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  • Cold and Heat?

    Would the cold and heat have any effect on hard drive or other components in a mini computer? I'm advanced in computers, but I am a newbie when it comes to car computers. I would think that if you're using it in the winter, which is like right now, the drives would freeze overnight or if sitting for a long time.... What do some of the more experienced people here think?

    Also one of my cars is a Hatchback Civic and could I potentially just install a regular computer in there? Is the reason for "mini" computers space, or is it power or what? If the issue is power, could I just run a line from the battery or alternator to another battery in the back? If someone knows of a site that details this it would be appreciated as I don't know a lot about cars.

    Thanks in advance!

    Jesse

  • #2
    How exactelly could your drive freeze? There is nothing inside of them that will freeze at any temp they would ever see....
    And if you can find the space I would just use a MircoATX board... they are a lot cheaper than really tiny ITX boards.

    As far as the battery thing goes... seems like you would just be able to run another one off of the original battery but i'm trying to find out for sure myself.
    SpudFiles

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    • #3
      Well, to the contrary, the newer technology end of the hard drive use FDR (Fluid Dynamic Bearrings (SP?)). Not sure, but they are rated 5 Deg Celsius and up. Though, from previous posts, it seems like users in more colder area's currently don't have problems, and users who already went thru the winter problems seem to still have working drives, so its not that big of an issue.
      Mark

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      • #4
        Not good for computer components though, they are not designed for extreme weather. For this reason I just installed a removable drive bay for my HDD.

        Just makin' 'em last.
        Tidder

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        • #5
          I've had a drive freeze, though a long long time ago when I was a field tech and was too lazy to pull drives out of my car at night. 0 degrees F. Plugged the drive in and instead of hearing that nice spin up sound I'd get a loud clunk. About 50% of the time the drive would work after thawing, other times I was SOL. But this was about 5 years ago, I think drives have come a long way since.

          However I will be using a compact flash card coupled with a USB 2.0 external case for my HD. I plan on removing the HD on cold days.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by edrock200
            However I will be using a compact flash card coupled with a USB 2.0 external case for my HD. I plan on removing the HD on cold days.
            That's my setup almost exactly. I used an 800mb SimpleTech solid state drive, and usb 2.0 to ide adapter with removable drive bay.
            Tidder

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            • #7
              I don't see how you guys have hard drives dieing the in cold... what do you think every notebook user does when it's cold outside? I have had hard drives starting up and running in well below 0 and over 100 before...
              SpudFiles

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              • #8
                Who do you know that's retarded enough to leave their laptop outside in below freezing weather?
                Tidder

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by edrock200
                  I've had a drive freeze, though a long long time ago when I was a field tech and was too lazy to pull drives out of my car at night. 0 degrees F. Plugged the drive in and instead of hearing that nice spin up sound I'd get a loud clunk. About 50% of the time the drive would work after thawing, other times I was SOL. But this was about 5 years ago, I think drives have come a long way since.

                  However I will be using a compact flash card coupled with a USB 2.0 external case for my HD. I plan on removing the HD on cold days.
                  Hard drives don't freeze. The metal will expand and contract with extreme weather but it isn't going to freeze. There just isn't enough liquid anything in a hard drive to have them freeze up.
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tidder
                    Who do you know that's retarded enough to leave their laptop outside in below freezing weather?
                    You must have not worked tech support before. There are plenty of retarded people who unthikable thinks. I have plenty of stories of people who have done much worse.
                    *shudders*
                    AMD XP 2600+/512MB RAM/120GB hard drive
                    Opus 150W/DVD/GPS/7" Lilliput TS/802.11g/Bluetooth
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by brady
                      Hard drives don't freeze. The metal will expand and contract with extreme weather but it isn't going to freeze. There just isn't enough liquid anything in a hard drive to have them freeze up.
                      Hard drives with fluid dynamic bearing spindles make use of a thin layer of some type of liquid lubricant between the shaft and the spindle in the drive. Most lubricants become more viscous as temperatures decrease, so at some point the lubricant will no longer function properly.
                      System status: in progress

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                      • #12
                        Yes at some point it won't work anymore... but most places where you would leave a computer outside for an extended ammount of time woulden't be below 0 or so...
                        SpudFiles

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by raptorsoft2000
                          If the issue is power, could I just run a line from the battery or alternator to another battery in the back?
                          The idea is right, but it needs a bit of work so you don't bugger up your batteries

                          http://www.talkaudio.co.uk/vbb/showthread.php?t=54203
                          Leo

                          http://www.talkaudio.co.uk

                          A million people can't be wrong, right?

                          Well... unless they're all from the red states...

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                          • #14
                            Do some more reading on heat and cold.

                            The short answer is cold only slows the spin on Fluid bearing drives and the responce rate on LCD displays.

                            Cold other than mentioned above does not change how a PC works. Heat is a different issue.
                            TruckinMP3
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by brady
                              Hard drives don't freeze. The metal will expand and contract with extreme weather but it isn't going to freeze. There just isn't enough liquid anything in a hard drive to have them freeze up.
                              There's really no reason for me to lie about this. Like I said as a field tech I would leave HD's in my car because I was young, lazy and dumb. Overnight, when it was freezing out, a good portion of these hard drives wouldn't spin up or read properly if I didn't allow them to gradually come back to room temp before plugging them in. But whatever, it's your money not mine.

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