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Inout Circuit Does anybody know of this

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  • Inout Circuit Does anybody know of this

    Hi I stumbled on this http://www.arduino.cc/en/

    Seems interesting as it's open source and available for every system Win, Mac and Linux

    Further they've got RS, USB and are in the process of releasing a BT unit

    Sounds nice I'm investing some time into it

    If someone can tell me some of his expereinces interests me highly

    Thanks

    PS Haven't found anything of it on the site, funny because it's USB and doesn't break the bank !!

  • #2
    Not too bad. Gives you a programmer, compiler, bootloader, and C-like language for an Atmel uC. Language looks simple, so assuming the software works well, should allow rapid prototyping.
    MII-12000 / Ampie / Lilliput 7" / BU-355 / PicoPSU / uSDC
    Currently: Enjoying the setup, but always contemplating my next move...

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    • #3
      im no programmer but 30 bucks for an i/o board how can u go wrong
      .______
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      [(o)______(o)]b VanPimpin'

      LostReceptions Apps D/L Here

      GPSGasoline- Rewriting

      Draw- SkribblePad for Touchscreens

      iGQwerty-iG3.0 Qwerty Keyboard

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      • #4
        the language looks easy enough, I wonder if we could use this as a USB relay driver?

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        • #5
          On the PC side, its kind of hard to tell how it will work. Looks like it can communicate to Flash, so I assume VB will handle it as well. On the hardware side its an Atmel chip, similar to a PIC. To run a relay will take a little extra hardware, but doesnt seem out of the question at all.
          MII-12000 / Ampie / Lilliput 7" / BU-355 / PicoPSU / uSDC
          Currently: Enjoying the setup, but always contemplating my next move...

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          • #6
            I was thinking:
            wire transistors to the digital outputs, then have the transistor array drive the relays. I don't have a clue about the software

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            • #7
              Definately, the hardware will work. Just need someone with a little free time to buy one and see how easy it will be to interface with USB in realtime...
              MII-12000 / Ampie / Lilliput 7" / BU-355 / PicoPSU / uSDC
              Currently: Enjoying the setup, but always contemplating my next move...

              Comment


              • #8
                Are you guys still looking for a usb I/O board? Once I finish up a few projects I'm working on I will look into it.

                I know there are new pics on the market that can handle usb comunications so I will look into those as they are relatively in expensive.

                Also on the site you linked to it looks like they are working on a usb model as well.

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                • #9
                  PICs expensive? As long as you only want 5 at a time, any PIC is free

                  There's been an old PIC16 on the market for a while with USB, but I've never really seen how its supported on the PC side. The hardware wouldnt be bad for me, but I just dont know how the drivers are handled to get it into VB or VC++.
                  MII-12000 / Ampie / Lilliput 7" / BU-355 / PicoPSU / uSDC
                  Currently: Enjoying the setup, but always contemplating my next move...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hey everyone, I just picked one of these up, and it is to cool!!!!


                    One really cool thing that the Arduino Board does is that you program it using a language similar to basic, then it is a standalone piece of equipment. It doesn’t have to be connected to the computer to process the code. This is one of the requirements that I wanted beyond a basic relay card. With this thing you program it and it processes the code on its own.

                    The best part is that it is all open-source! The source code for the processor, schematics, and even the programming language are all available on the web site.

                    Here is the pin-out from the Arduino web site “

                    Starting clockwise from the top center:
                    • Analog Reference pin (orange)
                    • Digital Ground (light green)
                    • Digital Pins 2-13 (green)
                    • Digital Pins 0-1/Serial In/Out - TX/RX (dark green) - These pins cannot be used for digital i/o (digitalRead and digitalWrite) if you are also using serial communication (e.g. Serial.begin).
                    • Reset Button - S1 (dark blue)
                    • In-circuit Serial Programmer (blue-green)
                    • Analog In Pins 0-5 (light blue)
                    • Power and Ground Pins (power: orange, grounds: light orange)
                    • External Power Supply In (9-12VDC) - X1 (pink)
                    • Toggles External Power and USB Power (place jumper on two pins closest to desired supply) - SV1 (purple)
                    • USB (used for uploading sketches to the board and for serial communication between the board and the computer; can be used to power the board) (yellow)

                    I got my board from www.sparkfun.com for about $50 along with some other items. Check it out. :-)
                    VIA MII 10000 - 512MB Ram - Dual 2.5" drives, Xenarc 700TSV, Panasonic CW-8132-B, Opus 150, Audigy 2 NX, PowerMate, IOADR1610 10 Relay card

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