Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dell Hell

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dell Hell

    Beware for those of you about to try this at home....
    This project still hasn't been completed and may never be and this post should only be used as a warning to the possible chaos which may occur by opening up your Dell 600m Inspiron.

    Goal Of project: Extend the laptop's LCD connector cable in such a way that I would be able to mount the original display on a pivot to my dash and keep motherboard and drives underneath the passenger seat.

    Due to classwork in college this project was attempted over a series of days
    Day 1: Dell Inspiron 600m laptop is completely disassembled with the exception of the lcd case. This reveals a shielded cord running to a pin out containing about 50 or so connections. Uh oh...

    Day 2: LCD case is disassembled to reveal the shielded wire connection is actually composed of 25 wires. 12 (brown) run to the inverter which controls backlight, brightness, and contrast (I'm assuming). 4 green run to the top of the screen (assuming power for signal) and another 9 (blue) run parallel to the green to the top of the monitor (most likely signal). What a relief that it wasn't the 50 or so pins we saw on the first end!

    Day 3: After obtaining a highly shielded printer/serial cable from undisclosed sources, the stripping and soldering began. The extention was performed one wire at a time so nothing would get mixed up or crossed, and the colors of the serial cable wires were documented.

    2 hours later: After plugging it back in the laptop does not turn completely on and crashes after about 10 seconds. Luckily it still works when the cable is unplugged. We ponder where this short occured for the next 2 hours.

    2 hours later: After redocumenting our wiring and checking a few possible flaws with no success, we cut cables once more and pay a little bit more attention to our stripping of these tiny wires.

    10 minutes later: We find our problem. The following list is the layering pattern of the 9 blue wires of the monitor connection:

    blue housing (outside)
    copper layer acting as shielding and ground
    strands of small wire acting as shielding and ground
    AND IN THE VERY MIDDLE
    two absolutely TINY wires (white and pink housing) in which there are barely visible signal wires.

    We realized that in our first round of soldering, we basically soldered these two connections and the ground all together. This is what created the short/crash.

    Given that these are ridiculously small we know soldering is possible but the signal loss and resistance after the extension is unknown. The continuation of this project has not been decided on....

    I may put up pictures if I can ever get some... I may need a magnifying glass to show you guys.

    ~nordicskiah

  • #2
    Originally posted by nordicskiah View Post
    Beware for those of you about to try this at home....
    This project still hasn't been completed and may never be and this post should only be used as a warning to the possible chaos which may occur by opening up your Dell 600m Inspiron.

    Goal Of project: Extend the laptop's LCD connector cable in such a way that I would be able to mount the original display on a pivot to my dash and keep motherboard and drives underneath the passenger seat.

    Due to classwork in college this project was attempted over a series of days
    Day 1: Dell Inspiron 600m laptop is completely disassembled with the exception of the lcd case. This reveals a shielded cord running to a pin out containing about 50 or so connections. Uh oh...

    Day 2: LCD case is disassembled to reveal the shielded wire connection is actually composed of 25 wires. 12 (brown) run to the inverter which controls backlight, brightness, and contrast (I'm assuming). 4 green run to the top of the screen (assuming power for signal) and another 9 (blue) run parallel to the green to the top of the monitor (most likely signal). What a relief that it wasn't the 50 or so pins we saw on the first end!

    Day 3: After obtaining a highly shielded printer/serial cable from undisclosed sources, the stripping and soldering began. The extention was performed one wire at a time so nothing would get mixed up or crossed, and the colors of the serial cable wires were documented.

    2 hours later: After plugging it back in the laptop does not turn completely on and crashes after about 10 seconds. Luckily it still works when the cable is unplugged. We ponder where this short occured for the next 2 hours.

    2 hours later: After redocumenting our wiring and checking a few possible flaws with no success, we cut cables once more and pay a little bit more attention to our stripping of these tiny wires.

    10 minutes later: We find our problem. The following list is the layering pattern of the 9 blue wires of the monitor connection:

    blue housing (outside)
    copper layer acting as shielding and ground
    strands of small wire acting as shielding and ground
    AND IN THE VERY MIDDLE
    two absolutely TINY wires (white and pink housing) in which there are barely visible signal wires.

    We realized that in our first round of soldering, we basically soldered these two connections and the ground all together. This is what created the short/crash.

    Given that these are ridiculously small we know soldering is possible but the signal loss and resistance after the extension is unknown. The continuation of this project has not been decided on....

    I may put up pictures if I can ever get some... I may need a magnifying glass to show you guys.

    ~nordicskiah
    Can you solder directly to the pcb ? Would seem easier then soldering those strands of wires ( which I'm guessing are coated in a plastic )

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by kevinlekiller View Post
      Can you solder directly to the pcb ? Would seem easier then soldering those strands of wires ( which I'm guessing are coated in a plastic )
      That'll be my last resort, for now I'd rather leave the original connectors intact so I don't have a semi-permanently connected monitor. I suck at welding too and have been leaving most of it to my roomate

      Comment


      • #4
        Any update on this? I'm about to start hacking my Inspiron 5100 cable, which looks do-able.

        Comment

        Working...
        X