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  • Microsoft releases Windows Embedded Automotive 7

    ARTICLE @ AUTOBLOG:
    http://www.autoblog.com/2010/10/20/m...-automotive-7/

    PRESS RELEASE:
    Microsoft Drives the Future of In-Vehicle Infotainment

    Release of Windows Embedded Automotive 7 gives car makers and suppliers the tools, technology and flexibility to transform the in-car experience.

    DETROIT, Oct. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Today at the SAE Convergence 2010 Conference and Exhibition, Microsoft Corp. announced the availability of Windows Embedded Automotive 7 to select car makers and suppliers in the automotive industry. Designed to support the development of new infotainment systems, Windows Embedded Automotive 7 is an industry-leading platform providing integrated services for communication, entertainment, navigation and information for the mass market.

    With Windows Embedded Automotive 7, car makers and suppliers have access to Microsoft's latest tools and technology, as well as a worldwide partner ecosystem, which allows them to quickly create in-vehicle experiences that are easier to use and more engaging for drivers and passengers. Key features include speech commands, touch input, hands-free Bluetooth phone communications, advanced dashboard systems for access to music, maps, third-party apps and navigation, and streamlined connectivity with other devices.

    "Microsoft deeply understands that technology collaboration is paramount to the evolution of integrated, in-vehicle infotainment systems," said Kevin Dallas, general manager of the Windows Embedded Business Unit at Microsoft. "We are excited to create new opportunities with Windows Embedded Automotive 7 working with our broad ecosystem of partners to bring the best in entertainment and productivity solutions to drivers and passengers around the world."

    Additional Windows Embedded Automotive 7 features include the following:

    Silverlight for Windows Embedded. Silverlight for Windows Embedded gives car makers the ability to quickly create rich device user experiences with engaging 2-D and 3-D graphics by using a familiar Microsoft technology and taking advantage of a large ecosystem of Microsoft Silverlight designers. Experiences built in Silverlight for Windows Embedded can be refined rapidly on the desktop and deployed unchanged to the target device facilitating flawless delivery from designer to developer.

    Microsoft Tellme speech technology. Microsoft Tellme speech technology powers simple and hands-free system commands such as allowing the entire interface to be driven through speech. In addition, new support for SMS reply by voice allows text message replies to be constructed by speech. Windows Embedded Automotive 7 also supports eight languages: U.S. English, U.K. English, German, Mexican Spanish, Continental Spanish, Canadian French, Continental French and Korean.

    Next-generation automotive system tools. New tools for developers support the stable integration of advanced, high-performance, third-party systems and include improved test modules with easy-to-use product engineering guidelines to help simplify the development process, increase reliability and speed time to market.

    "Consumers are increasingly demanding access to new multimedia content, productivity solutions, and connected services for entertainment and communication from their in-vehicle system, similar to what they expect from their other devices," said Thilo Koslowski, vice president in the Industry Advisory Service Manufacturing group at Gartner Inc. "To build and deploy compelling in-vehicle infotainment system, experienced technology partners, car makers and suppliers must come together. The result of these collaborations turn the automobile into a seamless extension of the digital lifestyle."

    Strong Partnerships and Momentum for the Road Ahead

    Drivers and passengers today can experience Windows Embedded Automotive in more than 80 vehicle models worldwide through solutions from partners including Ford Motor Co., Kia Motors Corp., Fiat Group Automobiles S.p.A., Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Paccar Inc., and Alpine Electronics Inc. Highlights include the following:

    Ford goes global with SYNC. This month, Ford announced that MyFord Touch, the second generation of Ford SYNC, built on the Windows Embedded Automotive platform, is launching in Europe and Asia early next year. SYNC has been installed in more than 2.5 million vehicles in North America since its launch in 2007.

    Nissan LEAF information hub. Today, Microsoft also announced that the 2011 Nissan LEAF touchscreen information hub is powered by Windows Embedded Automotive technology, providing drivers and passengers with a navigation system and electricity charging station locator. It also shares power consumption monitoring information with drivers, and enables easy in-car climate monitoring.

    Fiat. Fiat Group Automobiles is bringing the Fiat 500 to the North American market in 2010. The 500 includes Fiat's Blue&Me technology, powered by Microsoft, a media gateway that integrates mobile phones and digital music players into audio system and controls of the car, allowing voice control of these devices by the driver.

    Alpine. Alpine Electronics of America Inc. delivered advanced in-vehicle navigation systems, powered by Windows Embedded Automotive, to car manufacturers, including satellite-guided, turn-by-turn directions and useful features, such as voice-guided controls, and information on more than 7 million points of interest.

    More information is available from the Windows Embedded Newsroom at http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/p...d/default.aspx or by following MSFTWEB on Twitter for updates.

    More information on the capabilities and features of Windows Embedded Automotive 7, as well as the entire Windows Embedded portfolio of platforms and technologies, is available at http://www.microsoft.com/windowsembedded.

    Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) is the worldwide leader in software, services and solutions that help people and businesses realize their full potential.

    SOURCE Microsoft Corp.
    Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
    How about the Wiki?



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  • #2
    Ohh look they added navigation to winCE and are trying to market it as a new product...
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    • #3
      actually, Windows Automotive is not a new product.... it's been around for a while and is what Ford Sync is running under the covers.
      EWF, HORM, MinLogon on XP.

      Zotac ION Atom N330, 2GB low-profile RAM, M3-ATX
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      • #4
        But it's version 7! And Windows7 is such a great product, Windows Automotive 7 must be great, too!


        I apologize if I dripped any sarcasm on anyone.
        Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
        How about the Wiki?



        Under normal circumstances, a signature would go here.

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        • #5
          So for a carpc hobbyist, is there any reason to actually run an embedded version of an OS? Does CF/RR/OM/etc.. actually run better on an embedded system due to less bulk, or would the extra features and driver support actually be beneficial?

          One day, the carpc hobby might actually die down as manufacturers release products that meet or exceed the capabilities that one can design himself with a carpc.

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          • #6
            Where can I buy a copy? Will it run and do everything win embedded did? I like silverlight too, which is much better than adobe's "Crash".
            Worklogs: 08 Sequoia Platinum Carputer (In Progress!)
            Skin: MetroSex on the Beach preview

            07 Infiniti Fx35 (done!) & 06 Infiniti M35 (gone...)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nobb View Post
              So for a carpc hobbyist, is there any reason to actually run an embedded version of an OS? Does CF/RR/OM/etc.. actually run better on an embedded system due to less bulk, or would the extra features and driver support actually be beneficial?

              One day, the carpc hobby might actually die down as manufacturers release products that meet or exceed the capabilities that one can design himself with a carpc.
              There are threads and threads about customizing windows, slimming it down, removing bulk and making it quicker. Removing unneeded junk from the OS and only running what you need sounds efficient doesn't it? Also, if you think about it, frontends like OM/CF/etc are designed to replace the windows shell (the windows desktop). In most modern CarPCs, users boot to the windows shell and then launch/autolaunch the frontend. In other words, you are running two shells needlessly.

              In LinuxICE, nGhost was the only shell. We also only installed on top of core Linux *only* the stuff we thought were useful to users. This subsequently made LinuxICE the fastest OS + frontend combination ever.

              So in short, yes, an embedded OS can help improve a number of things for a carpc enthusiast.

              Where can I buy a copy? Will it run and do everything win embedded did? I like silverlight too, which is much better than adobe's "Crash".
              That's likely going to be the one issue here. It's not like Linux where you can just download, hack, and redistribute. It is also probably not targeted at non-OEMs like us. MS may be picky about who they license this "gem" to.
              Former author of LinuxICE, nghost, nobdy.
              Current author of Automotive Message Broker (AMB).
              Works on Tizen IVI. Does not represent anyone or anything but himself.

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              • #8
                Humph...My wife has an msdn account, I wonder if I can find it there...
                Worklogs: 08 Sequoia Platinum Carputer (In Progress!)
                Skin: MetroSex on the Beach preview

                07 Infiniti Fx35 (done!) & 06 Infiniti M35 (gone...)

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                • #9
                  Windows embedded requires a one time license fee...which makes it prohibitively expensive for anything less then 100 licenses (more like 1000)...

                  Win Embedded and Windows Automative are completely different...one is based on windows nt version 7.....the other based on windows ce version 7. Different kernels, different apis, completely incompatible with each other. Considering windows automotive usually runs on low powered arm hardware performance of any software would likely be lower. That said, on equal hardware ce is a more optimized and streamline kernel which would likely run faster.

                  @tripzero:
                  Not true...while many users run it on top of the windows shell thats a preference thing. You can just as easily replace the windows shell with your favorite front end and only run 1.
                  Yea yea linuxice is so great thats why development stopped It still uses the same archaic boot process linux has been using since the start of time. When the boot process is actually optimized for the needs of the carPC community then it will be truly impressive.

                  @SFiorito:
                  yes im well aware...and every 2 years they rename the platform hoping someone will actually find it useful....i kinda wish it would just die already.
                  openMobile - An open source C# Front End (why choose openMobile?)
                  - Always Recruiting Developers -
                  Like what you see? Donations are always welcome

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by justchat_1 View Post
                    @tripzero:
                    Not true...while many users run it on top of the windows shell thats a preference thing. You can just as easily replace the windows shell with your favorite front end and only run 1.
                    I'm quite aware that you can replace windows' shell with a frontend. Most people don't though (probably because of deficiencies in the frontends themselves... which I don't really blame them, it's not easy rewriting an OS which essentially a frontend needs completely abstract the user away from the implementation details of the OS.).

                    Yea yea linuxice is so great thats why development stopped
                    Development never stopped. It just changed targets. Development is ongoing and secret hints of awesomeness are in flight. But that's beside the point. My point was to illustrate how a specialized OS of any type has advantages over Desktop operating systems on things other than desktops.

                    It still uses the same archaic boot process linux has been using since the start of time. When the boot process is actually optimized for the needs of the carPC community then it will be truly impressive
                    .

                    I assume you are referring to the Sys-V init process? While some distros still use this ancient (stable, and proven) boot process, others like Ubuntu have moved on to more modern event-based boot mechanisms such as Upstart which have proven to be quite fast. LinuxICE had upstart but was using a sys-v-init compatibility layer for processes that weren't updated to use upstart. Later versions of Ubuntu fixed this and that is why you see considerable boot speed increases if you update LinuxICE.

                    If by 'archaic' you mean "loading processes from disk into memory, device detection, etc" then I don't see how windows or any modern operating system is different. None of that has changed much since the dawn of the modern computer on any operating system. Although, some OS's do things in different order to appear to boot quickly, ie the classic windows XP desktop appearing but being completely unusable for several more seconds until it finishes loading junk... or another one of my personal favorites, the input device detection that happens post login.

                    At any rate, if you have suggestions on how to make the boot process more optimized than the proven only-load-what-the-user-will-need method... I'm all ears .
                    Former author of LinuxICE, nghost, nobdy.
                    Current author of Automotive Message Broker (AMB).
                    Works on Tizen IVI. Does not represent anyone or anything but himself.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tripzero View Post
                      I'm quite aware that you can replace windows' shell with a frontend. Most people don't though (probably because of deficiencies in the frontends themselves... which I don't really blame them, it's not easy rewriting an OS which essentially a frontend needs completely abstract the user away from the implementation details of the OS.).
                      oh trust me I know lol

                      Originally posted by tripzero View Post
                      Development never stopped. It just changed targets. Development is ongoing and secret hints of awesomeness are in flight. But that's beside the point. My point was to illustrate how a specialized OS of any type has advantages over Desktop operating systems on things other than desktops.

                      I assume you are referring to the Sys-V init process? While some distros still use this ancient (stable, and proven) boot process, others like Ubuntu have moved on to more modern event-based boot mechanisms such as Upstart which have proven to be quite fast. LinuxICE had upstart but was using a sys-v-init compatibility layer for processes that weren't updated to use upstart. Later versions of Ubuntu fixed this and that is why you see considerable boot speed increases if you update LinuxICE.

                      If by 'archaic' you mean "loading processes from disk into memory, device detection, etc" then I don't see how windows or any modern operating system is different. None of that has changed much since the dawn of the modern computer on any operating system. Although, some OS's do things in different order to appear to boot quickly, ie the classic windows XP desktop appearing but being completely unusable for several more seconds until it finishes loading junk... or another one of my personal favorites, the input device detection that happens post login.

                      At any rate, if you have suggestions on how to make the boot process more optimized than the proven only-load-what-the-user-will-need method... I'm all ears .
                      Actually I haven't experienced a post-startup slowdown on windows since windows 98 (which is probably the last time you used windows)... but you do have a point and i think the right balance lies somewhere in the middle. Just because microsoft screwed the idea up doesn't mean the idea is flawed just microsofts implementation of it.
                      Microsofts implementation is a free for all...everything tries to load at once after startup, and they all use the default thread priority which causes them to fight with UI apps. The proper approach to this is a managed init sequence post boot. Instead of having everything load at once you have a post boot script that handles loading everything not required to boot the PC and does so at a lower thread priority. This prevents resource lockup, lag, and the other negative effects of the microsoft approach. The goal of booting should be just that, to boot the PC. It should get the bare minimum running to display the UI and get music playing. Things like wifi are fine to not have running until 5-10seconds after boot if the boot time is 3-4seconds faster.
                      The other half of this is getting rid of the hardware detection steps. Hardware enumeration should only occur when hardware changes, re-enumerating devices and detecting settings on every boot is a giant waste of time and resources...surely this 1980s approach is due for a modern update.
                      As you can tell I'm not saying windows or any other OS does it "better" just that none of them do it the best way for a carPC.
                      openMobile - An open source C# Front End (why choose openMobile?)
                      - Always Recruiting Developers -
                      Like what you see? Donations are always welcome

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                      • #12
                        Well, I actually like wifi to be on instantly, as I have lots of apps and gadgets that depend on it (traffic, calendar, email, etc.).

                        As for hardware detection, does that mean another OS for portable devices (tablets, notebooks, other docking PCs)? I mean, it's important (for me) for the device to be able to detect hardware changes as it is undocked, docked in different stations. Even after resume from sleep/hibernation. Win7 (or CF) screws up that from time to time. I have a docking station at the office with mouse and a dedicated keyboard, another at the kitchen with one portable keyboard/pointing stick thing, and now another dock in the car with HD radio and space navigator/no keyboard. More importantantly in the car I have another screen and (edit: external sound card), and sometimes I have to reboot because CF/RR do not recognize some of that if it just wakes up (even when win7 is fine with it).

                        I don't know why hardware detection is such a big deal, but apparently it is.
                        Worklogs: 08 Sequoia Platinum Carputer (In Progress!)
                        Skin: MetroSex on the Beach preview

                        07 Infiniti Fx35 (done!) & 06 Infiniti M35 (gone...)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RipplingHurst View Post
                          Well, I actually like wifi to be on instantly, as I have lots of apps and gadgets that depend on it (traffic, calendar, email, etc.).
                          Its all relative....nothing is instant on-you have to wait for the PC to boot. The question is, do you want to wait 15 seconds from the time you hit the power button until anything works...or would you rather have music in 10 and wifi in 15? Personally I prefer the latter and I think most other users would as well.

                          Originally posted by RipplingHurst View Post
                          As for hardware detection, does that mean another OS for portable devices (tablets, notebooks, other docking PCs)? I mean, it's important (for me) for the device to be able to detect hardware changes as it is undocked, docked in different stations. Even after resume from sleep/hibernation. Win7 (or CF) screws up that from time to time. I have a docking station at the office with mouse and a dedicated keyboard, another at the kitchen with one portable keyboard/pointing stick thing, and now another dock in the car with HD radio and space navigator/no keyboard. More importantantly in the car I have another screen and (edit: external sound card), and sometimes I have to reboot because CF/RR do not recognize some of that if it just wakes up (even when win7 is fine with it).

                          I don't know why hardware detection is such a big deal, but apparently it is.
                          Two different things here...removable device enumeration always has to occur (since there could be ipods, removable drives, etc plugged in)...its core hardware that shouldn't have to be. Things like internal hard drive, wifi adapter, sound card, cpu, etc. that rarely change shouldn't have to be re-detected every boot.
                          openMobile - An open source C# Front End (why choose openMobile?)
                          - Always Recruiting Developers -
                          Like what you see? Donations are always welcome

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by justchat_1 View Post
                            Its all relative....nothing is instant on-you have to wait for the PC to boot. The question is, do you want to wait 15 seconds from the time you hit the power button until anything works...or would you rather have music in 10 and wifi in 15? Personally I prefer the latter and I think most other users would as well.
                            Well, not the users who kept OEM equip where the carputer playing music is just another option for entertainment, but the only one for traffic, news, everything else.

                            Two different things here...removable device enumeration always has to occur (since there could be ipods, removable drives, etc plugged in)...its core hardware that shouldn't have to be. Things like internal hard drive, wifi adapter, sound card, cpu, etc. that rarely change shouldn't have to be re-detected every boot.
                            I agree but, at home/office I use wi-fi, 3G via usb in the car; sound card changes also, from internal at home/office to external Tascam usb (then the internal is for the rear passengers). So I see very much sense in MS approach if that's what you're pointing at.

                            Maybe I'm in the exception here too, but still all notebooks are in the same category.
                            Worklogs: 08 Sequoia Platinum Carputer (In Progress!)
                            Skin: MetroSex on the Beach preview

                            07 Infiniti Fx35 (done!) & 06 Infiniti M35 (gone...)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by justchat_1 View Post
                              oh trust me I know lol

                              Actually I haven't experienced a post-startup slowdown on windows since windows 98 (which is probably the last time you used windows)... but you do have a point and i think the right balance lies somewhere in the middle. Just because microsoft screwed the idea up doesn't mean the idea is flawed just microsofts implementation of it.
                              Microsofts implementation is a free for all...everything tries to load at once after startup, and they all use the default thread priority which causes them to fight with UI apps. The proper approach to this is a managed init sequence post boot. Instead of having everything load at once you have a post boot script that handles loading everything not required to boot the PC and does so at a lower thread priority. This prevents resource lockup, lag, and the other negative effects of the microsoft approach. The goal of booting should be just that, to boot the PC. It should get the bare minimum running to display the UI and get music playing. Things like wifi are fine to not have running until 5-10seconds after boot if the boot time is 3-4seconds faster.
                              The other half of this is getting rid of the hardware detection steps. Hardware enumeration should only occur when hardware changes, re-enumerating devices and detecting settings on every boot is a giant waste of time and resources...surely this 1980s approach is due for a modern update.
                              As you can tell I'm not saying windows or any other OS does it "better" just that none of them do it the best way for a carPC.
                              The last time I used windows was right before Vista came out. I was using XP before most people were. I won a free copy in a local university programming contest back when I was in high school. I actually like XP a lot. It's by far my favorite Windows OS. What I said was from experience of using XP. At some point my motherboard died and I didn't want to call up microsoft to get my key renewed when I reinstalled. I was using Linux a bit at that point and decided to make the full switch for a while. Never looked back after that. I continued using XP at work up until 2009. I've been all Linux everywhere since then.

                              Linux booting has been improved greatly in the past 3 years or so. One of the major improvements have been faster filesystems and sreadahead. sreadahead loads frequently used blocks from the disk into memory in parallel during the boot process so user applications boot up instantly. This was useful in helping nghost start up quickly (even though it was already near instant to begin with). If it's not useful, it can always be removed which is another cool thing about Linux, you can totally modify the way it boots.

                              Nasa's MeeGo boot at AFKfest was probably the fastest I've ever seen a system boot. I think he would have beat my best times with LinuxICE using Ubuntu.

                              At any rate, it's nice to be able to boot fast, but I think that a power efficiency race will trump the booting arms race. Being able to stay on in some low power mode is far more useful then being dead asleep.
                              Former author of LinuxICE, nghost, nobdy.
                              Current author of Automotive Message Broker (AMB).
                              Works on Tizen IVI. Does not represent anyone or anything but himself.

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