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  • Car painting?

    Has anyone here painted their own car? I have an '84 Saab and I want to get it painted but since its an '84 Im not sure how much longer I'll be having it. Thus I do not want to take it to a good local shop then have it break down it 6 months. Anyway I have access to an air sprayer and have an air tank but I am not sure what other materials I will need. I want it to come out nice but I am not expecting much as it is more of a learning experiance and no matter what I do it will pretty much be better than what I have now. So does anyone know any good sites or books for info or any personal tips?
    Thanks

  • #2
    painting ones car......
    this is a hella job dude. You have to sand the whole thing down to bare metal
    Put about three to six coats of primer sanding in between each coat
    then paint 6 to 10 coats of paint sanding between each coat.
    then 3 coats of clear coat sand between each one of those except the last.
    Originally posted by menudude
    thank you all for your help minus the useless post by sjlucky...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by SjLucky
      painting ones car......
      this is a hella job dude. You have to sand the whole thing down to bare metal
      Put about three to six coats of primer sanding in between each coat
      then paint 6 to 10 coats of paint sanding between each coat.
      then 3 coats of clear coat sand between each one of those except the last.
      wow... talk about overkill!! are you making a show car or something

      if you want to do it yourself... you are in for a TON of work. not as much as above... but still a lot.

      1. you dont have to strip the car to bare metal. yes, a complete strip *will* give you the best results. but lets be serious. this is a 1984 saab. not exactly a prime candidate for a full body paint restoration.

      2. if you do strip it to bare metal... you have to IMMEDIATELY sandblast and clean the body, and then spray it with an etching primer. that in itself is a lot of work, b/c if you wait too long, the body will oxidize and you have to do it over again.

      3. cleanliness is truely important. if you cant get a dust free environment... it is going to come out like crap. also, painting in the winter (its gonna be winter here) is horrible for painting.

      check out www. hotrodders.com , they have a VERY knowledgible paint group there. again.. probably overkill, but they can help u with basic repainting tips and techniques. even if it is for a 1984 saab.

      ~mike
      Single Member of the "1000 Post and No MP3 Car" Club
      PROJECT ON INDEFINATE HOLD... BOUGHT A HOUSE
      2000 Cavalier Z24 [###-------] Only 30% Done ... Still

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SjLucky
        painting ones car......
        this is a hella job dude. You have to sand the whole thing down to bare metal
        Put about three to six coats of primer sanding in between each coat
        then paint 6 to 10 coats of paint sanding between each coat.
        then 3 coats of clear coat sand between each one of those except the last.
        Um..no u dont, you can sand down the clear coat untill all of it is out. Fill in all the little dips, ect. with metal glaze (thats what I use) apply a tack coat, a base coat, your paint, then your clear. Sand and buff,
        Sand and buff, Sand and buff, gradually going from 800 to 2000 grit. Honestly, have it done. Theres alot more than just sanding and spraying. Too much sanding can "burn" the paint, and you have to sand it a certain way or u can burn it and leave swirl marks. Trust me, I work at night and on weekends @ a custom body/paint shop. A good paint job requires LOTS of prep work, and lots of finish work to get a nice shine without orange peel . As far as price, you get what u pay for...
        This is my bosses car
        http://www.barrykclark.com/pix/Liquid%20Reflections/
        we just finished it about a month ago.
        2011 Nissan Frontier SL
        AMD X3 2.2 | M4-ATX | 16Gb SSD | 2GB DDR3-1333 | MSI GF615M-P33 MB
        OBDPROS USB | BU-303 GPS l LILLIPUT TS | Car2PC adapter | XM Direct | USB Dual band N with custom mag-mount antenna.

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        • #5
          I paint a lot of stuff, but cars is where I draw the line. It's too much work. I know a couple people that tried painting their cars... one of them looked decent, but the other one was complete crap. If you can, try finding a cheap shop that will do it. It'll be worth it even if you spend a few hundred getting it done (compared to a thousand or more). Because if it breaks down, you could sell it or get money and rebuild.

          Haha... it almost looks like he ran over somebody with that car. *splat*

          Comment


          • #6
            It's not that hard. We sprayed my friend's Mustang with black and it came out great. It was our first paint job and with some care you can do it and have it look decent - especially if you are going to be getting rid of the car soon. Prep work is the most important part of the whole thing. I'm assuming you don't want to do tons and tons of work as you stated that you don't really think you'll have the car for much longer and are just trying to get it to look presentable.

            Here's some stuff I found out after painting a couple cars as well as small pieces such as valve covers, intakes and the like.

            1. You don't have to take it down to bare metal, as was stated and correctly refuted in a later post. Even if you don't want to fix any existing dents or dings, you will probably find some repair work necessary after you start sanding. Don't go to too harsh a grit as you'll only make deep scratches in the existing paint and make more work for yourself. Go to a nice fine grit paper and then lay down your tack and base. I would suggest guide coats, block sanding and stuff but you probably don't want to go to that extent - filling in all the little voids and imprefections.

            2. Mask the car off - Take your time! Use good masking tape as the crummy cheap kind will frustrate you by either not sticking and coming off in the middle of the painting or just as bad - it doesn't want to come off when you're trying to remove it - leaving glue marks and tape material. Use masking paper - not newspaper. Go to an auto paint supply store or if you don't have one, a Home Depot and get masking paper. Spray your color coat - we used just 2 coats or color and then the clear. Also - we washed the floor down in the garage to make sure we got all of the dust and such. Don't forget to wash the car off, too - you have to get all sanding debris off. Also - use compressed air to blow out the crevises - before washing and after. We also put a chain in the exhaust and let it touch the floor to discharge the car and hopefully stop any more dust being attracted to the car.

            3. Wet sand and buff - be careful not to melt the paint around the edges. and body lines. Don't use an orbital buffer as it really doesn't spin fast enough to get the desired results.

            4. As far as buffing grits, I can't remember what it was that we used but they were 3M...I thing there was a 'rough,' fine and then I think we used 3M Imperial glaze.

            5. Most of your imperfections (orange peel, etc.) in the clear can be fixed by wet sanding and buffing. If the imperfection is in your color coat, well then you're going to have to live with it unless you want to go to through the hassle of spot fixing. That opens up a whole bunch of other things to worry about. So, make sure you thoroughly examine the car between coats. We ran out of color mid spray and had to come back the next day and use an activator (I can't remember the name of it) to allow the color we were going to spray on to stick. Also, we used a Urethane paint which didn't require flex (an additive for the paint to allow it to flex) for plastic and rubber parts.

            I hope this helps. Again, I am by no means a professional...this is just stuff I learned by doing a few cars and parts. If it sounds like too much work and you don't really care to do it, why don't you do the prep work and bring it to Maaco or the like and have them mask it and spray the color. I had a car done by them in high school. I did all the prep work on the car and had all the lights and trim on by 2 bolts and when I got there, took all that stuff off, masked the holes left by the tail light bulbs and they sprayed it. If you go that route, make sure you mask off the exhaust and gas tank as they won't. It looked good - and stood up to the weather (it was outside its entire life). Don't expect much shine from their paint jobs as they use a single stage paint.

            - Jeff
            95 Mustang GT Convertible
            87 Mustang GT Convertible
            My Project | Let's Go Mets! | SCT Tuners

            Project Status [===#===] [Bezel and dash creation]

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            • #7
              It's not that hard. We sprayed my friend's Mustang with black and it came out great. It was our first paint job and with some care you can do it and have it look decent - especially if you are going to be getting rid of the car soon.

              Yes it can be done. I done my friends car, hehe "experiment" first time I did it. Yup it turn out quite well, its metalic paint too. The preperation work is not hard, its just very time consuming.

              I use metallic paint, activator, lacquer and thinner, you can buy them from specialist paint shops. Just get the setting, mixture and technique right so you dont get that so called "orange peel" or runs. You have to adjust the air pressure to get everything right and of course the gun. Add some thinner as required to get the best results. Dont get impatient where you start spraying too much to get the job done quickly, this is where you gonna have the runs. Wear suitable mask and clothing, and have good ventilation. The smell of the paint will knock you out

              Always always practice first till you get it right, then apply it on the car.

              Read on, this is where I learnt

              http://www.scottgrundfor.com/ideas/paint3.html

              Im sure its much easier with the non metalic paints. Probably the most difficult parts is getting the dust out of the paints if you are painting in the garage. Getting the exact colour shade is hard too, but I guess thats life. Cant really compare old paints with new ones I guess. Imperfection can be fixed, but if possible you want to minimise as it is hard work correcting too many.

              Good luck...but as I said it can be done with good results from home. Try it if you think your results wont matter much and you have access to the tools. We all have to start somewhere, cant rely on other poeple too much

              I tell you it is a good experience.

              Comment


              • #8
                there is no such thing as over kill only lazy people
                Originally posted by menudude
                thank you all for your help minus the useless post by sjlucky...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SjLucky
                  there is no such thing as over kill only lazy people

                  noted...
                  current projects

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Has anyone here painted their own car?

                    No never...but someone else car yes

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      OK, good thing I'm a painter. DuPont certified commercial refinisher. I paint semi's. You have it right with the sanding so far, ther is absolutely no need to go down to the bare metal at all. You only need to sand it enough for the new finish to have a chance to stick, and enough to remove any orange peel or other imperfections from the old finish. Doing it yourself, I would say use a basecoat/clearcoat instead of a single stage. Base is so easy to spray, a monkey could do it. It dries like right now, and unless you put it on with a fire hose, you shouldn't run it. I'll give you a real short basic break down of what to do:

                      1 - Wash the car! The number one reason for a crappy paint job. If the surface isn't clean you will just sand the dirt and oils in farther.

                      2 - Use a wax and grease remover solvent and wipe it down.

                      3 - Sand with 400 grit on an orbital sander.

                      4 - Make any repairs you need to do, If you don't know how then you shouldn't be doing this at all. Bare metal spots will need an etch primer or a direct to metal epoxy. Make sure that any primers and paints you use are the same brand and from the same system, then you are gauranteed compatability and adhesion. Also, do not prime over 80 grit scratches. Hi-build primers mean same film build in less coats, not for filling. finish any bodywork in at least 150 if you don't want it to sink in a month.

                      5 - Before priming any spots, wash again with wax and grease remover to get rid of any oil that spewed out of the sander. Trust me, it is there. Tack lightly and go for it.

                      6 - Sand the primer with 400.

                      7 - Blow it off, wax and grease again, tack it and your ready to spray. Follow the paint manufacturers directiions and mixing ratios to a tee! Apply as many base coats as you need to get coverage and no more. Wait the required time for it to flash off and then apply the clear. This gives the film build and protection, not the base.

                      8 - Let it dry, unmask it and enjoy! You only need to wet sand and buff any spots you screwed up like runs, dirt nibs or bugs. Modern paints do not need to be sanded between coats or buffed after they dry. Not unless you screw something up.

                      So see it's not that hard, but if you choose metallic, you might have a hard time evening it out so that there are no tiger stripes or mottling. A product that should give good results for a beginner is Nason from DuPont. Easy to apply, dries quick, and it is inexpensive.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SjLucky
                        there is no such thing as over kill only lazy people
                        for a 1984 saab... it is overkill.
                        for something like a 1957 chevy bel-air.. it wouldnt be overkill.

                        its all about perspective.

                        ~Mike
                        Single Member of the "1000 Post and No MP3 Car" Club
                        PROJECT ON INDEFINATE HOLD... BOUGHT A HOUSE
                        2000 Cavalier Z24 [###-------] Only 30% Done ... Still

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                        • #13
                          You could do it in 1 day easy. Or you could take the easy way out - Maaco.

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                          • #14
                            Nice info guys.

                            So there you have it, be brave and just paint. If it goes wrong just say "ohh well atleast I tried"

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                            • #15
                              uh o , better get maaco
                              Falcon cr53 w/ via epia m10000. Nokia 3650 blutooth phone.
                              Better than winamp. Click here for qcd player.

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