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Inline fuses, tell me about them

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  • Inline fuses, tell me about them

    Getting close to time for the install, and I have read several things here (and other places) about using a Inline fuse.

    What exactley is this? I hear that its supposed to prevent your car catching on fire in case of a voltage spike.

    I was reading on amp hookups, and how they are used in hooking up amps, but Ive read here that they are used on hooking up inverters also (what I will be using)

    Do I need two if I am running a amp and a inverter?
    2000 Sunfire build 100%, or is it ever really 100%?

  • #2
    They are just fuses that are run inline with the power wire. They preven whatever device or devices you are running from drawing to much current or will prevent the wire from drawing to much current if it shorts against the frame somewhere. You want to use one slightly larger then what you think your current draw is giong to be.
    Visit my website at:
    http://www.hostilejava.com
    http://hostilejava.com/gerbil5.jpg

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    • #3
      Where can I get them and how do they install? Do you connect one end of the wire on one side and the other on the other side?
      2000 Sunfire build 100%, or is it ever really 100%?

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      • #4
        Best place to figure that out is look @ the fuse contained in whatever it is you are running.
        My opus uses a 15 fuse. The amp uses a 25 fuse (btw im a paranoid freak you dont really need all teh fuses i used)
        So as soon as the 12v line leaves my battery I have a 40 fuse which goes to the distro block which I have put 30 fuses on, one goes to the amp, the other side goes down into another 15 fuse before it hits the Opus.

        In my experience adding up the fuse number on your devices on that line will tell you what number inline fuse you should be using.
        I don't know if that is the right logic or not, but it works for me.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by CavityCr33p
          Where can I get them and how do they install? Do you connect one end of the wire on one side and the other on the other side?
          You can get inline fuse holders (and fuses) at Radio Shack, though you can get fancy-schmancy ones at car audio places, but that's overkill. Blade or glass doesn't matter - its personal preference. Connect it inline on the +12v line between the bat'try and the equipment, somewhere convenient.

          Make sure you don't get "slow-blow" fuses (for this application), and get a fuse rating just a bit higher than what your equipment will be using (as another poster stated).

          NB. Fuses are meant to protect
          1. your equipment
          2. your *** (fire bad! hot water burn baby!)
          in the event of a short-circuit.

          Also - if, for example, your equipment should be drawing a total of 40 amps (max), and a 40 amp fuse keeps blowing, don't use a higher-amp rated fuse instead - the fuse is blowing for a reason.

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          • #6
            use the lowest rated fuse possible for the equipment...but you have to make sure the wire itself is rated for higher than the amperage of the fuse.
            rebuilding carpc... kinda..

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            • #7
              Originally posted by koolaidkitten
              In my experience adding up the fuse number on your devices on that line will tell you what number inline fuse you should be using.
              I don't know if that is the right logic or not, but it works for me.
              That's about right. There's no special magic in this instance, not like determining the total capacitance of multiple capacitors connected in series vs. parallel.

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              • #8
                Also someone stated to mount it some place convenient. You can do this, but the recommended spot is as close to the battery as possible. That way if the line shorts it's less likely that the short will occur between the battery and the fuse. If the short does occur between the battery and the fuse, the fuse isn't going to help you.
                Visit my website at:
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by fantomas
                  use the lowest rated fuse possible for the equipment...but you have to make sure the wire itself is rated for higher than the amperage of the fuse.
                  Good point. You don't want to run something like 24 gauge wire with a 30 amp fuse to your amp, only to have the wire overheat and ignite your carpeting!

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                  • #10
                    Awesome! Thanks for all the help guys.

                    http://www.radioshack.com/product.as...ct_id=270-1238

                    So do you just use two leads? one from the battery and one to the amp/inverter? What im trying to say, as by looking at that picture, it looks like it splices 2 leads together, with a fuse in the middle, am I correct on this?
                    2000 Sunfire build 100%, or is it ever really 100%?

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                    • #11
                      That is correct.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CavityCr33p
                        Awesome! Thanks for all the help guys.

                        http://www.radioshack.com/product.as...ct_id=270-1238

                        So do you just use two leads? one from the battery and one to the amp/inverter? What im trying to say, as by looking at that picture, it looks like it splices 2 leads together, with a fuse in the middle, am I correct on this?

                        They are called "in-line" fuses. Therefore they go inline. Imagine a hot wire going from your device to the battery. Cut it. You now have to loose ends. They attach to each end of the in-line fuse. Direction doesnt matter. You still have to ground the device. Do not connect the grond and the hot together via the inline fuse. That will result in a blown fuse. I recomend this for you.
                        http://www.radioshack.com/product.as...ct%5Fid=28-288
                        or this one http://www.radioshack.com/product.as...ct%5Fid=28-280
                        I think we should try to get these available at the mp3car.com store. They are very useful training tools. They are made for kids but believe me, we could all learn something from them.

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                        • #13
                          You know whats sad, I went to school for all of this (graduate and certified PC tech, we took AC/DC, transistors, Analog, Digital, all that). I kinda skipped past all of that crap, since I was there just to get my certifications (Cisco, A+, etc)

                          I am a full time computer tech, I watch over 25 servers, but don't know about all of this...sad isnt it?
                          2000 Sunfire build 100%, or is it ever really 100%?

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                          • #14
                            Now all of that crap is coming back to haunt you. A friend of mine went to TESST Electronics school, made honor roll every quarter, aced all of his tests. But ask him about basic parallel resistor networks or the function of a capacitor and he has to go back to his notebooks to look it up. Funny, he too is a systems administrator monitoring a company's servers and WAN. I wonder if that's coincidence or a pattern?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Saab9-5
                              Good point. You don't want to run something like 24 gauge wire with a 30 amp fuse to your amp, only to have the wire overheat and ignite your carpeting!
                              I'd have mentioned that, but I thought it was obvious. Then again, the original poster was asking what a fuse was... Maybe not so obvious.

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