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  • Fusing XMD1000

    Hello all,

    After burning up my previous unit, I want to put a in-line fuse as to make sure it doesnt happen again. I was wondering what possible solutions are out there for this since there are no 12v fuses. Do I use a 15v quick blow? I saw a picture of someones cable with inline fuses but they didnt mention how they had fused it.

    Thanks
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  • #2
    Fuses are for stopping too much current, ie Amperes. Not voltage. Typically, fusing a power cable is to keep the cable from catching fire, not to protect the equipment powered by it.
    2007 Honda Fit Sport 1.5L SOHC-VTEC

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    • #3
      Correct me if I'm wrong...
      But if the current is too high and it blows a fuse, the ciruit is severed. That would prevent the excessive current from reaching the device, thus preventing damage to it... Or is my logic just completely f-ed up?
      Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
      How about the Wiki?



      Under normal circumstances, a signature would go here.

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      • #4
        1/2 fuse amp is probably fine. I just fired up mine off my benchtop power supply and it's drawing 1/4 amp right now...

        There's a diode in the XMD1000 that will force an external fuse to blow if you connect the power backwards, thereby protecting the unit.
        Murano Sat Radio...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DarquePervert
          Correct me if I'm wrong...
          But if the current is too high and it blows a fuse, the ciruit is severed. That would prevent the excessive current from reaching the device, thus preventing damage to it... Or is my logic just completely f-ed up?
          Just somewhat f-ed up For all intents and purposes, current flows through the entire circuit simultaniously. So the fuse won't blow 'before' the current 'reaches' the device. Now, a fuse could protect the device if the device can withstand the high current for the time it take the fuse to blow (which is basically what's going on in terms of protecting your wires) but this is rarely going to be the case where sensitive electronics are concerned.

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          • #6
            yes but most devices can withstand too much current for the split second it takes the fuse to blow
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