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  • DC/DC ATX PSUs?

    Hello,

    Just checking in to see if anyone has a good source for 12V ATX power supplys. I am looking for the smallest possible (i know some people in this forum had designed their own). Also, anyone know the cheapest place to get a full sized (PS2) DC/DC ATX PSU? With softon and softoff?

    Let me know.

    Shawn

  • #2
    ATX DC-DC power supplies are the holy grail. Like you said, some have tried to make their own, others have tried the "astec laptop power supply" from www.mpja.com
    Search the forum to find more posts on this subject

    ------------------
    Plans & Pics of my system at http://wizardpc.terrashare.com
    Debt as of 1/1/05: $34,354.48
    Debt as of July 4, 2007: $0.00 explanation
    I'M DEBT FREE!!
    I'm now a reasonably successful gunblogger.

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    • #3
      Thanks alot WizardPC, however, i dont think that will work as an ATX PSU with soft-on and soft-off, im sure it could be used for AT use though. I found the keyspan DC/DC ATX PSU to be readily available. Its rather expensive, but it should do the trick. I just wish there was a smaller unit.

      Shawn

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      • #4
        from what i understand, they are ATX
        Debt as of 1/1/05: $34,354.48
        Debt as of July 4, 2007: $0.00 explanation
        I'M DEBT FREE!!
        I'm now a reasonably successful gunblogger.

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        • #5
          From what I know, an ATX power supply puts out 3.3V DC, the Astec supply does not so it is not an ATX power supply.

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          • #6
            try this: www.keypower.com/DC_power/DX-250H.htm . You could dissasemble the unit and reduce the size that it takes up. You will need to pay attention to cooling though. Hmmm, maybe because it is doing DC-DC and more efficient than standard PC Power supplies, it runs cool enough to not need external cooling (FAN).

            When they get more in stock, I will recieve one. I ordered one in November from the US/California office, and they weren't expecting any until Jan or Feb. I can wait...maybe.
            A carputer?!? What in the hell is that?

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            • #7
              how much are those PSU's? I couldnt find prices.
              Debt as of 1/1/05: $34,354.48
              Debt as of July 4, 2007: $0.00 explanation
              I'M DEBT FREE!!
              I'm now a reasonably successful gunblogger.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hey All. Ya thanks, I called keypower earlier when I made that post, to wizard - the power supplys are $165 US. I asked if they were in stock and readily avialable when they needed them and the sales rep said yes, I could have one by the end of the week. So scooby, give em a call and see whats going on.

                Shawn

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                • #9
                  http://www.quantumpower.com/dc.htm

                  It's pretty nice, allthough when I called for price a while ago i remember it being very expensive. ~$200

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                  • #10
                    Nope, it will most likely need a fan, regardless of how efficient it may be... Also, most desktop ATX PSU's have a PCB inside that is almost the same size as the box; there's not a whole lot you can do size reduction-wise.

                    Remember, a standard 120/220VAC ATX PSU is really a DC-DC PSU, but with a much higher input voltage than a 12VDC unit. The incoming AC is rectified and filtered to DC at a potential of several hundred volts.

                    Part of the reason why you cannot readily purchase an ATX PSU in miniature form is the fact that the Intel guidelines for ATX require certain cooling, space, and current requirements. A custom-designed PSU can get away from this, but in order to be true "ATX" certified, it needs to meet certain criteria. Not a lot of computer companies see the need to manufacture subminiature versions of their supplies, and even then they usually are very specific (for example some book PC's have only high current +12V and +5V outputs and the rest of the PSU is actually built in to the motherboard.)

                    Also, the laptop PSU's people are buying from such sources as MECI and MPJA are *NOT* ATX compatible in that they lack the +3.3V output and PS_ON lead that the ATX specification requires. Also, the current output on the +5V and +12V on these units is fairly weak -- it may have trouble electrically and thermally powering higher speed processors, especially those made by AMD which are notorious for high current requirements.

                    Jason Johnson
                    Yorba Linda, California
                    http://www.m2pc.com

                    MPC Phase IV - *** PENDING ***

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                    • #11
                      The smallest ATX PSU I've found (which I'm going to use in my install... yep, inverter!!!) is an E-Machine PSU. They're not bad, and about half the size of a regular ATX PSU. they only produce 150W of power though... which is WAY more than I'll need... but some people might need more (especially those running AMD processors).

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                      • #12
                        I got a suply from keypower - it was kinda pricy, but now my system runs great ! no noise, no static on my lcd display.

                        I just called Keypower, got really mad and angry sounding, and told them I had been waiting for months, and I only needed 1,
                        and it worked , they called me bck in 10 minutes and said it would ship that day

                        [This message has been edited by gizmomkr (edited 01-11-2001).]
                        Gizmo-
                        Techonlogy on Wheels
                        http://www.hjnetworks.com/car

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