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Help! Dead Monitor

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  • Help! Dead Monitor

    I was driving up the 5 this weekend and the car had been on for like 4 hours. The 5.6 LCD I have installed then quickly faded out to black and hasn't turned on since. Anyone have any ideas as to what happened? I haven't had time to open it up.

  • #2
    Uh, you blew a fuse?

    ------------------
    http://www.geocities.com/mr_bubba_zanetti/
    current projects

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    • #3
      If the LCD was hooked to the car power, ( AkA not the 12v out of the computer PSU) the car, after runing for that long , could have been sending to much power through the electrical system ( alternator ->charging circuit) and could have blown an internal fuse in the lcd, or maby even the voltage reg chip in the lcd.

      Crack it open and look for fuses, cracked/burnt chips.

      The alternator circuit typicaly puts out 14vDC, but its possible it went a bit higher for an extended period of time , and blew the LCD. I highly recomend a good 12V regulator for your sensitive electronic equipment in the car. Remember your car throws back some nasty voltage uppon start up. And the bigest difference between your car and your house - your house has a big metal pipe going into the ground, your car has no real ground. Note *The computer PSU has regulators in it.

      [This message has been edited by gizmomkr (edited 01-16-2001).]
      Gizmo-
      Techonlogy on Wheels
      http://www.hjnetworks.com/car

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      • #4
        Had the chance to open her up. Found a blown capacitor. Interesting.

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        • #5
          Damn. Replaced the cap and still nothing. No other parts are visibly damaged. Any ideas?

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          • #6
            No voltage to Backlight either.

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            • #7
              There is a reason the capacitor blew, when you find that, you will have the answer.

              I suspect a short somehow. (like the board touched some metal on your dash)

              Modern electronics usually doesn't just fail, but is possible a voltage regulator on the board failed and sent juice through the system, and the capacitor absorbed it.

              If you can, trace the route the power takes, and find the voltage regulator (or trace back from the blown capacitor)

              Good luck because...

              I had a fairly expensive home stereo receiver that died one day. I took it in, and they (after about 3 months of checking) figured that either lightning hit the equipment or a tremendous power spike came through the home wiring. Every board had damage, and it cost the same to fix it or buy a new one...it is in the trash somewhere now.

              ------------------
              http://www.geocities.com/mr_bubba_zanetti/
              current projects

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              • #8
                The only voltage reg on the board seems to be working fine. The cap. was part of the power supply for the backlight. looks like it consists of a few logic elements and a transformer otherwise. Could the transformer be bad?

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                • #9
                  Remember that the electrical system in a car is very dirty. There are sags, surges, spikes and a lot of RFI. This is the reason voltage regulators are needed. The voltage may swing from 8V to 25V, with 1000V spikes common. Most likely, that poor little capacitor just had enough and blew. In all likelyhood the same surge that took out the capacitor probably blew the LCD controller. Or, you have a fuseable resistor somewhere that blew.

                  ------------------
                  Aaron Cake
                  London, Ontario, Canada

                  Player: Cyrix 200, 32MB RAM, 10.2Gig Quantum HD, Onboard EtherNet/Sound/Video, Custom Lexan Case, Arise DC-DC, Win95 Kernal w/Custom Player
                  Car: '86 Mazda RX-7 w/Basic Performance Upgrades
                  Player: Pentium 166MMX, Amptron 598LMR MB w/onboard Sound, Video, LAN, 10.2 Gig Fujitsu Laptop HD, Arise 865 DC-DC Converter, Lexan Case, Custom Software w/Voice Interface, MS Access Based Playlists
                  Car: 1986 Mazda RX-7 Turbo (highly modded), 1978 RX-7 Beater (Dead, parting out), 2001 Honda Insight
                  "If one more body-kitted, cut-spring-lowered, farty-exhausted Civic revs on me at an intersection, I swear I'm going to get out of my car and cram their ridiculous double-decker aluminium wing firmly up their rump."

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                  • #10
                    This could be true, but I won't know until I can get the backlight working. I'll have to take the little guy into the EE lab tomorrow. What voltage does the backlight use? -12?

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                    • #11
                      The backlight will run on 12V externally, but will have a small inverter to step it up to 150 or 300V at very low current.

                      ------------------
                      Aaron Cake
                      London, Ontario, Canada

                      Player: Cyrix 200, 32MB RAM, 10.2Gig Quantum HD, Onboard EtherNet/Sound/Video, Custom Lexan Case, Arise DC-DC, Win95 Kernal w/Custom Player
                      Car: '86 Mazda RX-7 w/Basic Performance Upgrades
                      Player: Pentium 166MMX, Amptron 598LMR MB w/onboard Sound, Video, LAN, 10.2 Gig Fujitsu Laptop HD, Arise 865 DC-DC Converter, Lexan Case, Custom Software w/Voice Interface, MS Access Based Playlists
                      Car: 1986 Mazda RX-7 Turbo (highly modded), 1978 RX-7 Beater (Dead, parting out), 2001 Honda Insight
                      "If one more body-kitted, cut-spring-lowered, farty-exhausted Civic revs on me at an intersection, I swear I'm going to get out of my car and cram their ridiculous double-decker aluminium wing firmly up their rump."

                      Comment

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