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  • Wire Size Dropping.

    Ok so im planning on running one large wire from the battery to the distro block like suggested by most.. Heres my issue..

    Ive never found a distro block with 16/18GA outputs. The opus wires are 18GA. So if i run 8GA out of the distro block (the smallest i can find) should i then fuse it when the wire size drops?

    Cheers guys

  • #2
    Originally posted by SKiTLz View Post
    Ok so im planning on running one large wire from the battery to the distro block like suggested by most.. Heres my issue..

    Ive never found a distro block with 16/18GA outputs. The opus wires are 18GA. So if i run 8GA out of the distro block (the smallest i can find) should i then fuse it when the wire size drops?

    Cheers guys
    Well you don't have to, but if you get a distro block with no individual fuses, then the guage change presents the perfect opportunity to individually fuse all your stuff. Of course a main fuse by the battery is still required too.
    Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
    1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
    30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
    15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
    Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

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    • #3
      Originally posted by 2k1Toaster View Post
      Well you don't have to, but if you get a distro block with no individual fuses, then the guage change presents the perfect opportunity to individually fuse all your stuff. Of course a main fuse by the battery is still required too.
      Ok.. The distro block is fused so that should be fine then.. Great. Thanks mate..

      I want a clean install so i've been reading like a mad man on electrical connections and doing things right.

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      • #4
        Technically a wire should be fused whenever there is a drop in size.

        I'm pretty sure you can still connect your 16/18 AWG wire to the disrto. The distro will hold a max of 4 AWG, but will work with smaller wires as well.
        Installed
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        • #5
          RE: Fuses keep your car from burning up!

          Everytime you change wire size, you change the maximum amount of current the circuit can carry. Too much current and you risk melting the insulator on the wire and starting a fire. Imagine if those wires under your seat and carpet shorted out and the fuse does not blow. You will have problems.

          The fuse at the battery is to protect all circuits from the fuse. The fuse when you change wire sizes protects the circuit where the wire size gets smaller and can carry less current

          The recommended maximum fuse for a 16-gauge wire is 7.5A. See this site:

          http://www.bcae1.com/wire.htm

          Good luck

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          • #6
            Yes my distro is 3 x 8g outputs but you could use some 14g out of it. Just might look small to the hole but splice back enough wire and shove it in and tighten it down. It will be fine.

            YES always use fuses when you can
            10 acura TL tech
            10 BMW S1000RR

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            • #7
              Great guys.. Appreciate all the input...

              Will post some pics of how it all goes..

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              • #8
                Blue Sea Systems makes some very nice distribution blocks with fuses. They have studs so you need crimp terminals. Makes for a neat installation if you have several circuits.

                Comment


                • #9
                  terminal strips are a good solution too:



                  http://www.mj-garage.com/cpg/display...lbum=68&pos=43
                  Jan Bennett
                  FS: VW MKIV Bezel for 8" Lilliput - 95% Finished

                  Please post on the forums! Chances are, someone else has or will have the same questions as you!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RedGTiVR6 View Post
                    terminal strips are a good solution too:



                    http://www.mj-garage.com/cpg/display...lbum=68&pos=43
                    I just went through your page. SUPER Clean install. Something id be proud to have in my car.

                    Unfortunately i dont think my skills are up there for something of that cailber. I still dont full understand the concept of a terminal block. And i think im going to wear google out with all my searching.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SKiTLz View Post
                      I just went through your page. SUPER Clean install. Something id be proud to have in my car.

                      Unfortunately i dont think my skills are up there for something of that cailber. I still dont full understand the concept of a terminal block. And i think im going to wear google out with all my searching.
                      Red's is one of the best.

                      Here is a pretty good description from wiki:

                      Originally posted by wiki
                      Terminal blocks (also called terminal boards or strips) provide a convenient means of connecting individual electrical wires. They are usually used to connect wiring among various items of equipment within an enclosure or to make connections among individually enclosed items. Since terminal blocks are readily available for a wide range of wire sizes and terminal quantity, they are one of the most flexible types of electrical connector available. Some disadvantages are that connecting wires is more difficult than simply plugging in a cable and the terminals are generally not very well protected from contact with persons or foreign conducting materials.

                      One type of terminal block accepts wires that are prepared only by removing (stripping) a short length of insulation from the end. Another type accepts wires that have ring or spade terminal lugs crimped onto the wires. Printed circuit board (PCB) mounted terminal blocks allow individual wires to be connected to the circuit board. PCB mounted terminal blocks are soldered to the board, but they are available in a pull-apart version that allows the wire-connecting half of the block to be unplugged from the part that is soldered to the PCB.


                      Basically to sum up, it is just a hunk of conductive material (metal) with some connectors (usually screws). That way you can screw wires to the metal and easily connect and disconnect them. Now some fancy ones like in Red's setup, have fuses built in.
                      Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
                      1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
                      30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
                      15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
                      Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 2k1Toaster View Post
                        Red's is one of the best.

                        Here is a pretty good description from wiki:
                        description from wiki:


                        Basically to sum up, it is just a hunk of conductive material (metal) with some connectors (usually screws). That way you can screw wires to the metal and easily connect and disconnect them. Now some fancy ones like in Red's setup, have fuses built in.
                        Im an I.T guy. Not so much electrical. Would a good comparisson of a terminal block be a patch panel? Thats my understanding.

                        If its say a 4 position terminal block. Can i feed 4 different signals? 12V through one. 5V though one. etc etc. Or does it not work like that?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SKiTLz View Post
                          Im an I.T guy. Not so much electrical. Would a good comparisson of a terminal block be a patch panel? Thats my understanding.

                          If its say a 4 position terminal block. Can i feed 4 different signals? 12V through one. 5V though one. etc etc. Or does it not work like that?



                          Im an I.T guy. Not so much electrical. Would a good comparisson of a terminal block be a patch panel? Thats my understanding.

                          If its say a 4 position terminal block. Can i feed 4 different signals? 12V through one. 5V though one. etc etc. Or does it not work like that?
                          Yes. Terminal blocks are independant.

                          Distribution blocks are dependant.

                          Distribution blocks are like routers. They shell out 1 piece of data to many many different locations.

                          Terminal blocks are like patch panels, yes.
                          Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
                          1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
                          30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
                          15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
                          Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 2k1Toaster View Post
                            Yes. Terminal blocks are independant.

                            Distribution blocks are dependant.

                            Distribution blocks are like routers. They shell out 1 piece of data to many many different locations.

                            Terminal blocks are like patch panels, yes.
                            Thats a language i speak. Makes perfect sense. I like how where hopping back and forth between two threads on pretty much the same topic. haha

                            Cheers mate.

                            One more thing i just thought of..

                            Are all terminal blocks 1:1. Meaning 1 in 1 out.. Or is it possible to have multiple independant loads that are output multiple ways.. If that made any sense.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SKiTLz View Post
                              Are all terminal blocks 1:1. Meaning 1 in 1 out.. Or is it possible to have multiple independant loads that are output multiple ways.. If that made any sense.
                              That is done all of the time with jumpers. so in that bottom terminal block in the above picture (black/labeled;14,P3,16): you could jumper the terminal with the yellow wire(14) to the terminal with the white wire (P3), and they both would get the same signal (or voltage, if you will) and the black wired terminal (16) would still be independant.
                              Some terminal block manufacturers make fancy jumpers that are made of sheet metal and don't require short peices of wire, stripped and lugged, between the terminals.
                              I'm not at a computer I could upload from at the moment, so I cant help visually, sorry.
                              So ... Yes.
                              It's been a while...

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