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  • Standyby power consumption

    I know this has probably been asked(therefore I searched) but I didnt find anything that helped me. I currently have a switch wired to the mobo header ofr a hibernate on press function. hibernation takes a long time to come back from, but not as long a boot up. So my question is, how much power does standby draw and would I be able to keep that power to the RAM during crank so I dont have to cold boot. As of right now I cannt survive crank with the PC on, so I dont know if it would survive being in standby while starting the car. PC Specs are in sig.

    Thanks,

  • #2
    Hibernation draws 0 power. It lets you save the ram to the disk, and therefore ends all power.

    I think what you're talking about it standby.Standby keeps power going to the RAM. Easiest way to measure it is to use a multimeter. IDK ok any calculators.

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    • #3
      you are correct, I had hibernation on the brain from my early typings. I edited it. How would I check it with a multi meter. I mean, I have 12V going to the PSU but what do I measuref rom there to see how much power I am drawing?

      Comment


      • #4
        My system (celeron 633 on a standard ATX mobo) on a M1-ATX draws about 4 amps on the input side of the M1 during standby.

        -psyrex
        Gen 1: Pentium 3 1GHz - ATX - 2005
        Gen 2: Pentium M 1.6GHz - ITX - 2006
        Gen 3: Pentium M 2.0GHz - 5.25" SBC - 2007
        Gen 4: (coming soon: Core2 Duo - 3.5" SBC - 2009)
        ...it never ends

        Comment


        • #5
          how long can you leave computer in standby before you can no longer start car due to low battery? Woudl a Yellow top help me survive crank?

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          • #6
            Uh... somehow I don't think that's right... 4 amps is a LOT of power for being in standby mode. You're talking about 48 watts there. The only way I can see you getting even CLOSE to that is through tons of USB devices because those usually maintain power as well. A more average scenario would be around .4 amps or 4.8 watts. Again a lot of this depends on what you're running though so if you really wanna know use the multimeter to measure the amps and multiply times 12.
            Originally posted by psyrex
            My system (celeron 633 on a standard ATX mobo) on a M1-ATX draws about 4 amps on the input side of the M1 during standby.

            -psyrex

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            • #7
              Can you turn off USB power during standby? Does that work or would windows freak?

              Comment


              • #8
                to measure the amps going into your PSUyoure going to need a multimeter that can read up to 10 amps probably. you need to put the leads of the multimeter IN SERIES, with the power going into your PSU. then just put your pc in stadby

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                • #9
                  Yes you can. Probably the easiest way would be to run all your usb stuff off of a powered hub which runs off a point-of-load regulator or I'm sure you could jerry-rig something and get away with it. Windows shouldn't freak out since it doesn't even know what's going on. All standy mode really does is power the ram so that you don't loose any of the data there. memory itself shouldn't take more than 3 watts to run which should give you a pretty long time to run your system off the battery. You had mentioned your curiosity about being able to crank the engine during standby. This SHOULD work, however if it doesn't, the amperage is so low that you could probably have some standard capacitors in the circuit to give the little power it needs to keep working during that time instad of a big buly lead-acid battery.
                  Originally posted by Curiosity
                  Can you turn off USB power during standby? Does that work or would windows freak?

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                  • #10
                    Yeah, in parallel would make fire.

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                    • #11
                      thanks triwav! Hah, I knew that USB hub relay on the SDC would come in handy.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by KyleYankan
                        Hibernation draws 0 power. It lets you save the ram to the disk, and therefore ends all power.
                        Actually hibernate does not cut power to the USB line - I use it in my car and my bluetooth dongle flashes even when the computer is completely hibernated. I've left it for a week or so with no power issues.

                        You can mod an opus to cut power to the USB during hibernation, not sure about the M1.

                        -Josh

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                        • #13
                          Yep, I thought it was high, too. I just checked and the multimeter is at 3.91A right now. Remember, this is from the M1-ATX's input side, this this ampage includes the mobo as well as the power supply's inefficiencies.

                          For the record, the ONLY thing here:
                          M1-ATX
                          Abit VL6 mobo
                          Celeron 633
                          6GB 4200RPM 9.5MM harddrive
                          Asus V7100PRO AGP card (GeForce2 MX400 card)
                          Lilliput touchscreen USB plugged in.


                          What are you guys getting on standby?


                          -psyrex


                          Originally posted by triwav
                          Uh... somehow I don't think that's right... 4 amps is a LOT of power for being in standby mode. You're talking about 48 watts there. The only way I can see you getting even CLOSE to that is through tons of USB devices because those usually maintain power as well. A more average scenario would be around .4 amps or 4.8 watts. Again a lot of this depends on what you're running though so if you really wanna know use the multimeter to measure the amps and multiply times 12.
                          Gen 1: Pentium 3 1GHz - ATX - 2005
                          Gen 2: Pentium M 1.6GHz - ITX - 2006
                          Gen 3: Pentium M 2.0GHz - 5.25" SBC - 2007
                          Gen 4: (coming soon: Core2 Duo - 3.5" SBC - 2009)
                          ...it never ends

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            http://www.hardware.info/en-US/artic...e_modern_PCs/9
                            Elantra GT 1.2GHz Duron, RoadRunner & LSX Void 3.2. Status: Stable...

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                            • #15
                              that's pretty high. I measured mine months ago and got something like 4 amps when it's on, 0.5 amps for standby powering the following:

                              m2atx
                              ms12000
                              7" lcd
                              laptop hdd

                              That's measured on the input side of the m2atx, as well

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