also, covered in the FAQs (seventh item under "Car PC General"): http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/advfaq.php
            Originally posted by ghettocruzer
            I was gung ho on building a PC [until] just recently. However, between my new phone having internet and GPS and all...and this kit...Im starting to have trouble justfiying it haha.
            Want to:
            -Find out about the new iBug iPad install?
            -Find out about carPC's in just 5 minutes? View the Car PC 101 video

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            • #7
              Since the hard drive is mounted inside the laptop and there isnt much that you can do to change that other than use an external drive, i would recommend that you mount the entire laptop with some sort of vibration or shock resistant mounting. Look around the forums for ideas of how to this. Everything has been done from suspending items in rubber bands / chords, to using an anti-vibration mounts that are used on for automotive ignition boxes in racing applications.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bratnetwork View Post
                Since the hard drive is mounted inside the laptop and there isnt much that you can do to change that other than use an external drive, i would recommend that you mount the entire laptop with some sort of vibration or shock resistant mounting. Look around the forums for ideas of how to this. Everything has been done from suspending items in rubber bands / chords, to using an anti-vibration mounts that are used on for automotive ignition boxes in racing applications.
                I would not endorse this method. It can introduce more motion than a firm fixed mounting method.
                Your cars suspension will be just fine. Do not let the hardware bounce inside the car.
                TruckinMP3
                D201GLY2, DC-DC power, 3.5 inch SATA

                Yes, you should search... and Yes, It has been covered before!

                Read the FAQ!

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                • #9
                  I use the anti-vibration mounts from an MSD ignition box. They are still a nice sturdy mount that doesn't allow things to bounce around. Basically its just a piece of rubber with a stud coming out of both ends. It hold things in place but just absorbs some of the vibrations that the car experiences. Won't do much for pot holes or bumps in the road.

                  http://www.jegs.com/i/MSD/121/8823/10002/-1

                  I personally don't like the rubber band method either, I was just examples of what some other members have implemented.

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                  • #10
                    i'm thinking of making some kind of "walls" made of wood and a piece of spunge at the bottom...putting the laptop verticaly but with plenty of room besides the laptop and the walls
                    laptop based e46 carpc

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                    • #11
                      Something like that could be useful... But you have to watch out for over heating. If that is the route you would like to go then make sure its well ventilated. Look through the Show Of Your Project thread and also the Worklogs thread under that and see what others with laptop have been doing. Also ask them questions about how it worked out for them and all, bc I have not used a laptop in my car as a CarPC.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bratnetwork View Post
                        I use the anti-vibration mounts from an MSD ignition box. They are still a nice sturdy mount that doesn't allow things to bounce around. Basically its just a piece of rubber with a stud coming out of both ends. It hold things in place but just absorbs some of the vibrations that the car experiences. Won't do much for pot holes or bumps in the road.

                        http://www.jegs.com/i/MSD/121/8823/10002/-1

                        I personally don't like the rubber band method either, I was just examples of what some other members have implemented.
                        Do you have any proof it helps?
                        I can say with certainty the firm mount with no shock or vibration works.
                        Multiple installs (6+) and more than one frame bending car wreck with no hardware issues. This is experiance across 12+ years of car computing. (yes, I am an old fart)

                        The one time I thought I had a mounting issue turned out to be a wire that was not seated correctly. This caused reboots over some bumps.
                        TruckinMP3
                        D201GLY2, DC-DC power, 3.5 inch SATA

                        Yes, you should search... and Yes, It has been covered before!

                        Read the FAQ!

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                        • #13
                          No i can't say that I can prove that it helps at all... Neither can I prove that it had a negative effect...

                          I'm not saying that solid mounting does work... I was just replying to his thread asking about hard drive endurance and options of what he can do if he is concerned about it. If someone wants to take extra steps to try to protect their gear I'm going to tell them not to unless its been proven to have a negative effect. I was just offering him ideas to consider if he wanted to do something.

                          We all know this is an ongoing debate throughout this whole website and the CarPC world and I'm not saying anyone is right or wrong about it. People have had mixed outcomes with many different mounting methods.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bratnetwork View Post
                            No i can't say that I can prove that it helps at all... Neither can I prove that it had a negative effect...

                            I'm not saying that solid mounting does work... I was just replying to his thread asking about hard drive endurance and options of what he can do if he is concerned about it. If someone wants to take extra steps to try to protect their gear I'm going to tell them not to unless its been proven to have a negative effect. I was just offering him ideas to consider if he wanted to do something.

                            We all know this is an ongoing debate throughout this whole website and the CarPC world and I'm not saying anyone is right or wrong about it. People have had mixed outcomes with many different mounting methods.
                            Easy... That was not meant to push your buttons. I have been part of many of the mounting discussions here.

                            I was hoping for proof one way or the other. I have been told that the rubber band method did actually have failures, but as the party with the failed drive was not able to determine the root cause, it is not proof either.

                            Cheers
                            TruckinMP3
                            D201GLY2, DC-DC power, 3.5 inch SATA

                            Yes, you should search... and Yes, It has been covered before!

                            Read the FAQ!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The mp3Car store has a Seagate EE25.2 hard drive. From the Seagate literature, they're designed for automotive environments with good shock and vib specs plus a wide temperature range. I'm not sure which one the store has, but the most rugged version operates over -30C to +85C (-22F to +185F). They're going to cost more than a typical laptop drive though and 80GB is the largest one listed in the Seagate literature.

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