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  • Saving DVD movies to hard drive?

    Alright guys, I've been searching around the net forever about this, but can't really find a definitive answer..

    How can I save DVDs to my computer so I can watch them on my computer?

    Some say it can be done without any software, some say you need special software.

    So what exactly is the truth? How do you guys do it? If you do need software, is there any free stuff out there (that doesnt leave a watermark or something in the movie)?

    I just want to be able to copy my DVDs to my computer so I can watch them, without any loss in quality (video & audio).

    Any help is VERY appreciated!

    Edit: By the way, these are all DVDs that I OWN. I dont want to burn them onto a disk or share them in any way.

  • #2
    Ok, this is a touchy subject and since you mentioned you don't want to share them, you at least acknowledge that fact....lol.

    It is illegal to copy your dvd's to a backup, in the United States. To be more specific, it's not illegal to copy your dvd's, it's illegal to bypass copyright protection (which is what you have to do to copy your dvd's).

    To recap - Fair use of media allows you to change formats of DVDs etc that you own HOWEVER it is illegal to circumvent copy protection methods. As most DVDs carry this you cant rip them without breaking the law.

    If any of your dvd's don't have copyright protection, you can legally copy it. Since you will never find any commercial dvd that doesn't have copyright protection, you'll never be able to do what you want to do.

    Hope that's clear as mud...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by shibby2 View Post
      How can I save DVDs to my computer so I can watch them on my computer?

      Some say it can be done without any software, some say you need special software.
      While I think any direct linking might not be in the forumīs or my own best interest, see the wikipedia entry here.
      2008 Ford Mustang GT/CS CARPC(99%)
      Software: Ride/Road-Runner, Digital FX skin 5.x, iGuidance 2011, GPSgate on Win7 64bit

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      • #4
        Ha ha ha.

        I will add that it *is* possible with special software. I have copied my friend's DVDs from a much loved series onto my computer with no special software (drag and drop files). So I do know that is possible, but playing them back became clunky and nothing like having the actual DVD in. I eventually deleted the huge files as I had no intent to get conversion software so I could burn them to disc properly.
        Basically, if you live in the States, it will be technically illegal to do what you are trying to do. Just keep that in mind.

        Legally: a number of newer movies have a limited-use digital copy disc that you can put on a hard drive. I have a few like this but I don't know how many times you can copy it, or it can only be copied off the disc directly or some such. This is a legal digital copy method in this country. Those discs also require Bo special software unless it is included with the disc.


        -Ryven

        via iPhone

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        • #5
          It's definitely possible, but also illegal. Which is why I chose not to tell him how or give links. A Google search will give him what he wants.

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          • #6
            It's very easy. I store all of my movies on a central server and I play them back on my Dune 3.0 Prime player and also my HTPC, and there are thousands of people that also do it. I also have movies on my carpc. Explaining how to use tools to make copies of movies you own certainly isn't forbidden or illegal. Go over to avsforum and check out the HTPC board - you'll find all of the information you need. Be aware that this applies to copies that you own - I don't support pirating and think it's a slap in the face to people that produce movies.

            http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=26
            1999 Mercury Grand Marquis GS with: ASRock E350M1 w/4GB RAM, 80GB Intel SSD, Opus DCX3.120, Visteon HD Radio + HDR-USB, PL-18N wifi, OBDLink Scan Tool, BTA6210 BT, BU-353, Win 7 Ultimate, CF 4.0, Alpine MRP-F240 + MRP-T220, RF Punch 1572s, Kicker 8" Comp.

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            • #7
              Ok..ummm thanks, I think. lmao

              I know all about the legalities of it, just wanted to see what everyone uses. I'll check out that forum though, thanks for the link.

              I tried Handbrake last night, but can't seem to get it to work.

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              • #8
                I use handbrake everyday. I am converting my whole 800+ dvd/bluray collection do my harddrive for my HTPC. Its easy...I have a Mac mini and i load the disc and open handbrake and find the file and click start n a hour later its saved to the designated directory I use for Plex.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kegobeer View Post
                  Explaining how to use tools to make copies of movies you own certainly isn't forbidden or illegal.
                  Technically, yes, it is. If you read the Wikipedia entry this has not formally been set one way or another, but with the DMCA still in play, it is necessary to circumvent copy protections, which if direct information is provided is considered the same thing in the states here.

                  And in the case of the old program mentioned to do this, Macrovision actually bought the rights to the program so they could prosecute, citing copyright violations. Obviously, I don't see this being pressed, but you never know. The entertainment industry keeps the testicles of the politicians in it's pocket.
                  2008 Ford Mustang GT/CS CARPC(99%)
                  Software: Ride/Road-Runner, Digital FX skin 5.x, iGuidance 2011, GPSgate on Win7 64bit

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                  • #10
                    Got another question..

                    What do you guys use to convert VOB files to AVI?

                    I tried one, but it didnt work.

                    Any thoughts?

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                    • #11
                      Create a new file on pc and name it the dvd you wish to copy. Then copy(drop&drag) dvd to that file. Software like Nero9-10 has a programe called"NERO HOME ESSENTIALS" or "CYBERLINK DVD SUITE". These programes reckonise the file as a whole dvd and not as vob files. You just click on it(dvd file)and it will play. As for converting vob files to avi? I use a programe called"SUPER" It converts any video files into many formats and it is free to download. I have to use SUPER to convert my camcorder vob files to avi.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by shibby2 View Post
                        Alright guys, I've been searching around the net forever about this, but can't really find a definitive answer..

                        How can I save DVDs to my computer so I can watch them on my aftermarket part computer?

                        Some say it can be done without any software, some say you need special software.

                        So what exactly is the truth? How do you guys do it? If you do need software, is there any free stuff out there (that doesnt leave a watermark or something in the movie)?

                        I just want to be able to copy my DVDs to my computer so I can watch them, without any loss in quality (video & audio).

                        Any help is VERY appreciated!

                        Edit: By the way, these are all DVDs that I OWN. I dont want to burn them onto a disk or share them in any way.
                        You won't get arrested for doing this so I don't think you have to worry about burning it on a hard drive, etc.
                        Last edited by DoubleDuro; 02-09-2012, 02:01 PM.

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                        • #13
                          DVD's was so last century. Upgrade and start "saving" your blu-ray and 3D content to MKV files. Just imagine having access to thousands of movies on a single HTPC that houses an array of 12 2tb drives in your living room with surround sound

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                          • #14
                            The first thing you need to consider is that most movies today are distributed on approximately 7.5 GB DVDs. A one-terabyte hard drive can handle about 931 GB of usable data. That’s room for only about 124 standard-definition movies.

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