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Wiring Connectors from Battery to M2-ATX

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  • Wiring Connectors from Battery to M2-ATX

    Hi All

    Really sorry to start of with such a newbie style question, but we all gotta start somewhere. Im hoping to get my new car soon (Golf/Rabbit) and i plan to install an ITX based machine, my first car puter. I have used ITX in the home for years and have lost count of the number ive built, this will be my first into a car.

    So start at the ground and working up, i figure power lines are a must. From reading 4 or 8 gauge from the battery into the boot (trunk for you americans) which will connect to the M2 and the ITX/Monitor so my question is what are the best types of connectors to use for:

    1. Connecting the wire to the battery
    2. Connecting the other end of the wire in step 1 to the wires you get with the M2 that have the connectors already on which connect to the jumpers of the M2 psu.

    As i have read its best to fuse this power line so best to fuse it towards the battery end of the wire with an inline fuse holder i guess?

    Im struggling to think of the actual names to search for and work alot better with pictures! I know its really basic and a silly question but i need some help!

    Thanks, Scott

  • #2
    Ah ha, it seems, 4 years ago when i joined here i asked very similar questions. And reading again what i didnt understand there for point 1 would i be right in thinking something like this and then screw the wire into the bottom of that?

    http://www.thetoolboxshop.com/ekmps/...ive-1006-p.jpg

    For point 2 what concerns me is the wire above, directly from the battery is really thick and im unsure of how that connects to the relatively thin wire you get with the M2. Direct connection just seems unsafe?

    Scott

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, fuse it right off the battery with an inline is usually the best option IMO. I'm unsure as to the gauge to amps rating, but there's a generalized graph in the FAQ somewhere for this I think. But here's another decent reference. I think I went with 8 gauge, and it can do 40amps, but IMO you should always go lower with the fuse, so I went with a 30. I think 10gauge is fine for 30, but again, I'd probably put a 25 or lower in for it just in case.

      1. I just used a standard battery tap you can get at any auto store really, 1/4inch washer type that you remove the holding screw on the existing battery cable, slide on, then screw back down. I actually soldered the cable to the tap, as I don't trust crimp-ons for anything, but that's just me.

      2. The ends for the positive you can either just crimp, or solder with heat-shrink tubing. And of course the same for the ACC lead going to the M2 that you will need to run. Grounding should be as short as possible with the best metal to metal contact you can provide in the place your mounting it.

      This is what your working with for the M2. You can run as thick a wire as you want TO the M2's positive lead, the cable it uses for it's 160watt draw is fine as it's not going to pull more than it needs on the thinner line. You can always fuse the actual drawn connection the M2 uses as well, as if it were me I would probably put a distribution block (fused) back there anyhow, rather than directly connecting. But you should as a definite have a fused connection as close to the actual tap as possible, this isn't something you wanna skip.
      2008 Ford Mustang GT/CS CARPC(99%)
      Software: Ride/Road-Runner, Digital FX skin 5.x, iGuidance 2011, GPSgate on Win7 64bit

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi

        Thanks for the reply. Now that you gave me a few more key words i googled "Car Battery Tap" and found a video on YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1zH020tVpk cheesy guy, but i think that covers excatly what i need?) that shows you (using an inline fuse) how to connect to the battery via a Ring Connector which seems to be similar to what you did?

        As for connecting to the M2, directly crimping the wires will be fine, no risk of melting or anything?

        Scott

        Comment


        • #5
          Just looking at the picture, I think it's using 12gauge wire, not sure as to strand count, but it's 160watts, so 160 divided by 13.8v is 11.6 amps that it should use; so 12gauge should be fine. Again, if the gauge wire is concern for you for the M2 you can always just put another inline on it a the junction point, say a 15 amp. And shorten the lead as much as your comfortable with to reduce the resistance. Another point, if your going the crimp method, a major mistake made is to use the crimp itself as the conductor between the two pieces. The crimp itself should just be holding the two connections one on top of the other. I have seen some shoddy work done where the plastic of the actual tube crimp melted because they only had a slight bit of the wire on each end and crimped down the ends separately. They're not made to pass through the current used, just to hold the wires together giving as much contact as possible.

          Can't actually view Youtube here at work, but yes, that was what I was referring to, a ring connector tap. You shouldn't need to replace the actual car's battery tap unless you're going with 6gauge or lower.
          2008 Ford Mustang GT/CS CARPC(99%)
          Software: Ride/Road-Runner, Digital FX skin 5.x, iGuidance 2011, GPSgate on Win7 64bit

          Comment


          • #6
            HI

            Thanks again for the re-read the edits and its becoming clearer. Being a wiring noob im just thinking thick cable to thin cable just wont work, but as you say it will only draw what it needs.

            So if i have this right (Distribution blocks seems to be the way to go) i would free this crude wiring:

            Battery > 8-guage > 30amp inline Fuse > 8-guage > Distribution Block (1in4out) > 8/10 Guage > 10amp (?) inline fuse > M2 Connector Wire > M2 PSU

            Does that sound about right? That would leave me with 3 of the 4 outputs from the dist block to use for powering other devices at a later date?

            Scott

            Comment


            • #7
              Not sure if I get the diagram, but it would be:

              Battery to inline fuse(30amp), to trunk distro block(using one 15amp fuse, link put here as an example of one), to the M2. I think you mention a 10amp one for that, you'd be replacing it a lot, as the M2 should have a peak draw of around 12amps.

              The distro block should house the 8gauge line your running to the trunk from the battery with the inline fuse attached to the tap point of the battery. Then the M2's lead can just be screwed into place on the distro block.
              2008 Ford Mustang GT/CS CARPC(99%)
              Software: Ride/Road-Runner, Digital FX skin 5.x, iGuidance 2011, GPSgate on Win7 64bit

              Comment


              • #8
                Read your edit, and regarding crimping i was presuming a use of similar to these:

                http://www.questwww.com/mike/Large%2...s%20(grey).JPG

                Scott

                Edit: I see what your 'diagram' shows and i meant something similar i just added in the wires between the items to make it clearer for me! The Distribution Block you linked actually has a fuse in in, the one i googled didnt so it makes sense to get one with it in, less connections i guess!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Wayne613 View Post
                  The distro block should house the 8gauge line your running to the trunk from the battery with the inline fuse attached to the tap point of the battery. Then the M2's lead can just be screwed into place on the distro block.
                  That's the one that made the penny Drop. I found a 1 to 2 distribution block on ebay that accepts fuses from 5 to 60 amps, so that would be fine to slot in a 15amp fuse between that and the M2 for extra protection.

                  Nice one, thanks for your advice

                  Scott

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    For the inline fuse to the 8gauge off the battery, and any other power to power crimp connection you might need, you'd want these or these. In the right gauge of course.
                    2008 Ford Mustang GT/CS CARPC(99%)
                    Software: Ride/Road-Runner, Digital FX skin 5.x, iGuidance 2011, GPSgate on Win7 64bit

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wayne613 View Post
                      For the inline fuse to the 8gauge off the battery, and any other power to power crimp connection you might need, you'd want these or these. In the right gauge of course.
                      Thanks for the links, pictures mean more than 1000 words to me!

                      Scott

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        No problem. Your also of course want to get a decent amount of zip ties to hold things in place especially up in the engine compartment, which you've probably already thought of, but I just thought I'd mention it.
                        2008 Ford Mustang GT/CS CARPC(99%)
                        Software: Ride/Road-Runner, Digital FX skin 5.x, iGuidance 2011, GPSgate on Win7 64bit

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I didnt actually think of it, but i have tons of them. Im a neat freak

                          Im just looking around for the wire now, seems you have to pay to get decent stuff. I presumed it was all just the same! lol

                          Scott

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            And for Pete's sake - disconnect the ground (-ve) battery terminal before working with the +ve!

                            Sometime I find websources unbelievable in their omissions (deliberate or otherwise). (IE - utube cheesy guy.)


                            As for cable sizing, I use resistance. IE - known current load; known length; decide max voltage drop (eg 0.5V) where V=IR = current times resistance_per_length times length.

                            And yes - fuse or circuit breaker to protect the cable from the battery. Hence fuse/breaker rating must not exceed cable rating.


                            PS - I love the Projecta satin forged terminals like:

                            as per 4-2G & 0-00G.
                            They are only ~$10 here - not that that matters any longer - after finally finding them I changed to "flink on battery terminal" boxes!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for the extra advice, i did look into working with electrics on the car and i did make a note to disconnect the negative first

                              As i dont have the car yet im unsure what connections will be available on the battery, if im lucky it might already have something suitable!

                              Scott

                              Edit: While im thinking about it, depending what screen i get (it wil be touchscreen) am i better running that off the Battery Direct, the Distribution Box (if that how does it control on/off automatically) or somehow running it off the M2?

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