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  • Budget rear-view camera?

    Has anyone used one of these cameras?

    I just picked up a Kenwood DNX7100 and want to get a backup camera that I can flush-mount.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Color-BackUp-Rea...QQcmdZViewItem

    The price is right, but I'm unsure of the quality.

    Any input?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    One thing I should note, apparently my headunit only has a single line-in camera feed. There is one yellow connector on the headunit's pigtail so I need a camera compatible with that.

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't know, but it looks a lot like this one over at Deal Extreme. You can read the reviews there.

      http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.5891

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      • #4
        That's exactly what I am looking for. It doesn't give any specs but the reviews seem decent and it looks like it'll work perfectly with the Kenwood. The Kenwood is NTSC and everything.

        I'll order one and try it out. If it doesn't fit in the key-hole, I'll drill and mount it in my license plate with quick-connect disconnects. Certainly looks waterproof enough...

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        • #5
          Please post back when you get 'er going. Let us know how it works. I'm especially interested in hearing about the IR-mode.

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          • #6
            Will do. It'll probably be a few weeks before I go to install everything. Still trying to find out how illegal it is to drill a hole in a license plate.

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            • #7
              Hi,

              I've fitted one similar to my car:







              nick

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              • #8
                I got mine at gooddeals18.com
                or something like that... googel it...

                25 bones and its great...awesome prices too

                Comment


                • #9
                  Please post SPECS & IMPRESSIONS -on image /build quality ASAP!

                  .


                  For those of you that may receive a shipment of the ones in the link in post #3 from dealextreme...(or elsewhere)

                  PLEASE post the SPECS of the camera and your IMPRESSIONS of them ASAP !

                  Two reasons for hooking up the camera's right away:

                  A: Your impressions (Good, Bad, junk- Good pic/ bad pic -Good /bad build quality, etc ) would be appreciated by others in the market for a decent camera.

                  B: Another reason for hooking up the cameras, testing right away is I'm sure if you have to return it would make that easier.

                  (NOTE for those who can't get the cameras hooked up for weeks as mentioned above- Supply 12vdc to cameras and you can plug them into ANY TV set that has a RCA jack Video input.)


                  I myself have used the contact form on the website asking for SPECS, about 1am Sat March 1-2008. (More than likely they will not have any specs- the only way to get specs being from maybe some paperwork that might be in the box /printed on the box.)


                  PS: For those reading specs off the instruction sheet /box camera comes in the specs posted below can be used a a "form" so you don't have to type up a bunch of stuff.

                  Note below unit is CCD, instead of CMOS, most of Febay being CMOS cameras...

                  SPECS should look like this- this being off a similar camera on Febay..


                  Model: HTC33 Flush mount water proof Night Vision camera 1/3" Color CCD sensor with sharp Len.
                  Color image sensor: 3.0mm
                  Scanning System: 2:1 Interlace
                  Resolution: 420 TV Lines
                  Minimum Illumination: 0.5, 0 LUX /F1.2 with IR
                  AGC: auto
                  White Balance: Auto
                  Electronic Shutter: 1/60 ~ 1/10,000 Second
                  current Consumption: Max. 100mA
                  Power Supply 12V DC
                  Lens: f=2.8mm /F=2.0 92 degree view angle.
                  Operating & Storage Temp. <> -20C to + 60C Rh95%Max.
                  Dimension: 2.5"(D) x 1.25"(H) x 1.37(Dia)
                  IR LED Night Vision: 10 LED Lights about 20ft at low light condition




                  .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As soon as it arrives, I'll post the specs. It'll have to wait a few weeks for a review though.

                    What's the difference between CCD and CMOS?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BAC5point2 View Post
                      As soon as it arrives, I'll post the specs. It'll have to wait a few weeks for a review though.

                      What's the difference between CCD and CMOS?
                      1: Please post pics also if you can.
                      2: Several weeks? 12vdc + a regular TV set with a extension cord run to the car will allow you to see how good the pic is.

                      (Like I said you may want to test the cam's right away, in case you need to return /rma.)


                      Difference between CCD and CMOS
                      http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...=Google+Search


                      Difference Between CCD and CMOS

                      Image-sensor chips -- the chips that capture the image in digital
                      cameras -- fall into two main camps: CCD, or charge-coupled
                      device, and CMOS (pronounced see-moss), which stands for
                      complementary metal-oxide semi-conductor.

                      The main argument in favor of CCD chips is that they're more
                      sensitive than CMOS chips, so you can get better images in dim
                      lighting. CCD chips also tend to deliver cleaner images than CMOS
                      chips, which sometimes have a problem with noise -- small defects
                      in the image.

                      On the other hand, CMOS chips are less expensive to manufacture,
                      and that cost savings translates into lower camera prices. In
                      addition, CMOS chips are less power-hungry than CCD chips, so you
                      can shoot for longer periods of time before replacing the
                      camera's batteries.

                      CMOS chips also perform better than CCD chips when capturing
                      highlights, such as the sparkle of jewelry or the glint of
                      sunlight reflecting across a lake. CCD chips suffer from
                      blooming, which means creating unwanted halos around very bright
                      highlights, while CMOS sensors do not.

                      Currently, an overwhelming number of cameras use CCD technology.
                      But cameras manufacturers are working to refine CMOS technology,
                      and when they do, you can expect to hear more about this type of
                      camera.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Difference between CCD and CMOS image

                        CMOS:


                        CCD:


                        Layman version:

                        Digital cameras have become extremely common as the prices have come down. One of the drivers behind the falling prices has been the introduction of CMOS image sensors. CMOS sensors are much less expensive to manufacture than CCD sensors.

                        Both CCD (charge-coupled device) and CMOS (complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor) image sensors start at the same point -- they have to convert light into electrons. If you have read the article How Solar Cells Work, you understand one technology that is used to perform the conversion. One simplified way to think about the sensor used in a digital camera (or camcorder) is to think of it as having a 2-D array of thousands or millions of tiny solar cells, each of which transforms the light from one small portion of the image into electrons. Both CCD and CMOS devices perform this task using a variety of technologies.

                        CCD chip:


                        The next step is to read the value (accumulated charge) of each cell in the image. In a CCD device, the charge is actually transported across the chip and read at one corner of the array. An analog-to-digital converter turns each pixel's value into a digital value. In most CMOS devices, there are several transistors at each pixel that amplify and move the charge using more traditional wires. The CMOS approach is more flexible because each pixel can be read individually.

                        CCDs use a special manufacturing process to create the ability to transport charge across the chip without distortion. This process leads to very high-quality sensors in terms of fidelity and light sensitivity. CMOS chips, on the other hand, use traditional manufacturing processes to create the chip -- the same processes used to make most microprocessors. Because of the manufacturing differences, there have been some noticeable differences between CCD and CMOS sensors.

                        * CCD sensors, as mentioned above, create high-quality, low-noise images. CMOS sensors, traditionally, are more susceptible to noise.
                        * Because each pixel on a CMOS sensor has several transistors located next to it, the light sensitivity of a CMOS chip tends to be lower. Many of the photons hitting the chip hit the transistors instead of the photodiode.
                        * CMOS traditionally consumes little power. Implementing a sensor in CMOS yields a low-power sensor.
                        * CCDs use a process that consumes lots of power. CCDs consume as much as 100 times more power than an equivalent CMOS sensor.
                        * CMOS chips can be fabricated on just about any standard silicon production line, so they tend to be extremely inexpensive compared to CCD sensors.
                        * CCD sensors have been mass produced for a longer period of time, so they are more mature. They tend to have higher quality and more pixels.

                        Based on these differences, you can see that CCDs tend to be used in cameras that focus on high-quality images with lots of pixels and excellent light sensitivity. CMOS sensors traditionally have lower quality, lower resolution and lower sensitivity. CMOS sensors are just now improving to the point where they reach near parity with CCD devices in some applications. CMOS cameras are usually less expensive and have great battery life.

                        ********


                        Background info - History- More in depth tech:

                        The difference between CCD and CMOS

                        1970 is a landmark year for image processing industry; the United States Bell Labs invented the CCD. After 20 years, people use it to create the digital cameras; image-processing industries is pushed into a new field. Digital camera without film and rinse, can repeat shooting and immediate adjustment; Imaging can be copied without limit and not reduced quality, facilitate the permanent preservation and can be used for electronic transmission and processing. Its birth to the image processing industry has brought a revolution.

                        Later, it was discovered that a kind of processing chip in the computer system can be used as digital camera sensitive sensors or CMOS, featuring mass production and low-cost that is businessmen pursuit. Industry analysis believes that it in the near future may replace CCD, but now they still coexist. Many people believe that: "Intelligent sensors, particularly CCD, is the extremely core components, is the heart of digital cameras. "This is not true: Intelligent sensor, or CCD, its function is to capture light and converted them to electronic signals through lens, CCD is not so much the heart, as it is eyes for the cameras. In researching cameras, the CCD or CMOS sensor photosensitive though is a very important component, determine a large extent the pixel camera, However, CCD / CMOS chip do not take the dominant position of the cost, the more sophisticated areas, the more prominent this character.

                        From a view of technical point, CCD and CMOS have four different aspects:

                        1. Data readout method

                        The charge stored by CCD charge-coupled device, need the control of synchronous signal to read after being translated. Charge transfer and information read and output need work with clock control circuit and three different power resources. The whole circuit is much more complex. CMOS photoelectric sensors directly generated electronic signal after conversion, the signal is very simple to read.

                        2. Speed
                        CCD charge-coupled device output the information under the control of clock control circuit; the speed of output is slow. While the CMOS can capture the signal and output it at the same time, process the image data of each unit in the meanwhile. Of course, the speed is faster than CCD’s.
                        3. Power source and electricity consumption
                        CCD needs three power sources to support its work; the consumption of electricity is serious. CMOS only need one power source and the consumption is small, maybe equivalent to 1/8 to 1/10 of CCD. Therefore, CMOS has a real advantage in saving energy.

                        4. Image quality
                        Because CCD is begin made in early days, its technology is maturity, and adopt PN or SiO2 to reduce the noise, so the image quality is better than CMOS. But in recent years, with the development of the noise eliminating technology, CMOS will get much better image quality.

                        Besides, the internal and external structures of them are different.
                        1. The internal structure (itself structure)
                        The each image point of CCD consists of one Photodiodes and one charge storage zoon next to charge storage and under its control. Photodiodes convert the photons into electron and the relationship between the numbers of electron and intensity of light is direct ratio, when read these charge, the data moved into the ISA Server. The image generated from this structure has the merits of low noise and high function, but need clock signal and Technology for Deflective Pressure to produce CCD, so that the whole system is complex , increase the consumption of electricity and cost.

                        CMOS’s electronic components can be integrated at the one process period, such as Digital Logic Circuit, Clock Driver and the ADC. It likes storage and each image point includes one Photodiodes, one charge or voltages convert unit, one reset and others. It can read the signal by simple X-Y addressing technology,

                        2.external structure (the application of the products)
                        CCD charge-coupled device output the information under the control of clock control circuit; the speed of output is slow. While the CMOS can capture the signal and output it at the same time, process the image data of each unit in the meanwhile. Of course, the speed is faster than CCD’s.

                        CMOS can combine all of components of digital camera into one chip, including photosensitive element, picture amplifier, signal readout circuit, image signal processor and controller and among others. Only one chip can carry out many functions, so the whole cost of it is low.


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                        • #13
                          .

                          BAC5point2,

                          You did notice in the link in post #1 you linked to a auction in which the VIEWING ANGLE is only 30 ~ 40 degrees ?

                          Someone correct me if I'm wrong but I would think 90 degrees would be much better for a back-up cam!!!


                          .

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                          • #14
                            Yea, I just noticed that.

                            I'll definitely have to try out the camera before drilling any holes then.

                            What do I do for power for this thing? It's got a wierd connector for 12vdc. I'd have imagined that I would need to ground the camera as well as apply 12v. There were zero instructions with the camera.

                            Since the specs of the camera I got aren't listed, I don't know what the viewing angle of the camera is. Does anyone have any information on a camera that has a MUCH wider angle and is maybe a little smaller? I don't want to spend a fortune though.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BAC5point2 View Post
                              Yea, I just noticed that.

                              I'll definitely have to try out the camera before drilling any holes then.

                              What do I do for power for this thing? It's got a wierd connector for 12vdc. I'd have imagined that I would need to ground the camera as well as apply 12v. There were zero instructions with the camera.

                              Since the specs of the camera I got aren't listed, I don't know what the viewing angle of the camera is. Does anyone have any information on a camera that has a MUCH wider angle and is maybe a little smaller? I don't want to spend a fortune though.
                              If it is the same as the one I bought (looks similar to the picture, but can't really tell), the yellow connector on the camera needs a barrel connector. If you look closely at it, it should have a dot with a circle around it, with indications which is positive and which is negative. Radio Shack should have the right size barrel connector.

                              Kirk

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