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800x480 : Solution for Intel graphics

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  • 800x480 : Solution for Intel graphics

    Hey, I just wanted to share something I stumbled upon regarding that elusive resolution. I recently bought a Jetway J9F2 which has the 945GM chipset and I already had single PCI slot taken up by my sound card. I really wanted to try to get this resolution working and came upon another thread that I suppose has grown cold.

    I wanted to share what I found though which has worked for me and should work for other Intel graphics chipset users out there. Maybe someone can try with another chipset and report what works.

    [Disclaimer: As with anything that modifies your registry, this could potentially damage your system. I take no responsibility, so follow along at your own risk.]

    Here is the link to the instructions I used, but I'll note my experience to help others more specifically trying to do what I did, which is load 800x480 on my 7" Xenarc display.

    http://softwarecommunity.intel.com/i.../30244730.aspx

    The instructions show you how to use a tool called DTDCalculator in order to write the proper information into your registry to allow your graphics drivers to output custom resolutions.

    Follow the steps as outlined in the instructions above, but while you are doing that, note that our Xenarc screens (probably the Lilli's too) do not output EDID information which the instructions asks you to look for. So, don't bother with Moninf. Instead, what I did was manually enter in all the information listed on Xenarc's website regarding modeline settings for Xf86.

    Here
    Modeline "800x480" 31.746 800 860 940 1000 480 508 511 525 -hsync -vsync

    or

    Modeline "800x480" 38.55 800 832 976 1032 480 489 495 613 -hsync -vsync


    Each number corresponds left to right on the list to the top to bottom fields in the program. I'll illustrate:




    You then go ahead and proceed to follow the instructions provided once you have the calculated DTD.

    A word before you go and do this. 1) It was nice to have the DTDCalculator shortcut on my desktop since things were really off for me the first time I rebooted. Once I tweaked everything I was good. 2) I was only able to pull up 800x480 through the List All Modes button under Adapter properties:




    3) I haven't been able to figure out how to get all modes working. When I did mine, it set the timings for the monitor permanently. I was able to change resolutions, but in order to see the rest of the screen, I'd have to push over with my mouse on the edges of the monitor. Maybe with some creative thinking we can figure this out. Not the biggest problem though since personally I don't think I'll be changing the resolutions, but it's always nice to have full functionality if you can.

    If you screw up and want things back to normal, just delete the DTD you created by clicking the Less button in DTDCalculator, write to registry and reboot.

    Let me know how this works out for you guys. I managed to get it working on my regular monitor since I'm still bench testing my system. Hopefully it works just as well with the screens we're using.

  • #2
    There was another thread on a similar topic but it got all confusing...

    Anyways, here is the DTD string I used to get 800X480 on the Lilliput 619:

    4C 1D 20 FC 30 E0 14 10 20 38 37 00 00 00 00 00 00 1E

    The first numbers are the refresh rate and I fiddled with that.

    I also have posted a driver for 800X480 for Intel G965 series onboard graphics w/ this Lilli in the other thread.
    2006 Lancer Evolution IX MR In-Dash PC Project - WIP

    Planning:
    [----------] 100%
    Purchasing:
    [----------] 90%
    Installation/Fab/Assembly (Revised v2):
    [----------] 90%

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    • #3
      I'm taking a look at the IEGD utilities to create a package. Am I wrong to assume that hacking the registry will provide the OS with only one custom timing? Can this be alleviated by using the package builder to add in all the standard timings, plus the 800x480? My biggest problem with the DTDCalculator program is that it adds the DTD but then screws up my other resolutions. I read into the article as being that you can't add 800x600 since that is already listed, but if my timings are messed up, then what's the point of using that res... or one slightly off by 8 pixels?

      Dunno... more reading to do I guess.

      Comment


      • #4
        That DTD timing is for the case when the EDID info cannot be read from the screen. If Windows gets EDID info, it will ignore your DTD settings completely. Xenarcs and Liilis don't output EDID info, though...so here we are.

        You can still switch to the standard resolutions. In fact, you have to go to "List all modes" to get the 800X480 (on my system).

        The package builder is nice and I used it to build mine initially before tweaking out on it. It has an easy GUI if you read the docs.

        You should be able to use the 800X600 as-is with both Xenarcs and Liilis. I don't see why you need to mess with that one...

        Maybe we should do a writeup on building a driver...
        2006 Lancer Evolution IX MR In-Dash PC Project - WIP

        Planning:
        [----------] 100%
        Purchasing:
        [----------] 90%
        Installation/Fab/Assembly (Revised v2):
        [----------] 90%

        Comment


        • #5
          IMPORTANT NOTE:

          Using the Intel embedded drivers will almost certainly disable the OS's ability to enter hibernation or standby. Embedded systems are usually store on ROM and simply do a hard-off when shutting down. On my system (using this driver) I must do a full boot every time I start the car.
          2006 Lancer Evolution IX MR In-Dash PC Project - WIP

          Planning:
          [----------] 100%
          Purchasing:
          [----------] 90%
          Installation/Fab/Assembly (Revised v2):
          [----------] 90%

          Comment


          • #6
            Hmmm, yeah that's not nice at all. I have my DSATX set to pulse the system into standby when I shut the car off. I guess I'll try to work around it if I can. Thanks.

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            • #7
              In Windows you can configure that pulse to simply shut the system down.
              2006 Lancer Evolution IX MR In-Dash PC Project - WIP

              Planning:
              [----------] 100%
              Purchasing:
              [----------] 90%
              Installation/Fab/Assembly (Revised v2):
              [----------] 90%

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, but I'm not a fan of shutting it down Kind of a deal breaker I guess. With this new board I got it's not as big an issue as with the old one. This one doesn't have RAID drivers which just ****ed me off. I couldn't stand waiting for RAID to detect my hard drives for no reason. This board boots faster but still not fast enough for my impatient self.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Oh well. If it's too slow it's too slow

                  How long does your system take to cold start? Have you tried optimizations?
                  2006 Lancer Evolution IX MR In-Dash PC Project - WIP

                  Planning:
                  [----------] 100%
                  Purchasing:
                  [----------] 90%
                  Installation/Fab/Assembly (Revised v2):
                  [----------] 90%

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I haven't timed it. The system itself boots up pretty quickly, but then Windows wants to chill and think for a bit about life before it starts up so I'm sure I could shave a few seconds. Probably takes me 20 seconds to cold boot into Windows. Then another five seconds for startup items (RR) to load up and start playing music. This is a guess. Where as standby is a three second process more like what starting a car stereo is like.

                    My only gripe with n-Lite to help reduce overhead and such is that undoubtedly I'll disable a non-essential service or component that will be required down the road when I try to implement something I hadn't any idea existed. And then I'll have to deal with re-enabling things which could depend on other things I disabled and it spirals out of control. Sometimes keeping it simple is the best option. So I use n-Lite now only for adding disk drivers and service packs and unattended installs but leave everything in place since I can easily tweak the look and feel through registry hacks and keep myself out of trouble.

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                    • #11
                      Well you do have to sacrifice for speed. I think you could probably get it down quite a bit, but that is up to you.

                      If you can get the regular Intel driver to work with the .inf file mod, then you can retain your hibernate ability. It is only the embedded driver that has this drawback.
                      2006 Lancer Evolution IX MR In-Dash PC Project - WIP

                      Planning:
                      [----------] 100%
                      Purchasing:
                      [----------] 90%
                      Installation/Fab/Assembly (Revised v2):
                      [----------] 90%

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Does anyone has the DTD string for the Lilliput 629? I have upgrade my carpc to a Jetway J9F2-KHDE motherboard recently and now I can't use enable 800X480 anymore. I've looked into the DTD calculator approach, but I can't find the specs of the Lilliput 629 anywhere since I don't have the users guide and the Lilliput website doesn't provide the technical specification required by the DTD Calculator software to generate the new display resolution... hopefully someone with a similar setup can help!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Try the DTD string I posted above for the 619. The first two numbers are the refresh rate and you may have to mess with them. To figure out how to do that, read the Intel instructions linked in this thread.
                          2006 Lancer Evolution IX MR In-Dash PC Project - WIP

                          Planning:
                          [----------] 100%
                          Purchasing:
                          [----------] 90%
                          Installation/Fab/Assembly (Revised v2):
                          [----------] 90%

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Here's how it worked for me, for the 945 Intel mobile graphics and for a Lilliput 629 monitor.

                            - Install a display driver that does not already contain a 800x480 resolution. I just took the latest regular driver from the Intel site.

                            - Run DTD Calculator, and see if the two buttons in Registry Hack are active.

                            - In the Calculation tab, select the standard timing 720x480.

                            - In the Registry Hack tab, press More if needed, press Get Calculated, press Create Modeline, press write DTDs to registry. Reboot.

                            - Display properties, click to show all modes, select the 720x480 driver and see if it displays ok. You have now established the ability to add new resolutions with DTD Calculator.

                            - Run DTD Calculator again.

                            - Start with the 720x480 template in the Calculation tab, change the five most top left values to: 29.5 (MhZ), 800, 816, 880. 936. (It's everything 80 pixels more than before and a bit higher clock to get 60 Hz).

                            - Repeat the rest of the procedure with the new 800x480 resolution.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JuniorGeezer View Post
                              Here's how it worked for me, for the 945 Intel mobile graphics and for a Lilliput 629 monitor.

                              - Install a display driver that does not already contain a 800x480 resolution. I just took the latest regular driver from the Intel site.

                              - Run DTD Calculator, and see if the two buttons in Registry Hack are active.

                              - In the Calculation tab, select the standard timing 720x480.

                              - In the Registry Hack tab, press More if needed, press Get Calculated, press Create Modeline, press write DTDs to registry. Reboot.

                              - Display properties, click to show all modes, select the 720x480 driver and see if it displays ok. You have now established the ability to add new resolutions with DTD Calculator.

                              - Run DTD Calculator again.

                              - Start with the 720x480 template in the Calculation tab, change the five most top left values to: 29.5 (MhZ), 800, 816, 880. 936. (It's everything 80 pixels more than before and a bit higher clock to get 60 Hz).

                              - Repeat the rest of the procedure with the new 800x480 resolution.
                              Thanks Geezer, I'll give this a try!

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