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  • mounting hard drive

    simple question not realy answered. In a car invironment what is the way most are mounting their hard drive? I built my own case that fits in a dual din opening where the original cd player was. now looking to mount the hard drive. whats some of the better ways to mount it. I was thinking rubber grommets in the top or the side of the case, screws with washers goin through the case and grommets and into the hard drive. Or possibly a seperate sort of platform the hard drive sits on with long bolts with springs on both sides, washers and locknuts.
    im open for options. just never seen or rear an answer to this question.

  • #2
    edit: i need to try quiting my spoonfeeding problem...

    try searching for "hard drive mounting"
    My OLD 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT:
    "The Project That Never Ended, until it did"


    next project? subaru brz
    carpc undecided

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    • #3
      sry, i didn't search. ill go with the rubber grommets in the case with the hard drive on one side and the screws with washers through the grommets. some vibration protection but no springyness.
      just tryin to get this thing together and in the dash

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      • #4
        Onya Soundman!
        I loved the "simple question not realy answered" followed by "sry, i didn't search".

        If only more understood that a question is a question and is probably asked because you don't know and have never tried (rather than suggest others have failed in their answers).

        Slociviccoupe - with apologies - please do NOT take this personally (you have too many good posts for that!!!) but rather as MY opportunity to state the obvious IMO.

        So many ask instead of search when a search is not only less typing, but far quicker, and possibly with more options. (If confusing and contradictory, maybe then ask with references etc.)

        Meanwhile others keep replying with the same old info which defeats the purpose of the
        net & forums. (IE - it's apparent purpose as an info source. It's real purpose is to absorb time and distract; grow exponentially; and hopefully de-educate many in the process.)
        And those people should know to link to existing explanations... (and improve on them)...


        BTW - you do NOT want springiness - that leads to early failure. You want "shock absorbtion".
        Sprung components in the electronics industry led to failures. [That's where people recommended loops in resistors, diode & other component leads to "absorb vibration". LOL! It just cause fatigue and breakage. Strange that "experience experts" could be so wrong (LOL). ]

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        • #5
          Originally posted by OldSpark View Post
          BTW - you do NOT want springiness - that leads to early failure. You want "shock absorbtion".
          Sprung components in the electronics industry led to failures. [That's where people recommended loops in resistors, diode & other component leads to "absorb vibration". LOL! It just cause fatigue and breakage. Strange that "experience experts" could be so wrong (LOL).
          i am missing this-- many of the threads go exactly along this line of thinking-- mount the hdd solidly to prevent problems sometimes caused by the vibration in the anti-vibration material..

          and the old used point to debunk all theories(on mounting styles, and platter vibration):

          one member(never can remember the name) has used a 3.5" drive that has survived multiple car-totaling crashes with the drive solidly mounted to the vehicle...
          My OLD 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT:
          "The Project That Never Ended, until it did"


          next project? subaru brz
          carpc undecided

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by soundman98 View Post
            i am missing this...
            Meaning you don't get the point? (Despite knowing the advice and results in favor of rigidity?)
            Bit otherwise, FWIW for others.....

            Reality counts for a lot. EG - if testing indicates good/better reliability when rigidly mounted - DESPITE what common sense or you or people think - then it's likely to be the right solution. [ IE - I often find most people giving the wrong advice or reasoning. Specialist forums like this are an (oh so pleasant) exception, and I'll tend to correct errors or ambiguities that I see - eg, earlier today re caps & bigger batteries being an EXTRA load on alternators etc. ]

            But Reality is dependent.... If it wasn't for the amazing specs of HDDs (eg 200G shock impact or vibration - that's 200 G-forces - albeit maybe for small movements!), then we would probably have to soft-mount them.

            Usually car impacts are soft too - the suspension absorbs the hard edges. (As do wheel rims in extreme situations - but enough of my other week.....)


            As to my view on the situation.... Firstly:

            The electronic component example is almost intuitive. Mount a resistor horizontally with its leads L-bent to the PCB. It is rigid. It may break under extreme shock. Real extreme!
            But put a loop on each end, if that then does "absorb" shock, it must be springy. So imagine the loop as a spring...
            A shock causes the resistor to bounce up & down until damping puts it to rest (air resistance; wire stiffness). Bouncing means the resistor's leads are bending.
            And what happens to metal that continually bends? (Or vibrates.)
            It fatigues and breaks!
            Ergo, almost imminent failure as opposed to rare -if ever- failures for rigid mounting.


            Secondly:
            Picture a car suspension. It is a spring and a damper (shock absorber). They work together.
            The spring is there to absorb shock.
            The damper is there to stop continued bouncing.
            Most regulations etc require vehicles to have (eg) a bounce and a half. That is regarded as not too stiff, but not too much bounce to be dangerous.

            Dare I say that if electronic components had damping, their loops might not have been a failure?
            [ FYI - component-lead loops today are usually for extra cooling. And for "shock absorbtion", AFAIK a mere kink is placed in the lead (a small V-bend), but I might be wrong on that - usually conformal coatings or glues, foams or silicons are used. ]


            In the case of an HDD, I can see that it may not like continued big bouncing even though soft - the head or bearings etc are getting continual +ve & -ve G forces.
            It may prefer the single harder bump that it can tolerate.


            Finally, different materials have different dampenings. One foam or rubber may almost be springy whilst another is more rigid - eg, after compression is released, it slowly returns to its former position.
            In the car case, increase the spring strength and you likewise need to increase the shock-absorber's rating. You might do that for added weight, or better handling, ... whatever. (I used to have overrated shockers for standard springs, but that was for dirt rallying where I wanted more "bump".)


            Hmmm - was that worth it?

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