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  • HD Partitions

    I have seen this pretty recently on someones site. I have done a search for this same topic, but I have had no real luck.

    I want to have 3 partitions on my HD. I want a Win XP partition, a backup partition, and then everything else partition. Can someone help me on what size I should do for the OS and backup partition sizes?

    I plan on having Win Xp, mediacar, destinator, and some dvd programs on the boot partition. Maybe a couple other programs such as office.

  • #2
    A backup partition? You shouldn't back stuff up on the same hard drive. Isn't the purpose of backing stuff up for if the hard drive dies?

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    • #3
      well that is why I have another HD. But, I wanted to make it quick and easy in car backup.

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      • #4
        I personaly suggest the following type setup.
        You can change this as you please depending on your drive size.

        I make a partition of about 10 gigs. This is for you WindowsXP installation. I forgot how much space a base WindowsXP install takes up exactly but you need the little bit of extra space for windows updates and maybee a program or 2 here and there. (anti-virus n other system stuff) Also whenever you download anything off the internet even if you specify another drive, windows ALWAYS downloads to your Windows install parition first, then it moves it where you wanted it saved. So you definately want space for if you download a big file.

        Then you create a partition of about 517-520 MB. This will be used for what windows calls your "Swap File" aka *Virtual Ram*. It is what the system uses when it has used up all your real RAM. Over the years I have come to the conclusion that 512MB is a decent sized swap file for anyone over 256MB of TRUE ram. If you have less than 256MB of real ram you might have to adjust this number and make it higher.
        BTW, make this around 520MB or so cause windows has a fit if you tell it to use 512MB on a 512MB partition, it will say you need at least 5 mb free or something like that.

        Next you create the PROGRAM FILES partition. *I suggest around 25Gigs, depends on what you plan on installing*
        This is the partition you use to install all of your programs on. Not only does it help speed up the computer *this is argueable tho others disagree* but in the event something happens to Windows *which is on its own partition remember* you will still have your program's directories. Whats the point of this you ask? Some programs save all their preferences in their folders. So lets say you have a proggie that you have setup a specific way and usually takes u a little time to get that way, it will have that information still. Some programs you can just run that directory and it will be fine, of course others are picky and you have to reinstall them from scratch, but if you just reinstall to that same directory it will ususally have the same preferences from before your windows died.
        An example of this is STEAM. Which you all know is used for Half-Life, Counter-Strike. etc etc. Don't u hate having to reinstall STEAM, re-enter you username/password , Setup you buttons and key configs again? Well if you keep you install directory you NEVER have to do that again. You can just double click the steam.exe after a reinstall and everything is as you had it before. And for you pickier people who like having the uninstall option, just Reinstall steam as usual, pick the folder where u had steam before and install it over that. Steam will not copy over your old preferences, and it will be just like before.

        Next you create what I call your "Media" Partition *makes this as big as you want*
        This is where all of your mp3's movies, blah blah etc. go.
        I personaly have more than one Media partition for safety purposes. Sometimes you whole hard drive won't die. Just a specific sector. Sometimes when a specific sector goes bad, that whole partition is bad. So instead of having a sector go bad and I lose all my movies, and all my mp3's. I instead would lose just my mp3's only since my movies are on a whole different partition, or vice versa.

        BTW, all this applies to my home computer. A carputer might not need so much space due to what it does (lacks big games like UT2k4 n such) so play around with drive sizes. If you don't need such a big partition for programs shrink it and use more space for media. etc. etc.

        I hope this helps...im tired of typing

        great for my first post on this board tho

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        • #5
          10 gig seems like way overkill for a windows partition if you are doing your program files on a separate partition, windows xp pro takes less than 2.5 gigs.
          EPIA MII-1200, 512 MB Ram, Seagate 7200 RPM 160GB hard drive, Orinoco Gold with 5.5 dB external antenna, Lilliput 7" TS, DVD-ROM, M2-ATX, Rikaline 6010 GPS, Running Frodo Player
          My Truckputer

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          • #6
            depends on you i guess.
            I'm sitting on 3gigs of space free currently.
            Not sure what it is taking up that xtra space. Except basic core programs such as my anti virus, MS office.

            I still suggest 10 gigs tho, I tried 5 gigs at one point in time and it didn't work out. Windows kept running out of space for windows updates, Norton updates whenever i would download something off the net. etc. etc.

            Been using the 10gig base for a long while now tho without issues.

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            • #7
              Well I know when a partition becomes 90% full windows starts to get a bit screwy. I decided on 15 gig. Probably too much, but that is where some programs are going to be including GPS. Some of those maps take up a good amount of space so...

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              • #8
                thanks koolaidkitten, your post was very informative,

                i was wondering how you set the 520mb partition as the "swap file" drive?

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                • #9
                  Easy,
                  If using XP go to your "Control Panel"
                  Double Click "System"
                  go to the "Advanced" Tab
                  Under "Performance" click "Settings" then click it's "Advanced" tab.

                  You should see a section labled "Virtual Memory"
                  Click "Change"

                  In a normal install it should be set to "System Managed Size" on the C: drive.
                  Just change these value to what drive / how much space you want. Be sure to go back and tell it to do No paging file on the C: drive.

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                  • #10
                    I'm using 2HDs in my system...

                    4GB HD with Windows XP+Frontend+GPS+OBDApps
                    20GB with Media files

                    no anti virus, no office, nothing like that in my car... This is an nLite installation of XP, and I have had no problems... I'm sure I'm still using less than 2gb on that disk... nothing takes up so much space... add 550mb or so for hibernation, and I'm still well under the 4gb cabacity...
                    Roy

                    2005 Range Rover 4.4
                    Any ideas for putting a PC in this? :)

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                    • #11
                      from what i was taught in school the swap file should be 1.5 times the size of your physical memory for best proformence. but like i said thats what i was taught and there have been many times i have had to correct a teacher. (wow thats sounds so self important)

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                      • #12
                        Yup thats totally true,....at about the time Windows95 was the dominate operating system. When we were running only 64MB of ram.

                        But then again, people could argue this issue forever...has just about as much controversy as the everlasting Intel/AMD issue.

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                        • #13
                          I know of some companies that do backups on a "hidden" partition. Its not a backup for data(always use another device for data) but a backup for the OS and Apps. Right after a PC is set up for its use with all the apps it will be and put the ghost on a "hidden" partition. In the event there is any problem not HD related the ghost can be restored. Its generally faster to do a disk to disk transfer, plus your not bogging down the network or server.

                          From personal experience I know some of the installs for some workstations can be 7 hours long. Its much faster to restore a ghost.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sevise
                            I know of some companies that do backups on a "hidden" partition. Its not a backup for data(always use another device for data) but a backup for the OS and Apps. Right after a PC is set up for its use with all the apps it will be and put the ghost on a "hidden" partition. In the event there is any problem not HD related the ghost can be restored. Its generally faster to do a disk to disk transfer, plus your not bogging down the network or server.

                            From personal experience I know some of the installs for some workstations can be 7 hours long. Its much faster to restore a ghost.
                            I have made a ghost from my C: (Windows XP setup) on a CDR. I'm currently still in progress, at the moment the ghost file is only 300 Mb in size

                            I used XPLite to get rid of all the unneeded **** from windows XP like Outlook Express, games, dll cache, help files and so on.

                            I also disabled hibernation (saves me 256Mb file), and disabled system restore, and set temp.inet files to 0...

                            My system runs rather fast now, booting in like 30sec, and when i'm on the desktop, only 60Mb ram in use

                            Need to install my car-related apps still, but I hope I can fit my ghost on CD (using high-compression)
                            My Opel Astra 1993 CarPC: http://www.djsmiley.com/projects/carpc/photos/

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                            • #15
                              I partition my drive in 3.

                              1 OS
                              2. DATA
                              3. Backup image (ie Ghost the base OS and one with all apps installed + Drivers)

                              3 is fat32 so I can ghost back the system should it get corrupted or just need cleaning out. the other two are NTFS.

                              However then new system wen it goes in will have two drives.

                              one for OS and one for data.

                              BTW it is recommended that the swap file be placed on a seperate disk to the system disk if more than one disk is installed. ALthough as the second disk will hold all the MP3's and DIVX's it might not be a goos idea, will have to look into that.

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