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  • Is sata good for carpc?

    Hi
    I have just purchased an sp1300 and am just choosing a 2.5" drive,

    Will using a sata drive give any improvement?
    Tweeked Purple Nissan 200SX

  • #2
    SATA will give you improved airflow because you won't have a bulky 80pin cable sticking out of the HD.
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    • #3
      Thanx

      but will it boot faster or improve my file upload speed?
      I think 2.5" IDE drives are ATA100
      Tweeked Purple Nissan 200SX

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      • #4
        In theory the SATA 150 interface would be faster that an ATA-100 interface for transferring data, however drive rotation speed becomes the limiting factor, and I think 2.5" drives are currently maxed out at 5400 rpm, instead of the 7200 speeds that are typical in a 3.5" drive
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        • #5
          Originally posted by turbosx
          but will it boot faster or improve my file upload speed?
          I think 2.5" IDE drives are ATA100
          No speed difference. Drives don't even fill the ATA/100 spec, not to mention coming anywere close to the SATA 150 spec.
          Originally posted by DaveDog
          In theory the SATA 150 interface would be faster that an ATA-100 interface for transferring data, however drive rotation speed becomes the limiting factor, and I think 2.5" drives are currently maxed out at 5400 rpm, instead of the 7200 speeds that are typical in a 3.5" drive
          Wrong. There are 7200rpm 2.5" drives.
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          • #6
            Thanx for the replys,

            So is it really not worth buying a SATA drive?

            an IDE would be better for me as the drive will end up in my laptop when i can afford to buy a 160gb 7200rpm 2.5 jobbie for the car
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            • #7
              keep in mind, you will need a floppy drive every time you do a windows XP install or repair, because it has to load drivers before setup will recognize the drive, and it ONLY allows loading from a floppy... not HD, not CD, not USB flash drive, etc. and if you're going to be tweaking a lot, like trying nLited installs, that can be a pain, especially if you don't want to have to keep a floppy drive installed in the carPC all the time.

              not to mention, you don't need huge hard drive speed in a carPC. playing MP3's, or even watching video files, isn't going to take huge HD bandwidth, so SATA is just overkill... just get a laptop HD for the carPC and you'll be better off.
              But don't take it from me! here's a quote from a real, live newbie:
              Originally posted by Viscouse
              I am learning buttloads just by searching on this forum. I've learned 2 big things so far: 1-it's been done before, and 2-if it hasn't, there is a way to do it.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by evandude
                keep in mind, you will need a floppy drive every time you do a windows XP install or repair, because it has to load drivers before setup will recognize the drive, and it ONLY allows loading from a floppy... not HD, not CD, not USB flash drive, etc. and if you're going to be tweaking a lot, like trying nLited installs, that can be a pain, especially if you don't want to have to keep a floppy drive installed in the carPC all the time.

                not to mention, you don't need huge hard drive speed in a carPC. playing MP3's, or even watching video files, isn't going to take huge HD bandwidth, so SATA is just overkill... just get a laptop HD for the carPC and you'll be better off.
                Wrong.... HD speed greatly determines windows boot times.
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                • #9
                  Using a SATA drive increased boot time about 8 seconds, because windows had to load the SATA/RAID drivers every time the computer booted up, even when resuming from hibernate. At least this is what happened in my case.

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                  • #10
                    The only way SATA would be potentially worth it is if you run a RAPTOR 10,000RPM drive which will rape power like no tomorrow prob... something else also would be a motherboard and some do this have the controller card for it save the intialize settings so it won't add time to bootup.

                    Another thing that would really be the only viable solution to this is get a SATA to IDE converter. Sata isn't really what you would want its more the rpm speed of the drive for boot times(take my word for it check my videos you will see). So this way you could get around having to wait for the drive to boot up from the controller card but then take the RAPTOR speed gain of 10,000 RPM's.

                    Right now I am running a 7200 RPM drive once it hits the hibernate screen it loads it quite fast. I wonder how much gain you could get from it. Right now my computer boots in under 10s so its fast already.

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                    • #11
                      I have several Dell machines (desktop, slim factor) which have a mix of IDE and SATA. Rather, some machines go one way, some go the other.

                      I haven't noticed a major difference in the two, but I DO know that SATA doesn't neccesarily need any funky windows drivers. If you have onboard SATA on your MB, it should be fine with WinXP (that's my case). Some PCI based IDE/SATA controllers do need drivers at install, but even some of those are now included in the WinXP install discs.

                      In the case of the CarPC, there's no real performance advantage with SATA in terms of data transfer.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jahntassa
                        In the case of the CarPC, there's no real performance advantage with SATA in terms of data transfer.
                        Performance, probably minimal to none. But SATA does improve airflow... 7 pin SATA cable v. 80 pin ATA cable.
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                        • #13
                          01331 your wrong its not 80 pin ATA Cable its just 44 Pin, 40 for data as normal desktops IDE and the other 4 pins is for the 12v 5v Positive/Negative Wires.

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                          • #14
                            He meant 80 conductor, that's a common misnomer. Most people simply say 80 pin because it's easier. And everyone knows what you mean. Almost everyone.

                            You can get rounded, heat shrinked IDE cables that also offer improved airflow, and while SATA is thinner and more flexible, it doesn't offer a substantial gain in airflow over rounded IDE.

                            I almost bought a 7200 RPM laptop drive, but those things are power hungry.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by fonseca
                              He meant 80 conductor, that's a common misnomer. Most people simply say 80 pin because it's easier. And everyone knows what you mean. Almost everyone.

                              You can get rounded, heat shrinked IDE cables that also offer improved airflow, and while SATA is thinner and more flexible, it doesn't offer a substantial gain in airflow over rounded IDE.

                              I almost bought a 7200 RPM laptop drive, but those things are power hungry.
                              Yeh... thanks for clarifying that up

                              But rounded cables will be thicker than SATA cables.
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